In this video from the Computer History Museum, Steve Jobs gives an early presentation about Apple. If you're a computer aficionado—regardless of whether you're an Apple fan—this is fascinating.

In the presentation, Jobs points out what a big deal it is that Apple's secretaries have computers with spreadsheet apps installed on them. He talks about how kids are better at using computers than he is. He talks about ease of use being the biggest barrier for new users of computers (four years later, Apple would introduce the Mac). He talks about the value of a personal computer (one per person) rather than sharing massive computers, even if they're more powerful. He explores what increasing computing power should be used for—he suggests spending it on making computers easier to use. He even refuses to comment on future products! With 35 years of perspective, this is both extremely retro and surprisingly prescient.

Note that there are lots of glitches in the video, but you can mostly figure out what's going on. Have a look:

My favorite bit from the Q&A: "I don't think the Apple II is ever going to be obsolete." The last Apple II series computer was made 13 years later (!), long after the Mac was Apple's main product, making the Apple II one of the longest-lived computer systems in history.

Related: Watch Steve Jobs Present the First-Ever 'Stevenote' in 1984; Steve Jobs' Stanford Commencement Address; How Apple's '1984' Ad Was Almost Canceled; and Here's to the Crazy Ones.