7 Movies That Could Have Starred Daniel Day-Lewis

Jason Merritt/Getty Images
Jason Merritt/Getty Images

Ah, Daniel Day-Lewis. God of Method acting, three-time Best Actor Oscar winner, and a famously selective actor who somehow still ended up in a movie with Fergie. The man has had a lot of cinematic flybys in his life—some for the better, some for the worse. Now, in a surprising announcement, the 60-year-old thespian has announced that his next film—Paul Thomas Anderson's Phantom Thread, which is set to hit theaters on Christmas Day—will also be his final film.

No formal reason was given for his decision, nor should we expect one. In a statement, Day-Lewis's spokesperson, Leslee Dart, simply confirmed that "Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject."

As we await the release of Day-Lewis's final film, let's take a look back at some of his cinematic could've-beens.

1. THE LORD OF THE RINGS (2001)

Daniel Day-Lewis’ most famous could’ve-been is the role of Aragorn in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he turned down multiple times. The actor’s not too keen on big-budget studio franchises in general, saying in a 2009 interview that “I wouldn’t really want to be involved in making films I wouldn’t want to go and see … When I’m working on something I’m intrigued by, I’m never bored. I’m incapable of being bored. And if I found myself working on a film and during the course of that work I was bored, because I didn’t really know what the hell I was involved in, I would find that infinitely demoralizing and it might well make me decide to pack my bags.” Jackson would eventually settle on Viggo Mortensen for the role, though he’d have to go through several other actors first.

2. INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (1994)

The Lord of the Rings wasn’t the first genre offering that Day-Lewis passed on. Back in the 1990s, he was offered the role of Lestat in Interview with the Vampire. At the time, however, he was filming In the Name of the Father and refused to read any scripts. According to a 1994 Premiere profile, Interview with the Vampire producer David Geffen called the actor’s agent “on an almost daily basis” over a period of months before Day-Lewis eventually declined. Tom Cruise filled out the fangs.

3. PHILADELPHIA (1993)

The lead role in Philadelphia is another one Day-Lewis said no to, to the apparent irritation of writer Ron Nyswaner. “Tom Hanks really wanted to play Andrew Beckett,” Nyswaner later recalled. “[Director] Jonathan [Demme] and I, and the producers, had been thinking of more, perhaps, conventional casting. Honestly, it was Daniel Day-Lewis. And Daniel Day-Lewis passed. We were so pissed off … [laughing] How dare he! This is going to be such an important picture! Tom Hanks and Jonathan Demme had lunch, and Tom Hanks said, ‘I think I can do this.’” Hanks would go on to win the Best Actor Oscar for the role, beating out Day-Lewis, who was nominated for In the Name of the Father.

4. PULP FICTION (1994)

This time, it was Day-Lewis who got turned down. Well, sort of. Pulp Fiction co-executive producer Harvey Weinstein hated Quentin Tarantino’s idea of casting John Travolta as Vincent Vega, as the Saturday Night Fever star hadn’t exactly been lighting the box office on fire at the time. As a result, Weinstein reached out to other actors, one of whom was Day-Lewis. He “and Bruce Willis, who was the biggest star in Hollywood, had both gotten their hands on the script and wanted to play Vincent Vega,” Tarantino’s agent, Mike Simpson, recalled to Vanity Fair. With the deadline to secure Travolta looming, Weinstein caved into Tarantino’s wishes. When Weinstein saw the finished film, according to Miramax’s then-head of production Richard Gladstein, he jokingly commented that, “I’m so glad I had the idea to cast John Travolta.”

5. SID AND NANCY (1986)

Early in his career, just around the time he was breaking out with My Beautiful Laundrette and A Room with a View, Day-Lewis expressed interest in playing Sid Vicious in Sid and Nancy, the role that would instead be Gary Oldman’s breakout. “I think [Day-Lewis] would have been very good, too,” said director Alex Cox. “He gives one the impression of possessing a soul, and would probably have handled the romantic aspect well. But Gary was an authentic Bermonsey boy … he really understood the ambitious aspect, the desperate need to get out of South London at all costs.”

6. TERMINATOR SALVATION (2009)

File this one under “not in a million years.” Terminator Salvation director McG wanted Day-Lewis for the cyborg role that would eventually go to Sam Worthington. “I’m looking for credible actors,” the director said while the movie was still in the casting process. “We’ve already got Christian Bale, who is one of the greatest actors of his generation [to play John Connor]. I’d love to get Daniel Day-Lewis, but I don't know if he goes in for this kind of movie.” Not so much.

7. BATMAN FOREVER (1995)

Equally unlikely, if not more so: According to actor Billy Baldwin, he and Day-Lewis were both on the shortlist of actors director Joel Schumacher was considering to play the Caped Crusader in Batman Forever. “Tim Burton and Michael Keaton had left, so Joel had the luxury of replacing Michael Keaton and he told me that his four choices—which was an eclectic, diverse array—were Daniel Day-Lewis, Ralph Fiennes, Val Kilmer, and me.” It was apparently studio Warner Bros.’ choice to go with Kilmer; one doubts Day-Lewis would have answered their calls.

New Game of Thrones Season 8 Teaser Features an Important Callback to the Very First Episode

HBO
HBO

On Sunday, January 13, HBO finally shared the air date for Game of Thrones's eighth and final season, along with a 90-second promo that featured Jon Snow and Sansa and Arya Stark walking through the Crypts of Winterfell with the voices of the late Lyanna, Catelyn, and Ned Stark heard as they passed each of their statues.

In the immediate aftermath of the new teaser, the biggest question on people's minds seemed to be the whereabouts of Bran Stark—and whether his absence from the trailer confirmed one of the long-held fan theories that Bran is in fact the Night King, or that he is the Three-Eyed Raven. But now that fans have had additional time to digest the footage, they've noticed something else: a clever callback to the series' first-ever episode from 2011.

Just after the 1:00 mark, the camera closes in on feather which quickly freezes over with ice. To the casual viewer, this may not seem like an important thing. But those who recall the show's tiniest details recognized the feather as a callback to the pilot episode of Game of Thrones, and a symbol of Jon Snow's true parentage.

As Business Insider reminds us in "Winter is Coming"—the first aired episode of Game of Thrones—Lyanna's statue was shown in very much the same way that we see it in the new teaser, with King Robert Baratheon placing a feather on it. Fast forward to the fifth season, and you may remember Sansa visiting Lyanna's crypt and picking up that same feather. Both of these scenes hinted that Lyanna was Jon's real mother—a fact that was confirmed in season seven, when it was revealed that he is indeed the son of Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen, who were secretly married in Dorne. (Though Jon doesn't know it yet.)

Ever since that revelation, we've suspected that Jon—who is believed to be the bastard son of Ned Stark—will finally learn about his parents in the final season, and the teaser seems to confirm that it will be an important storyline. Especially considering the growing romance between Jon and Daenerys Targaryen, who is Rhaegar's sister … making her Jon's aunt (unbeknownst to either of them, of course).

The final season of Game of Thrones will premiere on April 14, 2019.

Why Chris Evans Turned Down the Role of Captain America 'A Few Times'

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

In 2011, Chris Evans made his first big-screen appearance as superhero Steve Rogers/Captain America in Captain America: The First Avenger. It may now seem impossible for Marvel fans to imagine any other actor in the role, but Evans once admitted that it took a lot of convincing to get him to sign on for the part.

While appearing on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in 2016, Evans revealed that he actually turned down the project "a few times" before finally saying yes. When asked by Kimmel why he was so reluctant to play such a popular superhero, Evans replied that, "I was scared."

In addition to admitting to "having some social anxiety with this industry," Evans explained that his main hesitation was in signing what was ostensibly a nine-picture contract. "In doing movies one at a time, if all of a sudden you decide you don't want to do it anymore, you're afforded the opportunity to take a step back and recalibrate," Evans said. "When you have a giant contract, if all of a sudden you're not responding well? Too bad, you've got to suit up again. That was scary."

Though he initially declined the role, Evans said the offer just kept coming back to him. And after talking to family and friends about it, he realized what an amazing opportunity he was being offered—and what was holding him back.

"I was saying no out of fear, really," Evans said. "You can't do anything out of fear. You can't be doing something because you're scared. It ended up kind of clicking to me in the way that whatever you're scared of, push yourself into it."

Evans's Captain America has gone on to become one of the Marvel Cinematic Universe's most popular characters, though it's largely rumored that Avengers: Endgame will mark his final outing as The Captain. Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, and Keke Palmer are just a few of the actors whose names are swirling as possible replacements for Evans.

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