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Barcelona's Sagrada Família Begins Final Stage of Construction

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getty images

In 1882, construction of the Sagrada Família began, with the renowned Antoni Gaudí stepping in as head architect the following year. Many obstacles plagued the creation of the basilica: Gaudí passed away in 1926, and revolutionaries set the crypt ablaze during the Spanish Civil War. Now, 133 years later, the beautiful church remains unfinished.

The structure, currently 70 percent complete, is finally entering its last stage of construction. Chief architect Jordi Fauli presented the project on October 21, saying the majority of the building would be finished in 2026 to coincide with the 100-year anniversary of Gaudí's death. Smaller details and decorations will take more time and will likely be finalized by 2030 or 2032.

Six new towers will be added to the church, giving the final structure eighteen towers, all dedicated to religious figures like Virgin Mary and the four evangelists (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John).

The Tower of Jesus Christ, the tallest spire, will be over 564 feet tall and adorned with a large cross at the top. It will be situated on a chamber that was just recently completed; the chamber, which is 196 feet above the church floor, allows visitors a better look at the stained glass ceilings. The tower will filter more light into the church, making the sight even more dazzling.

"The central tower of 172.5 meters (566 feet) will make it the tallest cathedral in Europe, because the tallest tower in Europe is Ulm, at 162 meters (531.5 feet)," Fauli said.

With an annual construction budget of €25 million (almost $28 million), construction is slow but steady. The following video, released by The Sagrada Familia Foundation, shows what stages are left to complete and what the project will look like when it's finished. 

[h/t: Dezeen]

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Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images
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This Just In
For $61, You Can Become a Co-Owner of This 13th-Century French Castle
Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images
Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images

A cultural heritage restoration site recently invited people to buy a French castle for as little as $61. The only catch? You'll be co-owning it with thousands of other donors. Now thousands of shareholders are responsible for the fate of the Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers in western France, and there's still room for more people to participate.

According to Mashable, the dilapidated structure has a rich history. Since its construction in the 13th century, the castle has been invaded by foreign forces, looted, renovated, and devastated by a fire. Friends of Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers, a small foundation formed in 2016 in an effort to conserve the overgrown property, want to see the castle restored to its former glory.

Thanks to a crowdfunding collaboration with the cultural heritage restoration platform Dartagnans, the group is closer than ever to realizing its mission. More than 9000 web users have contributed €51 ($61) or more to the campaign to “adopt” Mothe-Chandeniers. Now that the original €500,000 goal has been fulfilled, the property’s new owners are responsible for deciding what to do with their purchase.

“We intend to create a dedicated platform that will allow each owner to monitor the progress of works, events, project proposals and build a real collaborative and participatory project,” the campaign page reads. “To make an abandoned ruin a collective work is the best way to protect it over time.”

Even though the initial goal has been met, Dartagnans will continue accepting funds for the project through December 25. Money collected between now and then will be used to pay for various fees related to the purchase of the site, and new donors will be added to the growing list of owners.

The shareholders will be among the first to see the cleared-out site during an initial visit next spring. The rest of the public will have to wait until it’s fully restored to see the final product.

[h/t Mashable]

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Plantagon
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environment
How This Underground Urban Farm in Stockholm Will Heat the Building Above It
Plantagon
Plantagon

In just a few months, an emerging startup in Stockholm will attempt to change how urban farmers think about sustainability—and how building owners can benefit from being eco-friendly. A Swedish company called Plantagon is expected to open a basement farm under a 26-floor office tower in the city without paying a cent in rent.

How? If all goes according to plan, the heat from the LED lights helping to nourish the plants will be vented to the rest of the building, covering heating costs that are nearly three times the amount the building’s owners would charge to lease the space.

The recycled energy is part of Plantagon’s plan to alter the landscape of urban farming. According to Fast Company’s Adele Peters, the company—which is soliciting a round of capital on the Swedish crowdfunding site FundedByMe—is looking to provide a model for farmers to host and distribute their greens while minimizing overhead. Some of the produce will be sold directly to office workers above the farm, including two restaurants; Plantagon also plans to open a store in the building as well as sell goods to nearby dealers that won’t require fossil fuels to transport.


Plantagon intends to open 10 more farms in Stockholm and one “plantscraper” (the concept art for which is shown above) that will provide food on multiple floors while subsidizing costs with tenants on others floors. Eventually, Plantagon might even be able to sell its additional heat from the farms into citywide channels to further support the cost of doing business. 

[h/t Fast Company]

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