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Literary Magazine Publishes a Forgotten Faulkner Play

Thanks to novels like The Sound and the Fury and As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner isn’t exactly remembered as a lighthearted author. However, a rediscovered play written by the famous scribe shows that Faulkner didn’t just have a talent for dense, postmodernist prose—he also had comedy chops.

Faulkner wrote the one-act work in his early 20s, likely for a college theater group he belonged to at the University of Mississippi. It was found in the University of Virginia's archives by Andrew Gulli, managing editor of a quarterly fiction publication called The Strand Magazine. Called "Twixt Cup and Lip,” the play was recently published in The Strand’s holiday issue. It tells the tale of a Jazz Age woman who’s pursued by two suitors. Typical of the time period, it’s filled with innuendo, cigarettes, and cocktails. It’s also far different from Faulkner’s future writing.

"He's showing a knack for comedy and a knack for dialogue, too," Christopher Rieger, director of the Center for Faulkner Studies at Southeast Missouri State University, told the Associated Press. "You're not seeing the trademarks from his more famous works, although the techniques he's perfecting here would serve him well."

Proving that his early theatrical endeavors weren’t in vain, Faulkner later wrote Hollywood screenplays. However, this particular play is also interesting because Rieger believes it might have been inspired by Faulkner's relationship with his high school girlfriend—and future wife—Estelle Oldham. Pressured by her family to marry another man, Oldham initially devastated Faulkner. In “Twixt Cup and Lip,” he might have wistfully re-imagined her as the lead: a feisty female who knew her own mind—and heart.

[h/t Associated Press]

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Hamilton Broadway
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A Hamilton-Themed Cookbook is Coming
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Hamilton Broadway

Fans of Broadway hit Hamilton will soon be able to dine like the Founding Fathers: As Eater reports, a new Alexander Hamilton-inspired cookbook is slated for release in fall 2017.

Cover art for Laura Kumin's forthcoming cookbook
Amazon

Called The Hamilton Cookbook: Cooking, Eating, and Entertaining in Hamilton’s World, the recipe collection by author Laura Kumin “takes you into Hamilton’s home and to his table, with historical information, recipes, and tips on how you can prepare food and serve the food that our founding fathers enjoyed in their day,” according to the Amazon description. It also recounts Hamilton’s favorite dishes, how he enjoyed them, and which ingredients were used.

Recipes included are cauliflower florets two ways, fried sausages and apples, gingerbread cake, and apple pie. (Cue the "young, scrappy, and hungry" references.) The cookbook’s official release is on November 21—but until then, you can stave off your appetite for all things Hamilton-related by downloading the musical’s new app.

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New Tolkien-Themed Botany Book Describes the Plants of Middle-Earth
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While reading The Lord of the Rings saga, it's hard not to notice J.R.R. Tolkien’s clear love of nature. The books are replete with descriptions of lush foliage, rolling prairies, and coniferous forests. A new botany book builds on that knowledge: Entertainment Weekly reports that Flora of Middle-Earth: Plants of J.R.R. Tolkien's Legendarium provides fantasy-loving naturalists with a round-up of plants that grow in Middle-earth.

Cover art for botanist Walter Judd's book
Oxford University Press

Written by University of Florida botanist Walter Judd, the book explores the ecology, etymology, and importance of over 160 plants. Many are either real—coffee, barley, wheat, etc.—or based on real-life species. (For example, pipe-weed may be tobacco, and mallorns are large trees similar to beech trees.)

Using his botany background, Judd explores why Tolkien may have felt compelled to include each in his fantasy world. His analyses are paired with woodcut-style drawings by artist Graham Judd, which depict Middle-earth's flowers, vegetables, fruits, herbs, and shrubs in their "natural" environments.

[h/t Entertainment Weekly]

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