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10 Friendly Facts About the Golden Retriever

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It’s no mystery why these fluffy pooches are so popular. The well-mannered, fun-loving dogs are a hit with children and adults alike. Learn more about their history.

1. THEY WERE BRED TO RETRIEVE. 

Dudley Marjoribanks, first Lord Tweedmouth, in Scotland is credited for creating the golden retriever. The lord wanted a dog with a natural love of the water and inclination to retrieve the game he shot while hunting. In 1865 he purchased Nous, a yellow dog in a litter of black wavy-coated retrievers. He bred Nous with Belle, a Tweed water spaniel that he acquired from his cousin. After two litters, the couple produced four yellow retrievers—Crocus, Primrose, Cowslip, and Ada—that would become the ancestors of the dogs we know today. Later on, red setters and tan-colored bloodhounds were also introduced to the bloodline.

2. EGGS ARE SAFE WITH THEM.

Goldens have “soft mouths,” meaning they can carry things in their chops without damaging them—an important skill for canines tasked with retrieving their masters' hunting trophies. They’re so gentle, in fact, that some can be trained to hold a raw egg in their mouths without breaking it. 

3. THEY COULD GIVE EMILY POST A RUN FOR HER MONEY. 

Golden retrievers are some of the most mild-mannered and obedient dogs around. The first three dogs to ever achieve the AKC obedience champion title were all golden retrievers. 

4. THEY DO WELL IN LEADERSHIP ROLES.

The small town of Idyllwild, California is non-incorporated and has no human mayor. Instead, the organization Idyllwild Animal Rescue Friends (ARF) sponsored an election to put either a cat or dog in charge. Each vote came in the form of a $1 donation to the ARF. The good people of Idyllwild had to choose between 14 dogs and two cats to be their furry leader. In 2012, Max (Maximus Mighty-Dog Mueller), a 12-year-old golden retriever, was sworn into office. Sadly, the old dog passed away in his sleep from cancer in 2013. He was replaced by a stuffed animal until they could find a Max II. When this second Max stepped in, he was accompanied by his entourage: two other dogs named Mikey and Mitzi. The triumvirate is affectionately known as the "the Mayor and the spares" or simply "the Mayors of Idyllwild." 

5. THEY KNOW HOW TO PARTY. 

In 2006, the Golden Retriever Club of Scotland hosted a festival to mark their 50th anniversary. Nearly 200 golden retrievers from all over the world came to enjoy the festivities, making it the largest group of the dogs ever photographed in one place. That record was broken in 2013 when 222 dogs appeared for that year’s ceremony. Dogs and owners alike were able to frolic and enjoy each other’s company. You can see some highlights from the event here

6. THEY’RE POPULAR. 

According to the AKC, the golden retriever is the third-most popular dog breed in the U.S., right behind the German shepherd and the Labrador retriever. It’s not hard to see why: These friendly dogs are great with families, don’t have bad breath, and don't bark much.  

7. TURKEY ONCE CONSIDERED THEM A STATUS SYMBOL. 

It's easy to become infatuated with the allure of the golden retriever—its silky, gold fur and elegant frame suggest luxury. But at the end of the day, they're dogs who need to be loved and cherished—not an accessory that can be worn or thrown away. For a time, golden retrievers were a status symbol in Istanbul, Turkey, but the dogs were frequently abandoned when the novelty wore off. As a result, shelters in Turkey are working with Adopt a Golden Atlanta to help relocate goldens given up by their families to forever homes. So far, the organization has saved over 94 goldens. 

8. THEY MAKE GREAT ACTORS. 

Golden retrievers are well behaved and easily trained, so they’re naturals on set. One particularly talented pooch named Buddy stole the hearts of millions in the ‘90s by playing both Comet on Full House and Buddy in Air Bud. (Internet, consider this your official invitation to create the Full House/Air Bud mashup we never knew we needed.)  

9. THEY’RE SMART. 

Based on the AKC's official rankings, the golden retriever is the fourth-most intelligent dog breed—right behind the German shepherd and just ahead of the Doberman pinscher. 

10. THEY’RE RIGHT AT HOME IN THE WHITE HOUSE. 

While living in the White House, President Gerald Ford had a golden retriever named Liberty. She came from Minneapolis, and was originally named Streaker. The pampered pooch had a live-in trainer and even gave birth inside the White House. Liberty received a lot of fan mail, which was answered by Ford’s daughter Susan (she also answered fan mail sent to their Siamese cat Shan). Eventually, Ford’s secretary began mailing back “signed” pictures of the president and his dog with an inked paw print on the side. The paw print signatures were originally the real deal, but as requests increased, they had to switch to a rubber stamp. (It's hard work being the First Dog.)

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Scatterbrained
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Dogs
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Dogs: They’re cute, they’re cuddly … and they can smell fear!

Today on Scatterbrained, John Green and friends go beyond the floof to reveal some fascinating facts about our canine pals—including the story of one Bloodhound who helped track down 600 criminals during his lifetime. (Move over, McGruff.) They’re also looking at the name origins of some of your favorite dog breeds, going behind the scenes of the Puppy Bowl, and dishing the details on how a breed gets to compete at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

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Animals
Sploot 101: 12 Animal Slang Words Every Pet Parent Should Know
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For centuries, dogs were dogs and cats were cats. They did things like bark and drink water and lay down—actions that pet parents didn’t need a translator to understand.

Then the internet arrived. Scroll through the countless Facebook groups and Twitter accounts dedicated to sharing cute animal pictures and you’ll quickly see that dogs don’t have snouts, they have snoots, and cats come in a colorful assortment of shapes and sizes ranging from smol to floof.

Pet meme language has been around long enough to start leaking into everyday conversation. If you're a pet owner (or lover) who doesn’t want to be out of the loop, here are the terms you need to know.

1. SPLOOT

You know your pet is fully relaxed when they’re doing a sploot. Like a split but for the whole body, a sploot occurs when a dog or cat stretches so their bellies are flat on the ground and their back legs are pointing behind them. The amusing pose may be a way for them to take advantage of the cool ground on a hot day, or just to feel a satisfying stretch in their hip flexors. Corgis are famous for the sploot, but any quadruped can do it if they’re flexible enough.

2. DERP

Person holding Marnie the dog.
Emma McIntyre, Getty Images for ASPCA

Unlike most items on this list, the word derp isn’t limited to cats and dogs. It can also be a stand-in for such expressions of stupidity as “duh” or “dur.” In recent years the term has become associated with clumsy, clueless, or silly-looking cats and dogs. A pet with a tongue perpetually hanging out of its mouth, like Marnie or Lil Bub, is textbook derpy.

3. BLEP

Cat laying on desk chair.
PoppetCloset, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

If you’ve ever caught a cat or dog poking the tip of its tongue past its front teeth, you’ve seen a blep in action. Unlike a derpy tongue, a blep is subtle and often gone as quickly as it appears. Animal experts aren’t entirely sure why pets blep, but in cats it may have something to do with the Flehmen response, in which they use their tongues to “smell” the air.

4. MLEM

Mlems and bleps, though very closely related, aren’t exactly the same. While blep is a passive state of being, mlem is active. It’s what happens when a pet flicks its tongue in and out of its mouth, whether to slurp up water, taste food, or just lick the air in a derpy fashion. Dogs and cats do it, of course, but reptiles have also been known to mlem.

5. FLOOF

Very fluffy cat.
J. Sibiga Photography, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Some pets barely have any fur, and others have coats so voluminous that hair appears to make up most of their bodyweight. Dogs and cats in the latter group are known as floofs. Floofy animals will famously leave a wake of fur wherever they sit and can squeeze through tight spaces despite their enormous mass. Samoyeds, Pomeranians, and Persian cats are all prime examples of floofs.

6. BORK

Dog outside barking.
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According to some corners of the internet, dogs don’t bark, they bork. Listen carefully next time you’re around a vocal doggo and you won’t be able to unhear it.

7. DOGGO

Shiba inu smiling up at the camera.
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Speaking of doggos: This word isn’t hard to decode. Every dog—regardless of size, floofiness, or derpiness—can be a doggo. If you’re willing to get creative, the word can even be applied to non-dog animals like fennec foxes (special doggos) or seals (water doggos). The usage of doggo saw a spike in 2016 thanks to the internet and by the end of 2017 it was listed as one of Merriam-Webster’s “Words We’re Watching.”

8. SMOL

Tiny kitten in grass.
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Some pets are so adorably, unbearably tiny that using proper English to describe them just doesn’t cut it. Not every small pet is smol: To earn the label, a cat or dog (or kitten or puppy) must excel in both the tiny and cute departments. A pet that’s truly smol is likely to induce excited squees from everyone around it.

9. PUPPER

Hands holding a puppy.
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Like doggo, pupper is self-explanatory: It can be used in place of the word puppy, but if you want to use it to describe a fully-grown doggo who’s particularly smol and cute, you can probably get away with it.

10. BOOF

We’ve already established that doggos go bork, but that’s not the only sound they make. A low, deep bark—perhaps from a dog that can’t decide if it wants to expend its energy on a full bark—is best described as a boof. Consider a boof a warning bark before the real thing.

11. SNOOT

Dog noses poking out beneath blanket.
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Snoot was already a dictionary-official synonym for nose by the time dog meme culture took the internet by storm. But while snoot is rarely used to describe human faces today, it’s quickly becoming the preferred term for pet snouts. There’s even a wholesome viral challenge dedicated to dogs poking their snoots through their owners' hands.

12. BOOP

Have you ever seen a dog snoot so cute you just had to reach out and tap it? And when you did, was your action accompanied by an involuntary “boop” sound? This urge is so universal that boop is now its own verb. Humans aren’t the only ones who can boop: Search the word on YouTube and treat yourself to hours of dogs, cats, and other animals exchanging the love tap.

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