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10 Hotels Where You Can Live Like James Bond

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Spectre, the 24th installment in the James Bond franchise, hit theaters this weekend, which means that bartenders around the world are going to have to deal with an onslaught of requests for shaken martinis. While it's unlikely that you'd ever have the superspy skills or high-tech gadgetry to compete with 007, you can try to match his passport game. To get you started, here are some of the secret agent's favorite hotels around the world, as seen on the silver screen.

1. FOUR SEASONS LONDON AT CANARY WHARF

In the opening scene of 2012's Skyfall (seen above), Bond takes a dip in a pool that is supposed to be located at a hotel in Shanghai. In reality, he's paddling high above the Thames. And while the real pool offers amazing aerial views of London, the filmmakers had to black out the windows in order to keep up the China illusion. Bond's steamy shower scene with Severine (Bérénice Marlohe) was reportedly shot in room 712 of the hotel, so keep that in mind when making a reservation.

2. FONTAINEBLEAU MIAMI BEACH

Fontainebleau Miami Beach

Opened in 1954, Miami Beach's historic Fontainebleau is one of the most memorable hotels used throughout the Bond film franchise; it’s shown immediately following the opening credits of Goldfinger (1964), and is also where the titular villain (Auric Goldfinger) passes the time cheating at cards. In the film, Goldfinger's assistant/Bond Girl Jill Masterson is found dead (and covered in gold paint) in one of the hotel’s rooms, but only the aerial shots were actually filmed there; parts of the hotel were recreated at Pinewood Studios in England. Other films that have cast the luxury resort as a character include The Bodyguard (1992) and Scarface (1983).

3. ONE & ONLY OCEAN CLUB 

One&Only Ocean Club

The bulk of Casino Royale (2006) takes place at this Paradise Island resort: Bond walks through the reception area and gardens and plays poker in the Library. The lobby of the club was transformed into a set for the film, and according to the BBC, guests can stay in Bond’s room (Villa 1085), which comes with round-the-clock butler service. Dune, the hotel's oceanfront Jean-Georges Vongerichten restaurant and bar, pays tribute to its Bond link with a Casino Royale martini (a simple mix of Grey Goose vodka, Bombay Sapphire gin, Lillet Blanc, and lemon).

4. HOTEL ATLANTIC KEMPINSKI 

By Hochgeladen am 30. Juli 2007 von Petra Kohlstädt [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Pierce Brosnan (as Bond) get a bird's-eye view of Hamburg, Germany in Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) as he climbs his way to the globe that famously adorns the rooftop of the Hotel Atlantic Kempinksi. The façade of the building, which was built in 1909, also appears throughout the film, as it was Bond's hotel of choice; conveniently, it was Brosnan's hotel while filming, too.

5. COUPLES SANS SOUCI

Couples Sans Souci

Jamaica was a recurring destination for Bond during the 1960s and 1970s. What is now the Couples Sans Souci resort was used as a location in three Bond movies: Dr. No (1962), Goldfinger (1964), and Live and Let Die (1973). Bond's connection to the famed Caribbean island is hardly coincidental: Ian Fleming penned all of the Bond novels in Jamaica, where he owned 15 acres of land that he dubbed GoldenEye. Today that area is its own hotel (still called GoldenEye) where guests can stay in Fleming's own villa.

6. THE PENINSULA HONG KONG

The Peninsula Hong Kong

In The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), Roger Moore follows Bond Girl Andrea Anders to Hong Kong, where she’s picked up by one of the Peninsula Hong Kong's iconic “Peninsula green” Rolls-Royce Phantoms. Founded in 1928, the five-star Peninsula Hotel group is based in China but now has 10 locations around the world with others under construction. The exterior of The Peninsula Hong Kong appears throughout the movie, and the cast and crew were lucky enough to stay there during filming.

7. BELMOND HOTEL CIPRIANI

Belmond Hotel Cipriani/Facebook

In Casino Royale (2006), Bond docks his yacht at the private marina of this Venice hotel (the only way guests can arrive), offering an amazing shot of the Venetian island palace’s exterior. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the hotel has appeared on a few “Most Expensive” lists, with suites starting around $1200 per night. The cast and crew stayed here during filming (and George Clooney and Amal Alamuddin were spotted here during their wedding weekend).

8. HOTEL NEW OTANI TOKYO 

Hotel New Otani Tokyo

This Tokyo hotel doubles as the headquarters of Osato Chemicals and Engineering, a front for the global crime syndicate SPECTRE, in You Only Live Twice (1967). At the time of filming, the hotel was basically brand new (it opened in 1964), and was designed to house 1000 guests and to give each one of them a view of Mount Fuji. A section of the hotel, called “The Main,” received major renovations against seismic activity and reopened in 2007.

9. STOKE PARK COUNTRY CLUB, SPA & HOTEL 

Stoke Park/Facebook

This Buckinghamshire estate is a popular filming location in England, having appeared in both Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) and, more famously, Goldfinger (1964), where Bond faces off with the gold magnate and his henchman, Oddjob, on the golf course. The country club has also appeared in Bridget Jones’ Diary (2001), Layer Cake (2004), RocknRolla (2008), and other films.

10. TAJ LAKE PALACE UDAIPUR 

Taj Lake Palace Hotel/Facebook

The lavish 18th-century Indian hotel, often referred to as a “floating palace,” was used as the location of the jewel-smuggling mastermind’s lair in Octopussy (1983). It is consistently named one of India’s “Most Romantic Hotels,” and it’s not hard to see why.

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15 Fascinating Facts About Candyman
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Helen Lyle (Virginia Madsen) is a Chicago graduate student with a deep fascination with urban legends, which she and her friend Bernadette (Kasi Lemmons) are using as the basis for a thesis project. After they stumble across the local legend of Candyman, a well-to-do black artist who fell in love with a white woman in the late 1800s and was murdered for it, Helen wants to learn more. When she’s told that Candyman still haunts Chicago's Cabrini-Green housing project, and that his spirit can be summoned by repeating his name into a mirror five times, Helen does just that … and all hell breaks loose.

What began as a low-budget indie film has morphed into a contemporary classic of the horror genre, and essential Halloween viewing. In 1992, English filmmaker Bernard Rose—who got his start working as a gopher on The Muppet Show—turned Clive Barker’s short story “The Forbidden” into Candyman, which was released in theaters 25 years ago today. In honor of the film’s anniversary, here are 15 things you might not have known about Candyman.

1. EDDIE MURPHY WAS CONSIDERED FOR THE LEAD.

Though the role of Candyman turned Tony Todd into a horror icon, he wasn’t the only actor in consideration for the film’s title role: Eddie Murphy was also reportedly a contender for the part. Though it’s unclear exactly why he wasn’t cast, sources have reported that it had to do with everything from his height (at 5 feet 9 inches, he wouldn’t seem nearly as intimidating as the 6-foot-5 Todd) to his salary demands.

2. AN UNEXPECTED PREGNANCY LANDED VIRGINIA MADSEN THE LEAD.

Virginia Madsen stars in 'Candyman'
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

When asked by HorrorNewsNetwork about how she got the role of Helen in Candyman, Virginia Madsen shared that it was almost by accident: She was supposed to play Bernie, Helen’s friend and classmate, the role that eventually went to Kasi Lemmons.

“I was actually very good friends with Bernard [Rose] and his wife Alexandra,” Madsen said. “She is a wonderful actress, who actually brought Clive Barker’s short story ‘The Forbidden’ to her husband. She thought this would be a great film, and he could direct her. She was supposed to be Helen. I was going to play [Kasi Lemmons'] part, until they made the character African American. Then I was out.

“Right before shooting, Alexandra found out she was pregnant. It was great for me, but it was so sad for her because this was her role; she found this story and really wanted it. So when I was asked to step in I felt like ‘I can’t take my friend’s role.’ She actually came over one day and said ‘It would just kill me to see someone else play this role, you have to be the one who plays it.’ So with her blessing I took on the role. I really tried to work my butt off just to honor her.”

3. IT COULD HAVE STARRED SANDRA BULLOCK.

On the film’s DVD commentary, producer Alan Poul said that had Madsen been unable to step into the role of Helen, the part would have likely been offered to Sandra Bullock, who was still a relative unknown actress at that point. Though she had played the role of Tess McGill in the television adaptation of Working Girl, she was still a couple of years away from Speed (1994), the role that launched her into stardom.

4. ITS OPENING SHOT WAS GROUNDBREAKING.

The film’s opening credits feature a great aerial view of Chicago, which was pretty revolutionary for its time. “We did that with an incredible new machine called the Skycam, which can shoot up to a 500mm lens with no vibration,” Rose told The Independent. “You've never seen that shot before, at least not done that smoothly.”

5. NOT ALL OF THE FILM’S CREEPY DETAILS SPRUNG FROM CLIVE BARKER’S IMAGINATION.

While investigating one of Candyman’s crime scenes, Helen and Bernie discover that the design of the apartment’s medicine cabinet made it a possible point of entry for an intruder. This was not a made-up piece of horror movie fiction. While researching the film, Rose learned that a series of murders had been committed in Chicago in this very way.

6. BERNARD ROSE SEES CANDYMAN AS A ROMANTIC FIGURE.

Tony Todd stars in 'Candyman'
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

Viewers may think of Candyman as one of the horror genre’s most terrifying villains, but Rose said that “the idea always was that he was kind of a romantic figure. And again, romantic in sort of the Edgar Allan Poe sense—it's the romance of death. He's a ghost, and he's also the resurrection of something that is kind of unspoken or unspeakable in American history, which is slavery, as well. So he's kind of come back and he's haunting what is the new version of the racial segregation in Chicago.

“And I think there's also something very seductive and very sweet and very romantic about him, and that's what makes him interesting. In the same way there is about Dracula. In the end, the Bogeyman is someone you want to surrender to. You're not just afraid of. There's a certain kind of joy in his seduction. And Tony was always so romantic. Tony ties him in so elegantly and is such a gentleman. He was wonderful.”

7. THE BEES IN THE FILM WERE BRED SPECIFICALLY TO APPEAR ONSCREEN.

No, that is not CGI! The bees that play a key role in Candyman are indeed real. So that they looked appropriately terrifying, but were less dangerous to the cast and crew, the filmmakers used newborn bees—they were just 12 hours old—so that they looked fully grown, but had less powerful stingers.

8. TONY TODD WAS STUNG 23 TIMES, AND GOT A BONUS EACH TIME IT HAPPENED.

Photo of Tony Todd in 'Candyman'
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

In addition to allowing the filmmakers to cover his face with bees, Todd actually agreed to film a scene in which he had a mouthful of bees—and that, too, was all real. He told TMZ that he wore a dental dam to prevent any bees from sliding into his throat—which doesn’t mean that he didn’t suffer a sting or two … or 23, to be exact, over the course of three Candyman movies. Though it might have been worth it. “I had a great lawyer,” he told TMZ. “A thousand dollars a pop.”

9. THE BEES WEREN’T GREAT NEWS FOR MADSEN, EITHER.

Madsen, too, had to get up close and personal with those bees—a fact that almost forced her to pass on the role. “When Bernie was first asking me to do the role I said, ‘Well, I can’t. I’m allergic to bees,’” she told HorrorNewsNetwork. “He said ‘No you’re not allergic to bees, you’re just afraid.’ So I had to go to UCLA and get tested because he didn’t believe [me]. I was tested for every kind of venom. I was far more allergic to wasps. So he said, ‘We’ll just [have] paramedics there, it will be fine!’ You know actors, we’ll do anything for a paycheck! So fine, I’ll be covered with bees.

“So we a had a bee wrangler and he pretty much told us you can’t freak out around the bees, or be nervous, or swat at them, it would just aggravate them. They used baby bees on me. They can still sting you, but are less likely. When they put the bees on me it was crazy because they have fur. They felt like little Q-tips roaming around on me. Then you have pheromones on you, so they’re all in love with you and think you’re a giant queen. I really just had to go into this Zen sort of place and the takes were very short. What took the longest was getting the bees off of us. They had this tiny ‘bee vacuum,’ which wouldn’t harm the bees. After the scene where the bees were all over my face and my head, it took both Tony and I 45 minutes just to get the bees off. That’s when it became difficult to sit still. It was cool though, I felt like a total badass doing it.”

10. PHILIP GLASS COMPOSED THE SCORE, BUT WAS DISAPPOINTED IN THE MOVIE.

When Philip Glass signed on to compose the score for Candyman, he apparently envisioned the final film being something totally different. According to Rolling Stone, “What he'd presumed would be an artful version of Clive Barker's short story ‘The Forbidden’ had ended up, in his view, a low-budget slasher.” Glass was reportedly disappointed in the film, and felt that he had been manipulated. Still, the haunting music is considered a classic score—and Glass’s own view of it seems to have softened over time. “It has become a classic, so I still make money from that score, get checks every year,” he told Variety in 2014.

11. MANY OF THE FILM'S SCENES WERE SHOT AT CABRINI-GREEN.

In 2011, the last remaining high-rise in the Cabrini-Green housing project was demolished. Over the years, the property—which opened in 1942—gained a notorious reputation around the world for being a haven for violence, drugs, gangs, and other criminal activities. While the project’s real-life history weaves its way into the narrative of Candyman, it only makes sense that Rose would want to shoot there. Which he did. But in order to gain permission to shoot there, he had to agree to cast some of the residents as extras.

“I went to Chicago on a research trip to see where it could be done and I was shown around by some people from the Illinois Film Commission and they took me to Cabrini-Green,” Rose said. “And I spent some time there and I realized that this was an incredible arena for a horror movie because it was a place of such palpable fear. And rule number one when you're making a horror movie is set it somewhere frightening. And the fear of the urban housing project, it seemed to me, was actually totally irrational because you couldn't really be in that much danger. Yes, there was crime there, but people were actually afraid of driving past it. And there was such an aura of fear around the place and I thought that was really something interesting to look into because it's sort of a kind of fear that's at the heart of modern cities. And obviously, it's racially motivated, but more than that—it's poverty motivated.”

12. THE FILM’S PRODUCERS WERE WORRIED THAT THE FILM WOULD BE CONSIDERED RACIST.

During pre-production, Candyman’s producers began to worry that the film might draw criticism for being racist, given that its villain was black and it was largely set in an infamous housing project. “I had to go and have a whole set of meetings with the NAACP, because the producers were so worried,” Rose told The Independent. “And what they said to me when they'd read the script was 'Why are we even having this meeting? You know, this is just good fun.' Their argument was 'Why shouldn't a black actor be a ghost? Why shouldn't a black actor play Freddy Krueger or Hannibal Lecter? If you're saying that they can't be, it's really perverse. This is a horror movie.'”

13. STILL, SOME FILMMAKERS COMPLAINED THAT IT WAS RACIST.

In a 1992 story in the Chicago Tribune, some high-profile black filmmakers expressed their disappointment that the film seemed to perpetuate several racist stereotypes. “There’s no question that this film plays on white middle-class fears of black people,” director Carl Franklin (Out of Time, Devil in a Blue Dress) said. “It unabashedly uses racial stereotypes and destructive myths to create shock. I found it hokey and unsettling. It didn't work for me because I don’t share those fears, buy into those myths.”

Reginald Hudlin, who directed House Party, Boomerang, and Marshall, described the film as “worrisome,” though he didn’t want to speak on the record about his specific issues with the film. “I've gotten calls about [the movie], but I think I'm going to reserve comment,” he said. “Some of my friends are in it and I may someday want to work for TriStar.”

For Rose, those assessments may have been hard to hear, as his goal in adapting Barker’s story and directing it was to upend the myths about inner cities. “[T]he tradition of oral storytelling is very much alive, especially when it's a scary story,” he told The Independent. “And the biggest urban legend of all for me was the idea that there are places in cities where you do not go, because if you go in them something dreadful will happen—not to say that there isn't danger in ghettos and inner city areas, but the exaggerated fear of them is an urban myth.”

14. IT’S STILL THE ROLE THAT MADSEN IS MOST RECOGNIZED FOR (ESPECIALLY AT AIRPORTS).

Kasi Lemmons and Virginia Madsen in 'Candyman'
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

Though she earned a Best Supporting Actress nomination in 2005 for Alexander Payne’s Sideways, in 2012 Madsen said that Candyman is still the role she is most recognized for—especially at airports.

“More people recognize me from that movie than anything I’ve done,” she told HorrorNewsNetwork. “It means a lot to me. It was after years of struggling. As an actor, you always want a film that’s annual, like It’s a Wonderful Life or A Christmas Story. I just love that I have a Halloween movie. Now it’s kind of legend this story. People have watched it since they were kids, and every Halloween it’s on, and they watch it now with their kids. That means a lot to me. The place I get recognized the most is the airport security for some reason. Every person in airport security has seen Candyman. Maybe it makes them a little afraid of me.”

15. THERE WAS AN ACTUAL CANDYMAN KILLER.

Though the Chicago-based legend of Candyman is a work of fiction, there was an actual serial killer known as “Candyman” or “The Candy Man.” Between 1970 and 1973, Dean Corll kidnapped, tortured, and murdered at least 28 young boys in the Houston area. Corll earned his sweet nickname from the fact that his family owned a candy factory.

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Grand Central Terminal is Hosting a Film Festival of its Own Cameos
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Even if you’ve never set foot in New York City, chances are you’re intimately familiar with Grand Central Terminal. A sprawling, architecturally awesome railway station located on East 42nd Street in Manhattan, it’s been a favorite of Hollywood location scouts since its first onscreen appearance in the 1930 musical Puttin’ on the Ritz.

According to Times Square Chronicles, the terminal is now set to host an event worthy of its rich cinematic history: a film festival. On Thursday, October 19, screenings in the terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall will include clips from some of its most notable movie appearances. The show will culminate in a feature-length presentation of Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 classic North by Northwest, notable for a scene in which star Cary Grant eludes his pursuers by making his way through Grand Central.

The Museum of the Moving Image and Rooftop Films are collaborating on the special event, titled Grand Central Cinema. North by Northwest begins at 7:30 p.m., but that ticketed admission is already sold out and the waiting list is at capacity. Fortunately, the montage of clips will play all day from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Historians will also be giving presentations of the site's history on screen throughout the program. Admission is free.

[h/t Times Square Chronicles]

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