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Just Born
Just Born

5 Recipes to Make With Your Extra Halloween Candy

Just Born
Just Born

There’s no such thing as too much candy on Halloween, but come November you may be looking for new ways to make a dent in your haul. These recipes call for several different types of candy, and some could even pass as party snacks once the holidays roll around. Here are five creative ways to make use of your leftovers.

1. THE ULTIMATE CANDY BARK

The beauty of candy bark is that it works as a base for nearly any type of candy you can think of. Start by melting 1.5 pounds of white chocolate together with 2 teaspoons of butter. Spread the mixture onto a baking sheet lined with greased foil and sprinkle it with whatever broken up bits of candy you have around. You can add Peeps, gummy candies, and even more chocolate. This is also a great application for any bags of peanuts or pretzels that may have gone ignored since Halloween. After the bark is left out to cool for about an hour, it’s ready to be broken up and enjoyed.

2. MINI MUG BROWNIE

Next time you’re overcome by late night chocolate cravings, use your leftover candy to whip up this decadent mug brownie. Stir together 1/4 cup of flour, 1/4 cup of brown sugar, 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder, and a pinch of salt in a mug. Next, stir in 2 tablespoons of oil and 2 tablespoons of milk, coffee, or water until you have a thick paste. Now you can add any candy bits you want, like marshmallows or Peanut Chews. Microwave on high for 1 minute and dig in. 

3. SWEET AND SPICY SNACK MIX

Shake up the traditional party mix recipe by combining spicy Hot Tamales with fruity Mike and Ikes. After adding a salty base like pretzels, feel free to toss in any chewy, chocolatey, or crunchy candies your heart may desire.

4. MONSTER TREATS

Even after Halloween has passed, there’s nothing stopping you from making something spooky with your extra candy. When making Rice Krispies treats, try molding your mixture into fun shapes and dipping them in melted milk chocolate. Transform them into “monsters” by creating one (or multiple) eyes using a white chocolate melt and and a chocolate chip pupil. 

5. POPCORN BALLS

The addition of some Halloween candy to this recipe might actually get you more excited to make popcorn balls. Pour 1/4 cup of melted butter over 8 cups of popcorn in a large bowl. Stir in one package of melted Peeps and toss in any other candies you have laying around (Hot Tamales would give them some spice, like those cinnamon popcorn balls from your days wandering the mall). Use greased, heatproof gloves to roll the mixture into balls and allow them to sit for 15 minutes at room temperature. 

Photos Courtesy Just Born.

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Hate Red M&M's? You Need a Candy Color-Sorting Machine
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You don’t have to be a demanding rock star to live a life without brown M&M's or purple Skittles—all you need is some engineering know-how and a little bit of free time.

Mechanical engineering student Willem Pennings created a machine that can take small pieces of candy—like M&M's, Skittles, Reese’s Pieces, etc.—and sort them by color into individual piles. All Pennings needs to do is pour the candy into the top funnel; from there, the machine separates the candy—around two pieces per second—and dispenses all of it into smaller bowls at the bottom designated for each variety.

The color identification is performed with an RGB sensor that takes “optical measurements” of candy pieces of equal dimensions. There are limitations, though, as Pennings revealed in a Reddit Q&A: “I wouldn't be able to use this machine for peanut M&M's, since the sizes vary so much.”

The entire building process lasted from May through December 2016, and included the actual conceptualization, 3D printing (which was outsourced), and construction. The entire project was detailed on Pennings’s website and Reddit's DIY page.

With all of the motors, circuitry, and hardware that went into it, Pennings’s machine is likely too ambitious of a task for the average candy aficionado. So until a machine like this hits the open market, you're probably stuck buying bags of single-colored M&M’s in bulk online or sorting all of the candy out yourself the old fashioned way.

To see Pennings’s machine in action, check out the video below:

[h/t Refinery 29]

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See How Candy Canes Are Made
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According to legend, a 17th-century German choirmaster bent sugar sticks into shepherd’s crooks and gave them to children acting in his Nativity pageant as a treat for good behavior. Lo and behold, the world’s first candy canes were born.

Over the years, manufacturers have perfected their own methods of making the holiday treat. In the below video from Lofty Pursuits, a Tallahassee, Florida-based purveyor of hard candies, you can watch how the expert team of candy-makers turn seemingly everyday ingredients like sugar, water, and corn syrup into a sticky mixture. Gradually, the pliable concoction is folded, stretched, rolled, cut, and bent into candy canes—a mesmerizing visual process for anyone who’s ever sucked on one of the sugary confections and suspected it came from somewhere other than Santa’s workshop.

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