CLOSE
Original image
Philip Lange, courtesy of The Lowline

Take a Peek at the World's First Underground Park

Original image
Philip Lange, courtesy of The Lowline

New York tourists and locals alike love the High Line, an outdoor public park that’s constructed across an old freight rail line on Manhattan’s West Side. Now, builders of the Lowline—the world’s first proposed underground park—have given visitors a peek at what the subterranean gardens might look like if they ever open to the public.

Like the High Line, the Lowline would transform an unused section of New York’s extensive transit system—in this case, a 48-year-old abandoned underground trolley terminal on the Lower East Side—into a public green space with vegetation and flowers. Solar-harnessing technology would provide the plants with much-needed sunlight, allowing them to flourish deep below ground.

The Lowline hasn't been built yet, and it probably won’t open for quite some time—if ever—due to legal red tape and funding issues, Gothamist reports. And despite several successful Kickstarter campaigns under its belt, the project still needs about $70 million to become a reality. However, involved parties recently opened up a preview space dubbed the "Lowline Lab" in a warehouse on Essex Street. Located just two blocks from the suggested Lowline site, the 1000-square-foot room serves as a simulation of how the park will look and operate. Someday, planners say, the Lowline could stretch for 50,000 square feet underground and include plants like live trees, pineapples, ferns, moss, and mushrooms.

Until the Lowline becomes real—a time the organization has optimistically slated for 2020—you can visit the Lab for free on weekends through spring 2016. Nowhere near New York? Take a peek at what the attraction might look like in the pictures below.

All photos by Philip Lange, courtesy of The Lowline

[h/t Gothamist]

Original image
Emmanuel Dunand/Getty Images
arrow
entertainment
Grand Central Terminal is Hosting a Film Festival of its Own Cameos
Original image
Emmanuel Dunand/Getty Images

Even if you’ve never set foot in New York City, chances are you’re intimately familiar with Grand Central Terminal. A sprawling, architecturally awesome railway station located on East 42nd Street in Manhattan, it’s been a favorite of Hollywood location scouts since its first onscreen appearance in the 1930 musical Puttin’ on the Ritz.

According to Times Square Chronicles, the terminal is now set to host an event worthy of its rich cinematic history: a film festival. On Thursday, October 19, screenings in the terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall will include clips from some of its most notable movie appearances. The show will culminate in a feature-length presentation of Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 classic North by Northwest, notable for a scene in which star Cary Grant eludes his pursuers by making his way through Grand Central.

The Museum of the Moving Image and Rooftop Films are collaborating on the special event, titled Grand Central Cinema. North by Northwest begins at 7:30 p.m., but that ticketed admission is already sold out and the waiting list is at capacity. Fortunately, the montage of clips will play all day from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Historians will also be giving presentations of the site's history on screen throughout the program. Admission is free.

[h/t Times Square Chronicles]

Original image
MODS International, Amazon
arrow
architecture
You Can Now Shop for Tiny Houses on Amazon
Original image
MODS International, Amazon

Whether you’re in the market for board games, boxed wine, or pickup trucks, you can likely find what you’re looking for on Amazon. Now, the web retailer’s catalogue of 400,000,000 items includes actual homes. As Curbed reports, Amazon will deliver a tiny house made from a shipping container to your current place of residence.

The pint-sized dwelling is made by the modular home builder MODS International, and is selling for $36,000 (plus $3754 for shipping, even for Prime members). The container is prefabricated and move-in ready, with a bedroom, shower, toilet, sink, kitchenette, and living area built into the 320-square-foot space. The tiny house also includes heating and air conditioning, making it a good fit for any climate. And though the abode does have places to hook up sewage, water, and electrical work, you'll have to do a little work before switching on a light or flushing the toilet.

Becoming a homeowner without the six-digit price tag may sound like a deal, but the MODS International home costs slightly more than the average tiny house. It’s not hard for minimalists to find a place for about $25,000, and people willing to build a home themselves can do so without spending more than $10,000. But it's hard to put a price on the convenience of browsing and buying homes online in your pajamas.

[h/t Curbed]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios