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Frank Miller/DC Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

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Frank Miller/DC Comics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

Dark Knight III: The Master Race

By Frank Miller, Brian Azzarello, Andy Kubert and Klaus Janson
DC Comics

Thirty years ago, Frank Miller changed comics forever with The Dark Knight Returns, maybe the most famous Batman comic of all time. It helped usher in a grim and violent era for superhero comics that still hasn’t left us. Fifteen years later, Miller dumbfounded many of his own fans with the deeply weird sequel, The Dark Knight Strikes Again, which was a garish, lowbrow satire of the superhero genre and the original DKR itself. It seemed to kickstart a disconcerting second phase to Miller’s career that alienated many of his original fans with off-putting books like the raunchy All-Star Batman & Robin and the anti-Islamic rant that is Holy Terror.

Now, another fifteen years later, comes the third installment with a name that makes Miller critics cringe: Dark Knight III: The Master Race. This time out, DC may be hedging their bets a little by pairing Miller with known quantities like co-writer Brian Azzarello (100 Bullets) and veteran artists Andy Kubert and Klaus Janson (Miller’s original inker on DKR).

It’s a little unclear how much involvement Miller has in this book beyond providing the basic plot, but each issue of this series will be packaged with a mini-comic, and the first one is written and drawn by Miller himself and features The Atom. Both the mini comic and the main comic are set three years after DKSA. The main story, drawn by Kubert with heavy Miller influences on the layout, focuses primarily on the women on the Dark Knight universe: Carrie Kelley, Commissioner Ellen Yindel, and Lara, the daughter of Superman and Wonder Woman.

DK III is being billed as the “epic ending” of the Dark Knight series, but Miller has already announced that he plans to write a DKIV.

The Eternaut

by Héctor Germán Oesterheld and Francisco Solano Lopez
Fantagraphics

The Eternaut is a revered science fiction classic in Argentina, though it is mostly unknown in the States, having never been translated to English until now. Serialized weekly in the Buenos Aires newspaper Hora Cero from 1957 to 1959, it was written by Héctor Germán Oesterheld, a staunch leftist who structured the story with political allegories about collective strength triumphing over military might. Along with his biography of Argentinian revolutionary Che Guevara, The Eternaut made Oesterheld and artist Francisco Solano Lopez enemies of the state. In 1977, Oesterheld and his family went into hiding and were never seen again, believed to have been disappeared by the Argentinian government. In order to avoid such a fate, Lopez fled Argentina for Spain.

The comic begins with a mysterious, phosphorescent snowfall that immediately kills anyone who comes in contact with it. A group of friends playing a card game notice what is happening outside and manage to seal themselves off from the danger and rig protection suits out of SCUBA gear. What appears to be a nuclear winter soon reveals itself to be an alien invasion, and one dangerous situation leads to another.

Mixing post-apocalyptic drama, aliens, and even time travel with political subtext and a literary sophistication that American science fiction comics of the era couldn't match, this is an absolutely gripping page-turner that holds up all these years later, thanks in large part to the care Fantagraphics has taken in translating and repackaging the material.

Here is some more information about the Fantagraphics edition, including an excerpt.

Apartment 3G

By Margaret Shulock and Frank Bolle
King Features Syndicate

For 54 years, Apartment 3G has appeared in newspapers and on the web via the King Features Syndicate, but on November 22 it ran its final strip. It was an anti-climactic, bordering-on-incoherent finale that, if you had been following this comic recently, you would've known to expect. As this AV Club article notes, a small collection of blogs sprouted up over the years dedicated to following this strip and cataloging just how odd it was becoming.

In 1952, psychiatrist Dr. Nicholas P. Dallis and artist Alex Kotzky created this soap opera strip about three unmarried working women sharing an apartment in New York (a novel subject at the time). Kotzky was an exquisite illustrator who gave Apartment 3G a fashionable look equal to any of the great "realistic” strips of that era. Dallis and Kotzky kept working on it up until their deaths (Dallis in 1991 and Kotzky in 1996). Kotzky’s family handed the strip over to writer Margaret Shulock and artist Frank Bolle who continued it until the very end. At some point, however, Shulock and Bolle brought the strip (unintentionally, but who knows?) to a level of absurdism that no one would expect.

Dialogue became incoherent, and the now 90-year-old Bolle's artwork seemed to only show talking heads and the barest indication of backgrounds.The increasingly bizarre plot lines introduced over the years seemed to never amount to anything and, in the final stretch, Shulock and Bolle jumped the story ahead four weeks in order to avoid tying up any of the loose threads. The very last strip combined disparate scenes from the previous week (as many of the Sunday strips tended to do). The addition of a never-before-seen dog peering over Margo’s shoulder perplexed anyone who had been following this strip.

Comics journalist Tom Spurgeon has a puzzled yet positive write-up that describes the path the strip ended up taking as containing a "what-we-call-Lynchian quality.” You can go back and read the final strips here, but I’d recommended reading them through one of the hilarious commentary blogs like The Lovely Ladies of Apartment 3G. A comic strip wandering off to a shaky end like this after half a century of daily output is sad and, perhaps, is a symptom of a greater extinction threat to daily comics. If you're looking for a silver lining, at least it seemed to entertain the few people that were still paying attention.

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Courtesy eBay
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entertainment
Rare Wonder Woman Comics Up for Auction on eBay
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Courtesy eBay

Three super-rare Wonder Woman comic books—including issue No. 1—are about to be auctioned off on eBay.

The comics being auctioned (separately) are Wonder Woman No. 1, Sensational Comics No. 1, and All Star Comics No. 8, all featuring some of the earliest representations of DC Comics’s timeless superhero. The rare finds are the highest quality ever found for these items, and their existence wasn't public before the auction launched.

All the comics illuminate Wonder Woman's origins within the comic book world. Published in December 1941, All Star Comics No. 8 marked the first appearance of Wonder Woman. Her first cover image was on Sensation Comics No. 1, originally released in January 1942. Her first full-length comic book, Wonder Woman No. 1, came out in July 1942.

In terms of condition, all of the copies featured in this sale are the highest-rated editions ever found according to CGC, a vintage comic assessment organization. (They got ratings of 9.0 or higher out of 10, meaning very fine or near-mint condition.)

The comics are on sale from comics shop owner Darren Adams, who sold a copy of the first Superman comic in 2014 for a historic $3.2 million. The copy of the first issue of Wonder Woman was originally sent to Harper’s Magazine, only to be put in a cabinet and forgotten. The other two comics were bought from a collector.

The auction starts on August 17 at 5 p.m. Pacific time / 8 p.m. Eastern time. A portion of the proceeds will go to the non-profit Trafficking Hope. Watch Adams discuss the comics up for sale in the video below:

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Pop Culture
A Sequel to The Nightmare Before Christmas is Coming—to a Bookstore Near You
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Joel Fletcher/Online USA

Jack Skellington may have found his happily ever after in Halloween Town, but Christmas Town still has some misadventures in store for his faithful ghost dog, Zero. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas will receive a comic book sequel, starring Zero, nearly 25 years after the movie’s original release.

Manga publisher TOKYOPOP has secured a license for the project, which will be titled Nightmare Before Christmas: Zero's Journey. The tale—which follows a lost Zero through Christmas Town—will initially be serialized as full-color single issues, and will later be published as full-color paperbacks and tiny, black-and-white manga volumes.

Zero's Journey is slated for launch in spring 2018. Until then, you can check out the cover art below, or get psyched for the comic's release by brushing up on your The Nightmare Before Christmas trivia.

Tim Burton's 1993 film 'The Nightmare Before Christmas' will receive a comic book sequel courtesy of Japanese manga publisher Tokyopop.
Courtesy of Tokyopop

[h/t The Hollywood Reporter]

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