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In Norway, 'Texas' Is Slang for 'Crazy'

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The Norwegian word gal translates as "crazy." However, citizens of the Nordic nation have apparently adopted a more unconventional slang term to describe something that’s unpredictable, chaotic, exhilarating, or simply scary—“texas.”

According to Texas Monthly, Norwegians have used the state-inspired expression for several decades now. It's meant to conjure the place's rough-and-tumble history—cowboys, lassos, outlaws—and all the wild associations that go along with it.

Apparently the term isn't capitalized, and it's employed as an adjective to conjure an atmosphere—meaning you wouldn’t be calling someone “texas,” but rather something or some situation. Instead of saying “That party was totally crazy,” you’d say “det var helt texas,” or “it was completely texas.”

To prove that “texas” is actually widespread terminology in Norway, Texas Monthly dredged up several news articles in which the state name is used to describe everything from truck drivers on dangerous routes to a wild soccer game to a rare swordfish caught in a fjord. And though that fish bit would most likely only happen in Norway, it’s interesting to see a word that’s so American be used to describe such a culturally foreign act.

We sense a new reality show coming—Texans going texas in Norway.

[h/t Texas Monthly]

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How to Say Merry Christmas in 26 Different Languages
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“Merry Christmas” is a special greeting in English, since it’s the only occasion we say “merry” instead of “happy.” How do other languages spread yuletide cheer? Ampersand Travel asked people all over the world to send in videos of themselves wishing people a “Merry Christmas” in their own language, and while the audio quality is not first-rate, it’s a fun holiday-themed language lesson.

Feel free to surprise your friends and family this year with your new repertoire of foreign-language greetings.

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How Often Is 'Once in a Blue Moon'? Let Neil deGrasse Tyson Explain
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From “lit” to “I can’t even,” lots of colloquialisms make no sense. But not all confusing phrases stem from Millennial mouths. Take, for example, “once in a blue moon”—an expression you’ve likely heard uttered by teachers, parents, newscasters, and even scientists. This term is often used to describe a rare phenomenon—but why?

Even StarTalk Radio host Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn’t know for sure. “I have no idea why a blue moon is called a blue moon,” he tells Mashable. “There is nothing blue about it at all.”

A blue moon is the second full moon to appear in a single calendar month. Astronomy dictates that two full moons can technically occur in one month, so long as the first moon rises early in the month and the second appears around the 30th or 31st. This type of phenomenon occurs every couple years or so. So taken literally, “Once in a blue moon” must mean "every few years"—even if the term itself is often used to describe something that’s even more rare.

[h/t Mashable]

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