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Frank Miller/DC Comics
Frank Miller/DC Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Frank Miller/DC Comics
Frank Miller/DC Comics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

Dark Knight III: The Master Race

By Frank Miller, Brian Azzarello, Andy Kubert and Klaus Janson
DC Comics

Thirty years ago, Frank Miller changed comics forever with The Dark Knight Returns, maybe the most famous Batman comic of all time. It helped usher in a grim and violent era for superhero comics that still hasn’t left us. Fifteen years later, Miller dumbfounded many of his own fans with the deeply weird sequel, The Dark Knight Strikes Again, which was a garish, lowbrow satire of the superhero genre and the original DKR itself. It seemed to kickstart a disconcerting second phase to Miller’s career that alienated many of his original fans with off-putting books like the raunchy All-Star Batman & Robin and the anti-Islamic rant that is Holy Terror.

Now, another fifteen years later, comes the third installment with a name that makes Miller critics cringe: Dark Knight III: The Master Race. This time out, DC may be hedging their bets a little by pairing Miller with known quantities like co-writer Brian Azzarello (100 Bullets) and veteran artists Andy Kubert and Klaus Janson (Miller’s original inker on DKR).

It’s a little unclear how much involvement Miller has in this book beyond providing the basic plot, but each issue of this series will be packaged with a mini-comic, and the first one is written and drawn by Miller himself and features The Atom. Both the mini comic and the main comic are set three years after DKSA. The main story, drawn by Kubert with heavy Miller influences on the layout, focuses primarily on the women on the Dark Knight universe: Carrie Kelley, Commissioner Ellen Yindel, and Lara, the daughter of Superman and Wonder Woman.

DK III is being billed as the “epic ending” of the Dark Knight series, but Miller has already announced that he plans to write a DKIV.

The Eternaut

by Héctor Germán Oesterheld and Francisco Solano Lopez
Fantagraphics

The Eternaut is a revered science fiction classic in Argentina, though it is mostly unknown in the States, having never been translated to English until now. Serialized weekly in the Buenos Aires newspaper Hora Cero from 1957 to 1959, it was written by Héctor Germán Oesterheld, a staunch leftist who structured the story with political allegories about collective strength triumphing over military might. Along with his biography of Argentinian revolutionary Che Guevara, The Eternaut made Oesterheld and artist Francisco Solano Lopez enemies of the state. In 1977, Oesterheld and his family went into hiding and were never seen again, believed to have been disappeared by the Argentinian government. In order to avoid such a fate, Lopez fled Argentina for Spain.

The comic begins with a mysterious, phosphorescent snowfall that immediately kills anyone who comes in contact with it. A group of friends playing a card game notice what is happening outside and manage to seal themselves off from the danger and rig protection suits out of SCUBA gear. What appears to be a nuclear winter soon reveals itself to be an alien invasion, and one dangerous situation leads to another.

Mixing post-apocalyptic drama, aliens, and even time travel with political subtext and a literary sophistication that American science fiction comics of the era couldn't match, this is an absolutely gripping page-turner that holds up all these years later, thanks in large part to the care Fantagraphics has taken in translating and repackaging the material.

Here is some more information about the Fantagraphics edition, including an excerpt.

Apartment 3G

By Margaret Shulock and Frank Bolle
King Features Syndicate

For 54 years, Apartment 3G has appeared in newspapers and on the web via the King Features Syndicate, but on November 22 it ran its final strip. It was an anti-climactic, bordering-on-incoherent finale that, if you had been following this comic recently, you would've known to expect. As this AV Club article notes, a small collection of blogs sprouted up over the years dedicated to following this strip and cataloging just how odd it was becoming.

In 1952, psychiatrist Dr. Nicholas P. Dallis and artist Alex Kotzky created this soap opera strip about three unmarried working women sharing an apartment in New York (a novel subject at the time). Kotzky was an exquisite illustrator who gave Apartment 3G a fashionable look equal to any of the great "realistic” strips of that era. Dallis and Kotzky kept working on it up until their deaths (Dallis in 1991 and Kotzky in 1996). Kotzky’s family handed the strip over to writer Margaret Shulock and artist Frank Bolle who continued it until the very end. At some point, however, Shulock and Bolle brought the strip (unintentionally, but who knows?) to a level of absurdism that no one would expect.

Dialogue became incoherent, and the now 90-year-old Bolle's artwork seemed to only show talking heads and the barest indication of backgrounds.The increasingly bizarre plot lines introduced over the years seemed to never amount to anything and, in the final stretch, Shulock and Bolle jumped the story ahead four weeks in order to avoid tying up any of the loose threads. The very last strip combined disparate scenes from the previous week (as many of the Sunday strips tended to do). The addition of a never-before-seen dog peering over Margo’s shoulder perplexed anyone who had been following this strip.

Comics journalist Tom Spurgeon has a puzzled yet positive write-up that describes the path the strip ended up taking as containing a "what-we-call-Lynchian quality.” You can go back and read the final strips here, but I’d recommended reading them through one of the hilarious commentary blogs like The Lovely Ladies of Apartment 3G. A comic strip wandering off to a shaky end like this after half a century of daily output is sad and, perhaps, is a symptom of a greater extinction threat to daily comics. If you're looking for a silver lining, at least it seemed to entertain the few people that were still paying attention.

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DC Comics, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
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The Dark Knight Is Returning to Theaters, Just Ahead of 10th Anniversary
DC Comics, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
DC Comics, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Believe it or not, July 18 will mark the 10th anniversary of the release of The Dark Knight, the second entry in Christopher Nolan’s game-changing superhero movie trilogy. To mark the occasion, Showcase Cinemas—the movie theater chain behind the Cinema de Lux experience—is bringing the movie back to select theaters on the east coast for limited screenings on February 8 and February 11, /Film reports.

Many people consider The Dark Knight the best film in the Batman franchise (Tim Burton and LEGO-fied movies included). The film currently holds a 94 percent “fresh” rating with both critics and audiences on Rotten Tomatoes, making it the highest-rated movie in the Batman universe.

Much of the film’s acclaim came from Heath Ledger’s brilliant turn as The Joker—a role that won him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar (making him the only actor to win that award posthumously). Even Michael Caine, who plays Bruce Wayne’s ever-dutiful butler and BFF Alfred, admitted that he wasn’t sold on the idea of bringing The Joker back into Batman’s cinematic universe, after the character was so ably played by Jack Nicholson in Burton’s 1989 film, until he found out Ledger would be taking the role.

“You don’t try and top Jack,” was Caine’s original thought. But when Nolan informed the actor that he was casting Ledger, that changed things. “I thought: ‘Now that’s the one guy that could do it!’ My confidence came back,” Caine told Empire Magazine.

To find out if The Dark Knight is playing at a theater near you, visit Showcase Cinemas’s website. If it’s not, don’t despair: With the official anniversary still six months away, other theaters are bound to have the same idea.

[h/t: /Film]

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BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
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10 Amazing Facts About Stan Lee
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Comic book legend Stan Lee’s life has always been an open book. The co-creator of some of the greatest superheroes and most beloved stories of all time has become just as mythical and larger-than-life as the characters in the panels. In 2015, around the time of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, Lee had the idea to reflect on his own life, as he said, “in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comic book … or if you prefer, a graphic memoir.”

The result, published by the Touchstone imprint of Simon & Schuster in 2015, was Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir—which was written by Lee with Peter David and features artwork by cartoonist and illustrator Colleen Doran. Here are 10 things we learned about Lee, on his 95th birthday.

1. HIS WIFE IS ALSO HIS BARBER.

As a bit of a throwaway fact, Stanley Martin Lieber (Stan Lee) reveals the secret of his slicked back mane on the second page of his memoir. “My whole adult life, I’ve never been to a barber,” he writes. “Joanie always cuts my hair.”

2. HIS CONFIDENCE COMES FROM HIS MOTHER.

Amazing Fantastic IncredibleCourtesy POW! Entertainment[2].jpg

Stan Lee writes that as a child he loved to read books by Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and others, and his mother often watched him read. “I probably got my self-confidence from the fact that my mother thought everything I did was brilliant.”

3. YOUNG STAN LEE WROTE OBITUARIES.

Before writing about the fantastic lives of fictional characters, Stan Lee wrote antemortem obituaries for celebrities at an undisclosed news office in New York. He says that he eventually quit that job because it was too “depressing.”

4. CAPTAIN AMERICA WAS HIS FIRST BIG BREAK.

A week into his job at Timely Comics, Lee got the opportunity to write a two-page Captain America comic. He wrote it under the pen name Stan Lee (now his legal name) and titled it "Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge." His first full comic script would come in Captain America Issue 5, published August 1, 1941.

5. HE WROTE TRAINING FILMS FOR THE ARMY WITH DR. SEUSS.

After being transferred from the army’s Signal Corps in New Jersey, Lee worked as a playwright in the Training Film Division in Queens with eight other men, including a few who went on to be very famous: Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Saroyan, cartoonist Charles Addams (creator of The Addams Family), director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington [1939] and It’s a Wonderful Life [1946]) and Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

6. HE DEFIED THE COMICS CODE AUTHORITY WITH AN ANTI-DRUG COMIC.

In 1971, Lee received a letter from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare asking him to put an anti-drug message in one of his books. He came up with a Spider-Man story that involved his best friend Harry abusing pills because of a break-up. The CCA would not approve the story with their seal because of the mention of drugs, but Lee convinced his publisher, Martin Goodman, to run the comic anyway.

7. AN ISSUE AT THE PRINTERS TURNED THE HULK GREEN.

The character was supposed to be gray, but Lee writes that the printer had a hard time keeping the color consistent. “So as of issue #2,” Lee writes, “with no explanation, he turned green.”

8. HIS WIFE DESTROYED HIS PRIZED TYPEWRITER.


Rich Polk/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly

According to Lee, during an argument, Joanie destroyed the typewriter he used to write the first issues for characters including Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four. “This happened before eBay," he writes. "Too bad. I could’ve auctioned the parts and made a mint.”

9. A FIRE DESTROYED HIS INTERVIEWS AND LECTURES.

When Lee moved his family to Los Angeles, he set up a studio in Van Nuys where he stored videotapes of his talks and interviews, along with a commissioned bust of his wife. The building was lost to a blaze that the fire department believed was arson, but no one was ever charged with the crime.

10. HIS FAVORITE MARVEL FILM CAMEO WAS BASED ON ONE FROM THE COMICS.

Beginning with the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Stan Lee has made quick cameos in Marvel films as a service to the fans. He says that his appearance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) was inspired by the story of Reed and Sue Richards’ wedding in Fantastic Four Annual Volume 1 #3, in which he and artist/writer Jack Kirby attempt to crash the ceremony but are thwarted.

All images courtesy of Touchstone unless otherwise noted.

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