The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

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Shigeru Mizuki/Drawn & Quarterly
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Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

Shigeru Mizuki’s Hitler

By Shigeru Mizuki
Drawn & Quarterly

Shigeru Mizuki’s manga biography of Hitler, translated to English for the first time and released this week by Drawn & Quarterly, is a rare, non-Western view of the Nazi leader written by a Japanese man who technically fought on the same side during the War.

Mizuki lost his drawing arm in World War II and still went on to become one of Japan’s greatest manga artists, creating the extremely popular series GeGeGe no Kitarō as well as historical manga like the multi-volume history of Japan, Showa. As in Showa, Mizuki mixes photo-realistic backgrounds with cartoony characters. At first it may seem too comedic for subject matter like this, but his exaggerated rendition of Hitler not only provides a safe distance from his evil, but also accentuates every aspect of him—from his unpredictable, irrational anger to his bufoonish demeanor as a young vagrant.

The Japanese have a complicated view of WWII, but Hitler, to them, was a figure far removed from their war in the Pacific. At the time this book was first released in 1971, his crimes and motivations were relatively unknown to the younger Japanese generation. Yet, if not for their alliance with Germany, Japan’s military involvement would not have escalated to the point of national and, for Mizuki, personal catastrophe. Mizuki says in the book's intro, “My destiny would have been different…So how could I not be interested in Hitler, and in knowing what sort of man he really was?" 

Our Expanding Universe

By Alex Robinson
Top Shelf

Back in the ’90’s, Alex Robinson self-published a black-and-white mini-comic called Box Office Poison that did for indie comics what the work of Kevin Smith and Ed Burns did for indie film at the time. Along with people like Bob Fingerman and Terry Moore, Robinson was at the forefront of a new wave of comics that told character-driven, slice-of-life stories that would soon appeal to an audience outside of the typical comic-buying crowd of that era. In its 600+ page graphic novel incarnation, Box Office Poison was a bookstore hit and is one of the most revered graphic novels of all time.

Where Box Office Poison was a funny, heartfelt look at 20-somethings discovering adulthood in Brooklyn in the 1990s, Robinson’s newest book, Our Expanding Universe, is a funny, heartfelt look at 40-somethings discovering parenthood in Brooklyn in 2015. Framed by narration that explains the birth of the universe, we get to know three longtime friends who find their personal universes forever altered by the impending arrival of two babies. The readers who found that Box Office Poison spoke to them at the perfect moment in their lives will likely feel the same about this story of nannies and ovulation cycles, even if they aren’t parents themselves. In fact, Robinson has the non-breeders well represented with Brownie, the wise-cracking single friend who is defiantly against having children. All of Robinson’s characters are believable and sympathetic despite their flaws, and he excels at showing them in conversation—something that is hard to do in a comic book. Not only does he pull it off, but this is one of the best books of the year.

Platinum End: Chapter One

By Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata
Viz

The creators behind two best selling manga—Death Note and Bakumanare back with a new book that is serialized in Japan’s Jump SQ magazine and simultaneously made available digitally through sellers like Comixology. 

Platinum End begins with a young student named Mirai attempting suicide by jumping off a building, only to be caught by an angel. The angel offers him two gifts: the power of flight to escape his troubles and the power to make anyone fall in love with him. Mirai notes that these are potentially demonic gifts for an angel to bestow, but he accepts them anyway.

This first issue is 70 pages long and does a great job setting up its premise. Takeshi Obata’s detailed artwork is stunning, and fans of Death Note will want to get on board for this one. 

101 Artists To Listen To Before You Die

By Ricardo Cavolo
Nobrow 

Choosing 101 musicians that have influenced his life in some way, Ricardo Cavolo created two-page spreads for each performer. These consist of colorful portraits and handwritten anecdotes about his personal relationship to their music (Cavolo had his own Spanish translated to English and then rewrote the text for this edition). The range of artists includes Bach, Muddy Waters, Dolly Parton, Iggy Pop, Wu-Tang Clan, and Skrillex. 

It’s a unique combination of words and pictures that will make you consider all the important musicians in your own life—and maybe introduce some new ones to you.

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November 18, 2015 - 10:30pm
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