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Forgemind ArchiMedia via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

This Japanese Kindergarten Was Constructed Around a Revered Tree

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Forgemind ArchiMedia via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Since it was first planted over 50 years ago, a Zelkova tree outside Tokyo has provided the local children with a safe space to climb and play. At one point the community risked losing the tree for good after it was struck by a typhoon and nearly uprooted—the tree became dry and lifeless, but it eventually regained its former vibrancy much to everyone’s surprise. As a way of honoring the legendary tree, a nearby kindergarten decided to build an extension spiraling around it.

Fuji Kindergarten’s “Ring Around a Tree” was created in 2011 by the award-winning Tezuka Architects as an innovative platform for learning and play. The wood and glass structure wraps around the tree’s trunk, creating six child-sized “floors” with some reaching only 3 feet high. In addition to making an epic playground, the area is also used for foreign language instruction and as a place where kids can wait for the bus after school. After holding class in a tree, you’d think it'd be hard to drag students inside—but luckily the other parts of the Kindergarten are just as extraordinary.

Images courtesy of Forgemind ArchiMedia via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

[h/t My Modern Net]

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Emmanuel Dunand/Getty Images
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entertainment
Grand Central Terminal is Hosting a Film Festival of its Own Cameos
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Emmanuel Dunand/Getty Images

Even if you’ve never set foot in New York City, chances are you’re intimately familiar with Grand Central Terminal. A sprawling, architecturally awesome railway station located on East 42nd Street in Manhattan, it’s been a favorite of Hollywood location scouts since its first onscreen appearance in the 1930 musical Puttin’ on the Ritz.

According to Times Square Chronicles, the terminal is now set to host an event worthy of its rich cinematic history: a film festival. On Thursday, October 19, screenings in the terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall will include clips from some of its most notable movie appearances. The show will culminate in a feature-length presentation of Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 classic North by Northwest, notable for a scene in which star Cary Grant eludes his pursuers by making his way through Grand Central.

The Museum of the Moving Image and Rooftop Films are collaborating on the special event, titled Grand Central Cinema. North by Northwest begins at 7:30 p.m., but that ticketed admission is already sold out and the waiting list is at capacity. Fortunately, the montage of clips will play all day from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Historians will also be giving presentations of the site's history on screen throughout the program. Admission is free.

[h/t Times Square Chronicles]

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MODS International, Amazon
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architecture
You Can Now Shop for Tiny Houses on Amazon
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MODS International, Amazon

Whether you’re in the market for board games, boxed wine, or pickup trucks, you can likely find what you’re looking for on Amazon. Now, the web retailer’s catalogue of 400,000,000 items includes actual homes. As Curbed reports, Amazon will deliver a tiny house made from a shipping container to your current place of residence.

The pint-sized dwelling is made by the modular home builder MODS International, and is selling for $36,000 (plus $3754 for shipping, even for Prime members). The container is prefabricated and move-in ready, with a bedroom, shower, toilet, sink, kitchenette, and living area built into the 320-square-foot space. The tiny house also includes heating and air conditioning, making it a good fit for any climate. And though the abode does have places to hook up sewage, water, and electrical work, you'll have to do a little work before switching on a light or flushing the toilet.

Becoming a homeowner without the six-digit price tag may sound like a deal, but the MODS International home costs slightly more than the average tiny house. It’s not hard for minimalists to find a place for about $25,000, and people willing to build a home themselves can do so without spending more than $10,000. But it's hard to put a price on the convenience of browsing and buying homes online in your pajamas.

[h/t Curbed]

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