The American Dentist Who Drilled a Secret Message on Tojo's Dentures

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Getty Images

After his country surrendered to the United States in 1945, former Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo had a pretty rough go of things. A failed suicide attempt left his stomach mangled (he tried to shoot himself in the heart but missed), and he had to recover in a Tokyo jail while he awaited trial for war crimes. While imprisoned, he became the butt of a prank that left a secret message drilled into his top set of false teeth, right at the tip of his tongue: "Remember Pearl Harbor."

The message was put there by a 22-year-old dental prosthetics officer with the U.S. Navy named Jack Mallory. Mallory was assigned to the 361st Station Hospital in Tokyo, which was responsible for nearby Sugamo Prison where Tojo was being held. Just one month after arriving in Japan in 1946, Mallory was handed a stupefying assignment: The architect of Japan’s war against the U.S. needed dentures, and Mallory was to make them for him.

Jack Mallory and his roommate, a dentist by the name of George Foster, were called to Sugamo Prison to examine Tojo, whose teeth were decaying and crumbling from his gums. “I knew I was going to meet an evil man," Mallory told Sierra Countis of the Chico News & Review in 2002. “It was a shock to see him. He was very humble and just a meek, little guy.”

Tojo had requested the dentures so he could speak for himself at his upcoming trial. He knew his execution was a foregone conclusion, so when Mallory suggested he get a full set of false teeth, Tojo declined and asked only for the top row—he wouldn’t be needing them for long and didn’t want to waste anybody's time.

Word of the assignment got out, and Mallory’s colleagues at the hospital egged him on to use the opportunity to pull off a legendary prank. He wanted to inscribe "Remember Pearl Harbor" on the dentures but knew such a conspicuous message would be caught easily. He decided to use Morse code instead, so he drilled the sentence into the row of false teeth as a series of dots and dashes.

Mallory and Foster always referred to it as a “prank” and not much more. “I figured it was my duty to carry out the assignment,” Foster recalled in 1988. “But that didn’t mean I couldn’t have fun with it.”

“It wasn’t anything done in anger,” Mallory told the AP in 1995. “It’s just that not many people had the chance to get those words into his mouth.”

The prank was meant to be kept secret, though news got out after someone at the dental service blabbed about it in a letter home, where the story traveled so fast that it even found its way onto a Texas radio broadcast.

With news of the deed now bouncing back to and around Tokyo, Mallory confessed to his supervisor before things could get more out of hand. “That’s funny as hell," Mallory recalled being told, "but we could get our asses kicked for doing it.” His supervisor ordered the men to undo their prank immediately.

Late one evening in February 1947—some three months after first inscribing "Remember Pearl Harbor" in Morse code into the false teeth—Mallory and Foster paid a visit to Tojo’s cell and asked the guard to wake him up. They needed to perform emergency work on his dentures, they said, and Mallory swiftly and discretely ground the hidden message off Tojo’s teeth. All reports indicate Tojo never knew it was ever there.

The next morning, a supremely pissed-off and high-ranking colonel called on Mallory and Foster to ask about the prank. With the evidence inside Tojo's mouth ground and sluiced away, the young dentists were able to soundly deny everything.

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Jack Mallory returned to the United States in 1947 and set up a dental practice in California that he ran for decades. Before he left Tokyo, however, he spent a day sitting in on Hideki Tojo’s trial. As Mallory recalled to the Chico News & Review, his former patient recognized him inside the courtroom, smiled, "pointed to his teeth and bowed toward him in thanks."

Tojo was able to speak for himself at his trial and took responsibility for Japan's actions during the war. He was found guilty and was hanged on December 23, 1948.

Jack Mallory passed away in 2013 at the age of 88. His online obituary includes stories of skiing and other outdoor adventures, plus a quick, vague aside about a "dental prank" performed on Hideki Tojo, "the 'mastermind' behind the attack of Pearl Harbor."

DNA Links Polish Barber Aaron Kosminski to Jack the Ripper Murders, But Experts Are Skeptical

Express Newspapers/Getty Images
Express Newspapers/Getty Images

Many people have been suspected of being Jack the Ripper, from author Lewis Carroll to Liverpool cotton salesman James Maybrick, but the perpetrator of the grisly crimes that gripped Victorian London has never been identified. Now, one of the case's first suspects is back in the news. As Smithsonian reports, Aaron Kosminski, a barber from Poland, has been linked to the Jack the Ripper murders with DNA evidence—but experts are hesitant to call the case closed.

The new claim comes from data now published in the Journal of Forensic Science. Several years ago, Ripperologist Russell Edwards asked researchers from the University of Leeds and John Moores University in Liverpool to analyze a blood-stained silk shawl thought to have belonged to Ripper victim Catherine Eddowes. The item, which Edwards owns, has been a primary piece of evidence in the murder investigation for years. In 2014, Edwards published a book in which he claimed Aaron Kosminski's DNA had been found on the garment, but his results weren't published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Five years later, the researchers have released their findings. Using infrared and spectrophotometry technology, they confirmed the fabric was stained with blood and discovered a possible semen stain. They collected DNA fragments from the stain and compared them to DNA taken from a descendent of Eddowes and a descendent of Kosminski. The mitochondrial DNA (the DNA passed down from mother to offspring) extracted from the shawl contained matching profiles for both subjects.

Kosminski was a 23-year-old Polish barber living in London at the time of the Jack the Ripper murders. He was one of the first suspects identified by the London police, but there wasn't enough evidence to convict him in 1888.

Following the newest study, many Jack the Ripper experts are saying there still isn't enough evidence to definitively pin the murders on Kosminski. One of the main issues is that a mitochondrial DNA match isn't as conclusive as matches with other DNA; many people have the same mitochondrial DNA profile, even if they're not related, so the forensic tool is best used for ruling out suspects rather than confirming them.

The shawl at the center of the study is also controversial. It was supposedly picked up by a police officer at the scene of Eddowes's murder, but that version of the story has been disputed. The shawl's origin also been traced back to multiple eras, including the early 1800s and early 1900s, as well as different parts of Europe.

Due to many factors complicating the Jack the Ripper case, the murders may never be solved completely. The crimes spurred a flurry of hoax letters to the London Police department in the 1880s, and even the letters that were thought to be authentic, like the one that gave Jack the Ripper his nickname, may have been fabricated.

[h/t Smithsonian]

Medgar Evers’s Mississippi Home Is Now a National Monument

Milt T, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Milt T, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The Mississippi home where civil rights leader and World War II veteran Medgar Evers lived at the time of his assassination has just been declared a national monument, the Clarion Ledger reports. The new designation was part of a sweeping bill signed by President Donald Trump that also established four other national monuments: one in Utah, one in California, and two in Kentucky.

The three-bedroom house in Jackson was already a national historic landmark as well as a stop on the Mississippi Freedom Trail. However, it now has the distinction of being known as the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument. Evers and his wife, Myrlie, moved into the home with their two children after Evers became Mississippi’s first NAACP field secretary in 1954. As an outspoken activist, he also staged boycotts and voter registration drives, and helped desegregate the University of Mississippi.

The couple welcomed their third child into the world while living in their Jackson home, but due to Evers’s high profile, they had to take extra precautions. The home doesn’t have a front door because Evers believed this small barrier would help protect his family (the door was located on the side of the house instead). It wasn’t enough to protect him, though. On June 12, 1963, Evers was shot in his driveway by Klansman Byron De La Beckwith. A bullet hole can still be seen in a kitchen wall.

Evers’s murder helped prompt the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, according to historians. Myrlie Evers also went on to play a crucial role in the movement, serving as national chairwoman of the NAACP from 1995 to 1998. “Medgar and Myrlie Evers are heroes whose contributions to the advancement of civil rights in Mississippi and our nation cannot be overstated,” said U.S. Senator Roger Wicker, who co-sponsored the proposal for the national monument.

Under this new change of management—from former owners Tougaloo College to the federal government—the home will receive more funds for its preservation. Currently, the home can only be toured by appointment.

[h/t Clarion Ledger]

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