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11 Meaty Facts About Arby's

Arby's may play to an older audience than other fast food chains, by it doesn't need a play-place to have a good time.

1. THERE IS NO "ARBY."

The name is a play on the letters 'R' and 'B.' And despite some claims that it’s an ode to their classic sandwich, it doesn’t stand for “roast beef.” Rather, RB stands for Raffel Brothers, a nod to founders Leroy and Forrest Raffel, who opened the first Arby’s in Boardman, Ohio, on July 23, 1964.

2. IT COULD HAVE BEEN CALLED "BIG TEX."

It’s not clear why—they weren’t in Texas and didn’t serve distinctly Southwestern food—but that was the name the brothers originally had in mind. There was already another business in nearby Akron, Ohio with that name, however, so Arby’s it was.

3. THE ORIGINAL MENU WAS VERY LIMITED—AND SURPRISINGLY EXPENSIVE (FOR THE TIME).

The brothers weren’t exactly sure what sort of food they wanted to serve when they left their jobs as restaurant equipment suppliers to follow the fast food trend. They were inspired late one night at a summer beach resort in Massachusetts. Even though it was dark and rainy, people were waiting in line for roast beef at a place called Kelly’s. The Raffels decided roast beef was the perfect open niche in the current fast food landscape. But while McDonalds was selling hamburgers for 15 cents, Arby’s roast beef sandwiches—one of just a few things on the menu—was more than four times that amount, at 69 cents. The brothers hoped that slightly higher-end restaurants would attract more of an adult crowd.

4. HANK AARON OWNED A BUNCH OF ARBY’S FRANCHISES.

In the late 1980s, the Hall-of-Fame slugger started purchasing franchise locations in the Milwaukee area, the town where he spent the majority of his baseball career. ''The most important thing that I want all of us to understand is that we are serving the public,'' he told his employees at the time. ''Whether customers buy one Coke or 15 sandwiches, they're all going to be treated the same way—with a smile and a 'thank you.’”

5. THEY’RE PRETTY HEALTH-CONSCIOUS, FOR A FAST FOOD CHAIN.

You might not think of Arby’s as the most nutritious place to dine out, but in the ‘90s, the company was first to make a couple of healthy changes. In 1991, it became the first fast food chain to debut a “lite” menu, featuring a series of salads with less than 300 calories. And in ’94, Arby’s became the first chain restaurant to ban smoking in all of its locations.

6. …BUT THEIR BEST SELLING NEW PRODUCT IS A BRISKET SANDWICH.

The menu has grown significantly since roast beef was the only sandwich available, and some additions have been more successful than others. According to Arby’s, the most successful new product in over 50 years of restaurant history is the smokehouse brisket sandwich, which they first introduced in the fall of 2014. The smoked brisket, smoked Gouda cheese, barbecue sauce, and crispy onions combo lifted “year-over-year same-store sales” more than 12 percent during the promotion.

7. WHEN ARBY’S ADVERTISED ALL THE MEAT ON THEIR MENU IN ONE AD, PEOPLE WANTED IT ON ONE SANDWICH.

As the menu evolved, Arby’s needed to advertise options beyond roast beef. To alert customers to the many protein offerings, Arby’s hung mouth-watering posters featuring the many meats on the menu—chicken tenders, roast turkey, ham, corned beef, brisket, Angus steak, bacon, and the old standby, roast beef.

“People started coming in and asking, ‘Can I have that?’” Christopher Fuller, the company’s vice president of brand and corporate communications, told The Washington Post of the ad, which showed all of the meats stacked neatly on top of each other.

The so-called “Meat Mountain” isn’t on the menu, but if you ask for it by name, the folks at Arby’s will put all that meat—plus Swiss and cheddar cheese—on a roll for you, for just $10.

8. THEY HOLD THE WORLD RECORD FOR LONGEST COMMERCIAL.

Last year, to prove that the smoked meat in their Smokehouse Brisket LTO sandwich is really smoked for 13 hours, Arby’s aired a commercial showing the whole process—all 13 hours. Viewers tuned in for an average of 39 minutes—not bad for a fast food commercial, considering television viewers sometimes can't make it through a 30-second commercial without fast-forwarding their DVR. The Guinness World Record-breaking ad actually played in full on a Duluth, Minnesota channel on a Saturday. To top it this year, the company gave out 500 six-DVD box sets, with all 13 hours of meat smoking plus a bonus eight hours of turkey action. Riveting.

9. ARBY’S BOUGHT PHARRELL’S HAT.

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During the 2014 Grammys, Twitter was abuzz with the idea that Pharrell Williams’s hat—a Vivienne Westwood design—looked an awful lot like the Arby’s logo (it even spawned its own Twitter account). After the show, the singer put the hat up for sale on eBay and Arby’s bought it for $44,100. All of the money was donated to children's charity From One Hand to Another, which helps kids learn through technology and the arts.

10. ARBY’S SOLD TONS OF FOOD OVER HALF A CENTURY.

All those sandwiches have added up. Since the first Arby’s opened in 1964, they’ve sold 5 billion classic roast beef sandwiches, 3.34 million pounds of corned beef, and about 1.37 million pounds of sauerkraut. And, presumably, gallons upon gallons of horsey sauce.

11. ARBY’S HAS A LOVE/HATE RELATIONSHIP WITH JON STEWART.

When Jon Stewart first started bashing the chain in 2013 on The Daily Show, executives at Arby’s were initially worried about the bad press. But pretty quickly they decided to roll with the punches, sending the Daily Show team a platter of sandwiches later that year and really embracing their “rivalry” when Stewart announced his retirement. The fast food chain featured prominently in the host’s final week this August, sponsoring an entire episode, airing custom commercials, and even sending their chief executive to appear in a taped send-off segment in the finale. In Stewart’s honor, Arby’s even introduced a secret, off-menu item called the Daily Deli: a double corned beef on rye (Stewart's favorite). Awww.

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Here’s Why Bells Are Always Ringing in Trader Joe’s
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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Trader Joe’s has attracted a devoted fan-base by doing things a little differently than your typical grocery store chain. But shoppers may not even realize that the company has done away with this ubiquitous supermarket feature.

As Business Insider recently noted, Trader Joe’s doesn’t use an intercom system. So instead of hearing “clean up in aisle 4” blaring overhead, customers shop to a soundtrack of ringing bells.

The nautical bells, which are situated at each register, are used by employees to communicate with one another. According to the company’s website, “blustery PA systems” didn’t fit the brand, so it borrowed inspiration from the maritime traders of a bygone era and developed its own Morse-like code.

If you hear one ring, that means an additional register needs to be opened. Two rings means that either a cashier or a customer has a question at checkout, and three signals a manager. The code isn’t exactly a secret as it’s available for anyone to find online, but memorizing it will definitely give you bit of intel most patrons don’t have. It can also be used to plan your shopping strategy. If you hear four bells, for instance, that means the store is getting crowded, so you should forget about grabbing that second bottle of Two-Buck Chuck and hustle to the checkout line.

[h/t Business Insider]

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13 Secrets of Professional Naming Consultants
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When it comes to companies and products, names matter. A slick name makes a company sound trendy and cool, while a terrible name can have customers running into the arms of the competition. Unsurprisingly, many companies take the process very seriously, hiring outside naming consultants who either work within creative agencies or at agencies devoted entirely to naming. We got a few to give us the scoop on how their job really works.

1. IT’S NOT JUST A CREATIVE TASK.

“The notion that namers are hippies and poets jotting down names on cocktail napkins couldn’t be farther from the truth,” says Mark Skoultchi, a partner at Catchword, the agency that named the Fitbit Flex and Force and Starbucks’s Refreshers line.

The stakes are just too high for naming to be a purely creative project, because a bad name can break a product. Consider, for example, the major slump in sales ISIS chocolates experienced in 2014 when people began to associate their name with the Islamic State. (The company rebranded itself to Libeert.) And when the AIDS crisis hit in the 1980s, the diet candy company Ayds chose not to change its name, eventually suffering the consequences. (When asked about it, an official from its parent company, Jeffrey Martin, famously snapped, “Let the disease change its name.”) By 1988, the company conceded that the name was hurting sales, and changed it to Diet Ayds. But the product was soon pulled from shelves altogether.

“When you’re naming your kid or nicknaming your car it’s more creative. There aren’t as many consequences,” says Nina Beckhardt, founder and CEO of the Naming Group, a consultancy that works with Chevrolet, Kohler, and Capital One. “But when you’re brand naming, the name you select has to be strategically impeccable. It has to make sense and at least not offend millions of people around the globe.”

2. NAMES CAN’T JUST SOUND GOOD.

Naming isn’t just a subjective choice—really liking a name doesn’t mean it’s a good fit for your company. “People want to get more subjective with it,” Beckhardt says. “They’ll say that name reminds me of my cat or rhymes with such and such. That observation is so enormously unimportant compared with the fact that the name successfully checks all the boxes we created at the beginning.” The point is to find a name that gets across what the company wants to convey, rather than one that every person involved in the naming process loves.

For example, when The Naming Group was working with Capital One to develop their first brand-name rewards credit card, the company had to consider who they were trying to target—travelers. The result was the Venture card, a name with a connotation of adventure and exploration that’s “not right on the nose.”

3. IT HELPS TO HAVE A BACKGROUND IN LINGUISTICS—OR TRADEMARK LAW.

Though naming is essentially an exercise in corporate strategy, naming agencies don’t just employ people with backgrounds in branding and marketing. They also need linguistics experts to help generate names that make sense, have positive connotations in modern usage (i.e. nothing that might have a negative slang meaning), and inspire the associations the company wants to elicit.

Coming up with a name also involves some legal legwork. You can’t name your company or product after something that’s already trademarked. And if you want to expand internationally, the name needs to be available to trademark in other countries as well. That means naming agencies are often looking for people with a background in trademark law.

4. YOU HAVE TO COME UP WITH HUNDREDS OF NAMES, IF NOT THOUSANDS.

“Naming is a game of numbers,” Beckhardt says. “You have to have a lot of options.” Even if the potential names sound great, many are bound to run into trademark conflicts or not work in another language.

So before namers get together to present feasible ideas to the clients they’re working with, they come up with hundreds, if not thousands, of potential options. “At Catchword, 200 names is scratching the surface,” Skoultchi says.

5. BUT THE CLIENT WON’T SEE THEM ALL.

When faced with too many options to choose from, people tend to freeze up in what psychologists call “choice overload” [PDF]. Whether you’re talking about choosing between similar items at the grocery store or an endless array of potential product names, it’s overwhelming to consider all the possibilities. Namers take their initial 200 or 1000 ideas and whittle them down to present only the best (and most feasible) options. At Catchword, that means about 50 names.

But namers can also face the opposite challenge. If a client gets too set on a single idea, it blinds them to what might be better options still out there. “For each project I will get and try to get the client attached to a number of different names,” Beckhardt says, rather than looking for “the prince charming” of names.

6. A NAME CAN BE TOO ORIGINAL

The amount of meaning a name communicates lies along a continuum. On the one end, there’s an overly descriptive name. On the other end, there’s so-called “empty vessel” names, which are so far removed from actual words that they come off as meaningless. The ideal name falls somewhere in the middle, but if you end up too far toward the “empty vessel” side, your name will be a target for mockery.

Consider Tribune Publishing, the media company that owns the Chicago Tribune. In 2016, it rebranded as “tronc,” a name derived from the phrase “Tribune online content.” The move was widely mocked, for good reason. In The New York Times, a branding expert said the name “creates an ugliness.” The new name became a black eye for the company rather than a sign of its forward-thinking vision.

Empty vessel names are particularly common in the tech world, but played right, it can work. Google could be considered an empty vessel name, but it does have an origin, albeit one that most people aren’t familiar with. A googol is a huge number—10100—which makes sense within the context of the search engine’s ability to aggregate results from a near-infinite number of sources online.

7. A NAME CAN’T JUST SOUND GOOD IN ENGLISH.

One reason naming agencies need linguists is that unless a company is only marketing its products domestically, the name needs to work in multiple languages. If your product sounds slick in English but means something dirty in Norwegian, you’ve got a problem.

Plenty of companies have found this out the hard way. The Honda Fit was almost the Honda Fitta, but the company changed the name when it realized that “fitta” was slang for female genitalia in Swedish. The company later started calling it the Honda Jazz outside of North America.

Different languages also pronounce certain letters differently, which gets awkward if you’re not careful. “When we’re developing names we have to prepare for those mispronunciations to make sure that isn’t going to affect how people understand the product,” Beckhardt says. In Germany, Vicks sells its products under the name Wick, because the German pronunciation of the original brand name (in which a “v” is pronounced like an “f”) sounds like a slang word for sex.

Even if the name isn’t vulgar, it might have connotations in another language that you don’t want people associating with your product. In Mandarin, Microsoft’s Bing has to go by a different name, because “bing” means disease. Part of the naming process, according to Beckhardt, is “making sure that if we’re naming a skin care product, it doesn’t mean acne in Japanese.” She adds that at one point, while working on a rebranding project, The Naming Group came up with a name that ended up meaning “pubic hair” in another language.

8. IF YOU DON’T COME UP WITH A FOREIGN NAME, CUSTOMERS MIGHT DO IT FOR YOU.

Famously, when Coca-Cola first started selling its products in China in 1927, it didn’t immediately come up with a new name that made sense in Chinese characters. Instead, shopkeepers transliterated the name Coca-Cola phonetically on their signage, leading to odd meanings like “bite the wax tadpole.” In 1928, Coke registered a Chinese trademark for the Mandarin 可口可乐 (K'o K'ou K'o Lê), which the company translates as “to permit mouth to be able to rejoice.”

9. COMING UP WITH A CHINESE NAME IS ESPECIALLY COMPLICATED.

Foreign companies are eager to expand into China’s growing market, but it’s not as easy as transliterating an American name, like LinkedIn, to Chinese characters. In some cases, companies use Chinese names that sound somewhat like their English equivalent, but in others, they go by names that don’t sound similar at all. “It’s this crazy art form of balancing phonic similarity and actual meaning,” Beckhardt says.

Labbrand, a consultancy founded in Shanghai, helps American companies come up with names that work for Chinese markets. For LinkedIn’s Chinese name, Labbrand was able to come up with a name that both sounded a bit like the original and still had a meaning in line with the company’s purpose. 领英 (lǐng yīng) means “leading elite.” For other companies, though, it makes more sense to come up with a name that sounds nothing like the American brand, yet has a strategic meaning. For Trip Advisor, Labbrand came up with “猫途鹰 (māo tú yīng)," a combination of the characters for "owl" and "journey"—a reference to the company’s owl logo and its role as a travel site.

Some names, however, are just straight translations. Microsoft is 微软 (weiruan), two characters that literally mean “micro” and “soft.”

10. THERE ISN'T USUALLY AN ‘A-HA’ MOMENT.

“Oftentimes, clients are expecting epiphany, to have an ‘a-ha!’ moment, but those moments are more rare than you think,” Skoultchi says. “It’s not because the name ideas aren't great, it’s because most people have trouble imagining” what the names will sound like in the real world. “Context, visual identity, taglines, copy, and other factors influence our perception of a name and how appealing it is. Imagine just about any modern blockbuster brand, and now imagine it’s just a word on a page, in Helvetica, with little to no marketing support.”

To help customers understand how a name might look in real-world settings, Catchword gives it a slightly jazzier graphic design that’s more representative of what it would look like in the market, adding in potential taglines and ad copy to make it look more realistic.

11. YOU’RE NOT JUST NAMING ONE THING.

The Naming Group, for example, has worked with Capital One, Kohler, and Reebok to come up with names for multiple products, and they've also worked to establish perimeters for future names. That's because what you call one product could have implications for your future products—and ideally, the names of different products across a company should work together.

Take the example of Fitbit. The company has a naming style that involves single-syllable, simple English words that are designed to convey something unique about the product. They also had to fit the tiny devices themselves, so length mattered. The name “Flex” went to the first wristband tracker, and the most advanced tracker became “Force.” Later, the first tracker that measured heart rate would become "Charge," and the one designed for high-intensity athletes, "Blaze." All the names have a similar vibe while managing to convey something about the specific device.

As a cautionary tale, imagine a world in which Steve Jobs was allowed to use his preferred name for the iMac, “MacMan.” (Luckily, an ad agency creative director talked him out of it.) Given how the “i” in iMac influenced Apple’s future naming conventions, would there later have been a PodMan and PhoneMan? Choosing the iMac led to a larger branding scheme—the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad—that's instantly recognizable. “The PhoneMan” just wouldn’t have the same ring.

12. COMPANIES OFTEN WAIT UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE.

There’s a perception that naming should come from within a company—that if you build a product, you automatically know the best thing to call it. But that’s often not the case. Companies usually don’t employ professional namers on staff and don’t have any set guidelines on how to come up with new names. And it’s often not until the last minute that they realize they need outside help to decide on a great moniker. “It can be so emotional,” Beckhardt explains. “Companies come to you pulling their hair out, [saying] ‘We just can’t decide; we haven’t found it yet.’”

13. IT ONLY TAKES A FEW WEEKS.

Naming something usually doesn’t involve a lightning bolt of inspiration, but neither do companies slave over names for months. According to Beckhardt, the process takes anywhere from four to six weeks, though they can expedite the process if they really need to.

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