Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7:00 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5:00 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant. 

Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas. 

And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work. 

You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

[h/t: Vox]

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

How Much Money You Need to Earn in Each State to Rent a House, Mapped

iStock
iStock

In many places across the U.S., the rent is simply too damn high. Average housing prices are rising twice as fast as wages are, and as a result, more and more people are renting. And that's not cheap either—as of 2015, 38 percent of American households were "rent-burdened," meaning spending more than 30 percent of their income on housing.

What does this mean for you? This map from the cost information site How Much, spotted by Thrillist, can tell you. It details what kind of monthly income you need to make in order to rent the average home in each state without spending more than 30 percent of your salary.

The map may confirm what you already suspected: Places like California, New York, Massachusetts, D.C., and Hawaii are very expensive to live in. You might be surprised to learn just how expensive, though. While a renter in Iowa only needs to earn $3500 or so a month to comfortably pay for housing, someone living in Washington, D.C. needs to make almost $8500 a month, or almost $102,000 a year.

A pink and red map of monthly wages needed to afford housing in each state
How Much

Here's what you need to make each month to live in the top 10 most expensive states in the U.S.:

1. Washington D.C.: $8487
2. California: $8313
3. Hawaii: $7806
4. New York: $7223
5. Massachusetts: $7193
6. New Jersey: $6717
7. Colorado: $6197
8. Washington: $5993
9. Maryland: $5863
10. Connecticut: $5590

And here are the 10 cheapest:

1. West Virginia: $2960
2. Oklahoma: $3117
3. Arkansas: $3157
4. Alabama: $3313
5. Missouri: $3367
6 Kansas: $3437
7. Iowa: $3473
8. Mississippi: $3493
9. Kentucky: $3570
10. Ohio: $3613

But before you pack up and move to West Virginia or Mississippi, be aware that those states also have some of the lowest median wages in the U.S., meaning that in reality, housing isn't all that affordable there, either.

There are, to be sure, some weaknesses with this particular data. The map doesn't take into account what kind of home you'd be renting—it just looks at the median price for a rental in each state—nor does it distinguish between locations within states. (The rent in Syracuse, New York is a lot different than the rent in Manhattan, just like the rent in San Francisco is a lot different than the rent in Fresno, California.) But it's still a useful snapshot of our current housing situation.

Take a look at the rest of the data over on HowMuch.net.

[h/t Thrillist]

The Top-Rated Movie in Every Country

Vouchercloud
Vouchercloud

Want to impress your friends with your knowledge of foreign films but don’t know where to start? This map from Vouchercloud provides a good starting point. The UK-based voucher site used public reviews from IMDB to create a map showing the best-rated movie produced in nearly every country. (As it turns out, some nations, like North Korea, don’t have much of a film industry.)

A movie map of the world
Click here to enlarge
Vouchercloud

Films featured on the map were either produced, filmed, or linked in some way to the country in which they are listed. Judging by the map, drama appears to be the most popular genre worldwide, with the top movies from 39 countries being classified as such. Comedy is the second most popular genre, followed by adventure, crime, biography, action, and animation.

The newest releases from 2018 to appear on the map include The Wild Pear Tree (from Bosnia and Herzegovina), Dying to Survive (China), Ekvtime: Man of God (Georgia), Goodachari (India), Yowis Ben (Indonesia), Deception: Oo Pel Dan Myin (Myanmar), Dilan 1990 (Singapore), and Ahlat Agaci (Sweden).

Of course, a few familiar titles also make an appearance: The top movie in the U.S.—as well as the top-rated movie on IMDB’s site in general—is writer-director Frank Darabont’s 1994 drama The Shawshank Redemption. Other big box office hits include Casino Royale (claimed by the Bahamas) and The Dark Knight (UK). Many of the films on the map have ties to more than one country, such as Fight Club (1999), which is set in the U.S. but is listed as Germany’s top-rated film. Similarly, First They Killed My Father (the 2017 film directed by Angelina Jolie) was primarily shot in Cambodia.

If you want to get a jump start on your viewing party, Jolie's movie about the Khmer Rouge is available on Netflix streaming (at least for American viewers), as are Punjab 1984 (Canada’s top film) and Room (Ireland’s top film).

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