Get Blissed Out With The Very First Episode of The Joy of Painting

For years, the internet has been basking in the happy little trees and clouds and streams and meadows of the Bob Ross universe. Many full episodes of the painter’s PBS series The Joy of Painting are on YouTube, but all this time, fans probably didn't know they were missing out on something else: the pilot episode.

Good news, Ross-heads. “A Walk in the Woods,” season 1, episode 1, appeared online in 2015 through the Bob Ross YouTube channel. The description reads: “Bob Ross introduces us to his ‘Almighty’ assortment of tools and colors, tells us that anyone can paint, and creates a landscape of a forest path just after a rain shower.”

In it, our favorite afro-ed television personality paints a golden woods scene (yes, complete with “happy little leaves”) and shows that, from the very beginning, he had that signature way with words.

“We start with a vision in our heart, and we put it on canvas,” he says.

[h/t Digg]

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toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
Meet Japan's Original (Not-so-Fresh) Form of Sushi, 'Funazushi'
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)

When it comes to sushi, fresh is usually best. Most of the sushi we eat in America is haya-nare, which involves raw seafood and vinegared rice. But in Japan, there's an older form of sushi—said to be the original form—called funazushi. It's made from fermented carp sourced from one particular place, Lake Biwa, and takes about three years to produce from start to finish. The salt it's cured with keeps the bad bacteria at bay, and the result is said to taste like a fish version of prosciutto. Great Big Story recently caught up with Mariko Kitamura, the 18th generation to run her family’s shop in Takashima City, where she's one of the very few people left producing funazushi. You can learn more about the process behind the delicacy, and about Kitamura, in the video below.

Watch Koko the Gorilla Meet Her New Pet Kittens

Koko the gorilla passed away at the age of 46 this week. Though she was best known for her use of sign language, her love of cats is what made her a media darling.

In 1983, the western lowland gorilla reportedly told trainer Penny Patterson that she wanted a cat. Patterson and her fellow researchers at The Gorilla Foundation supported this idea, hoping that caring for a cat might prepare Koko for motherhood.

They gave Koko a lifelike stuffed animal and after she ignored that gift, she was given a gray kitten for her birthday in July 1984. Koko rejoiced. She named the cat All Ball and carried him around like a baby. All Ball got out of Koko's cage and was hit by a car just a few months later. Trainer Penny Patterson shared the news with Koko, who, Patterson said, began crying. “Sleep cat,” she reportedly signed.

For Koko's 44th birthday in 2015, Patterson let her pick out two new pets from a litter of kittens. The result was as cute as you might expect.

For more Koko videos, follow kokoflix on Youtube.

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