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11 Brilliant Gifts for the Cat Lover in Your Life

Not sure what to get the ailurophile in your life (besides a lint roller or five)? Here are a few suggestions for lovers of all things cat—and their favorite felines.

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1. PETFUSION ULTIMATE CAT SCRATCHER LOUNGE; $50

To love a cat person is to love their cat. Show your appreciation for your favorite cat lover’s favorite feline with this scratcher/lounge, made of recycled corrugated cardboard.

Find it: Amazon

2. I LIKE CATS MORE THAN I LIKE PEOPLE PULLOVER; $35

It’s just true for your loved one who is an ailurophile. Help him or her send the world a clear message with the lightweight pullover in heathered gray.

Find it: Look Human

3. CAT BODY PILLOW; $80

The purrfect gift for people who can’t have a real cat (and the gift giver who can't afford a Cuddle Clone), this body pillow has dense “fur” that makes it super snuggly.

Find it: Plow & Hearth

4. FRISKIES PULL ‘N PLAY PACK; $11

Cats love real string, but can’t play with it unsupervised without risking serious medical consequences. Enter Friskies Pull ‘n Play: Owners insert edible strings into a wobbly toy that also dispenses treats, making playtime a safe, stimulating, and delicious experience. The Pull ‘n Play Pack comes with the dispenser, one pack of string, and a bag of treats; the string and treats can also be purchased separately.

Find it: Amazon

5. THE FIELD GUIDE TO FAMOUS FELINES; $29

This 18-inch-by-24-inch poster features 79 celebrity cats, from MC Skat Cat to Garfield.

Find it: Pop Chart Lab

6. KIKKERLAND CAT BUTT MAGNETS; $11

These magnets are a good reason to explain that cats sticking their butts in your face is actually a sign that they like you.

Get it: Amazon

7. MUSIC FOR CATS; $15 - $25

For the past six years, composer David Teie and psychologists from the University of Wisconsin have been creating music for specific species. The tunes they created for cats were tested on 47 felines, and according to their study published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science, the animals “showed a significant preference for and interest in species-appropriate music compared with human music.” Now, the scientists are releasing a full album of music for cats, which they’re funding via Kickstarter. The project has already far surpassed its goal—you have until November 28 to nab a digital copy ($15) or CD ($25) for the cat lover in your life; the estimated date of arrival is February 2016.

Find it: Kickstarter

8. MEWGAROO HOODIE; $84

This sweatshirt, created by Japanese company Unihabitat, features a feline-sized stomach pouch, plus long strings, equipped with fuzzy balls, to keep the cat in the pouch distracted for maximum cuddle time.

Find it: Amazon

9. YOU NEED MORE SLEEP: ADVICE FROM CATS; $8

This book—which features timeless and sound advice like “show you care with homemade gifts,” “don’t be nice to unpleasant people,” and “trust the person who feeds you regularly”—belongs on every cat enthusiast’s shelf.

Find it: Amazon

10. GAMA-GO KITTY EGG MOLD; $10

This cat-shaped egg mold makes plates much more adorable.

Find it: Sur La Table

11. PYROPET CANDLE; $35

Burning this cute cat-shaped candle, which lasts for 20 hours, will reveal a metal skeleton.

Find it: Amazon

BONUS: MAKE A DONATION IN THEIR NAME TO THE WWF OR A LOCAL SHELTER

What cat lover hasn’t expressed a desire to save all the kittens? According to the ASPCA, approximately 3.4 million cats end up in shelters every year, and the costs of running shelters are enormous. We suggest finding a local shelter and making a donation in your favorite cat lover’s name.

If big cats are more your favorite cat lover's speed, you can symbolically adopt tigers, ocelots, snow leopards, amur leopards, lions, cheetahs, clouded leopards, black jaguars, jaguars, lynxes, cougars, and leopards. For $25, the WWF will send a photo, adoption certificate, and fact sheet to the recipient; other levels include plush toys and gift bags.Your gift will support efforts to protect wildlife around the world.

Find it: World Wildlife Fund

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John Phillips, Getty Images
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Pop Culture
How The Crown Saved the Corgis
John Phillips, Getty Images
John Phillips, Getty Images

Corgis may be both Queen Elizabeth II and the internet’s favorite dog breed, but their longtime association with the former has actually proven detrimental to their popularity in England. So much so that, in 2009, the stout little furballs were added to the UK Kennel Club’s list of native breeds that were “at risk of extinction.” Now, The Telegraph reports, their numbers are rising—thanks in part to the popularity of Netflix’s The Crown.

According to The Telegraph, the Queen’s love of the corgi is partly what caused its dip in popularity, as they “have long been regarded as a breed for the elderly and the genteel upper middle class.” But The Crown’s revisiting of the royal family in the early days of Elizabeth II’s reign (and the years leading up to it) have shown the Queen in a new, and much more stylish, light—and her beloved breed has reaped the rewards. In just the past two months, since The Crown’s second season dropped on Netflix in December, the Kennel Club has seen enough interest in the breed to take them off the endangered list entirely.

The Crown has certainly been important in the resurgence of the corgi breed,” Kennel Club public relations manager David Robson said. “It has increased interest in the breed. Following the transmission of the second series, searches for the breed puppies on our website went up by 22 percent.”

The dogs have proven to be a hit with viewers, as well as their costars. Claire Foy and Matt Smith, who portrayed Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in the show’s first two seasons, admitted that when they’re filming with the series' dogs, it’s the corgis who steal the show.

“When we’re with the corgis, then all the shots are about the corgis and you have to fit your acting around what the corgis are doing,” Foy explained in an interview with Off Set. “Which is absolutely … fine. And is the way it should be quite frankly.”

But even before Netflix unleashed its pricey royal drama on the world, the Queen’s dogs were finding their way back into the spotlight. In 2011, shortly after Prince William married Kate Middleton, BBC reported that the Cardigan Welsh corgi (a sort of cousin to the Pembroke Welsh corgi that the Queen prefers, though the Kennel Club lumps them into one category) saw a registration increase of 134 percent, which the group chalked up to the “royal wedding effect.”

Interest in the breed surged again in 2015, when the Queen—who has owned 30 of the dogs during her life, beginning with her childhood pooch Dookie—announced that she would no longer breed the pups, as she did not want to leave any young dogs behind in the event of her death. Adding to their pop culture cachet: During their first official interview after announcing their engagement, Prince Harry admitted that part of the reason he knew wife-to-be Meghan Markle was “the one” was because “the corgis took to [her] straight away.”

[h/t: The Telegraph]

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BBC
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Animals
Watch a Cheetah Hunt Its Prey—From the Cheetah's Point of View
BBC
BBC

Even if you're a huge fan of wildlife documentaries, you've never seen a cheetah hunt quite like this. For PBS's latest Nature miniseries, Animals With Cameras, animal behaviorists strapped custom-made cameras on meerkats, seals, cheetahs, and more to capture never-before-seen footage.

"There's absolutely no way we could see this any other way," wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan says in the clip below, which follows a hunting cheetah as she and her siblings try to take down an eland, a type of antelope native to east and southern Africa.

A holster used to attach a camera to a cheetah's head
Isabel Rogers

The custom-made camera was strapped to the top of the cheetah's head, allowing it to record footage from the animal's point of view. The cameras were designed by Chris Watts of British Technical Films, a UK-based company that specializes in developing custom camera kits to capture wildlife and nature footage.

The cheetah-mounted cameras had to be extra-light, since the fast-moving predators were extremely sensitive to the device's weight. (As you, too, might be if you had a camera on your head while sprinting.) The straps that secured the camera had to allow enough airflow to keep the cat's head cool and be flexible enough that the animal could get the device off if it became too bothersome. And since running across the savannah at 70 mph can get a bit bumpy, the camera had to have stabilizing sensors to make the footage smooth, so it wouldn't make viewers queasy.

The result is a pretty spectacular scene following a cheetah from the moment it picks up the scent of its prey to the end of its hunt. Watch the full video below. We won't spoil how it ends.

The final episode of Animals With Cameras airs on February 14 at 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

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