These LED Bulbs Were Made to Resemble Vintage Incandescents

The incandescent light bulbs many people grew up with are officially a thing of the past. At the start of 2014, a law banning the production of the familiar 40- and 60-watt bulbs went into effect in the U.S.. And while the Edison-era incandescents definitely weren’t winning any prizes in efficiency—they emitted 90 percent of their energy in the form of heat—that warm, nostalgic aesthetic couldn’t be beat. Luckily, some lighting companies are finding ways to produce vintage-looking bulbs with LED technology.

The “Roxy” model from Lighting Science—the same company that designed lights for the International Space Station—features vertical, LED strips meant to resemble tungsten filaments that glow warmly behind a classic, clear bulb. The company’s chief technology officer Fred Maxik told Architectural Digest, “People have been putting incadescent bulbs in fixtures for years and love the way they look, and we thought it was important to respect that.” The bulb comes in the regular Soft White, and in Candle White for an even warmer feel.

Bulbrite, a leading manufacturer of specialty lights, also produces their own vintage line called Nostalgic LED Filaments. In addition to offering a range of colors, their lights come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Customers can purchase bulbs that are long and skinny, fat and round, or sleek and flame-shaped for their chandeliers. 

LED bulbs may produce stronger, more efficient light, but their space-aged bodies don’t always make for the best decoration. If you’re looking for an old school bulb to add some vintage class to your home, consider one of these earth-friendly options.

[h/t: Architectural Digest]

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Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
The Covers of Jack Kerouac's Classic Titles Are Getting a Makeover
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press

Readers have been enjoying classic Jack Kerouac books like The Dharma Bums and On the Road for decades, but starting this August the novels will have a new look. Several abstract covers have been unveiled as part of Penguin’s "Great Kerouac" series, according to design website It’s Nice That.

The vibrant covers, designed by Tom Etherington of Penguin Press, feature the works of abstract expressionist painter Franz Kline. The artwork is intended to capture “the experience of reading Kerouac” rather than illustrating a particular scene or character, Etherington told It’s Nice That. Indeed, abstract styles of artwork seem a fitting match for Kerouac’s “spontaneous prose”—a writing style that was influenced by improvisational jazz music.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of The Dharma Bums, which was published just one year after On the Road. The Great Kerouac series will be available for purchase on August 2.

[h/t It's Nice That]

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Apple
Here's a Preview of the 70 New Emojis Coming to Your iPhone
Apple
Apple

Get ready to add a whole new set of symbols to your emoji vocabulary. As CNN reports, Apple has released a sneak peak of some of the 70 new emojis coming to iOS in late 2018.

In February 2018, the Unicode Consortium announced the latest additions to their official emoji database. Software makers have since been working on customizing the designs for their own operating systems, and now iPhone and iPad users are getting a preview of what the new emojis will look like on their devices.

One of the most highly anticipated new symbols is the redhead emoji, something people have been demanding for a while. A curly haired option, another popular request, will be added to the line-up, as will gray-hair and bald emoji choices. Each of the new hair types can be added to the classic face emoji regardless of gender, but when it comes to specific characters like the bride or the jogger emojis, users will be limited to the same hair options they had before.

If Apple users ever want to express their inner superhero, two new super characters, a man and woman, will let them do so. They will also have new "smiley" symbols to choose from, like a party emoji, a sad eyes emoji, and a frozen emoji.

In the food category you have a head of lettuce and a mango, and for dessert, a cupcake and a mooncake—a festive Chinese pastry. New animals include a peacock, a kangaroo, and a lobster. The lobster emoji stirred some controversy in February when Mainers noticed the Unicode version was missing a set of legs. The design was quickly revised, and Apple's version is also anatomically correct.

These images just show a small sample of the emojis that will be included in an iOS update planned for later in 2018. Users will have to wait to see the final designs for other the symbols on the list.

New Apple emojis.
Apple

New Apple emojis.
Apple

New Apple emojis.
Apple

New Apple emojis.
Apple

[h/t CNN]

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