CLOSE

See a List of All the Actors Who Could Have Played Doc Brown


Image from Back the Future: The Ultimate Visual History by Michael Klastorin with Randal Atamaniuk published by HarperCollins Publishers, copyright 2015.

There’s no shortage of amazing Hollywood lore around "sliding doors" moments in which iconic roles were almost played by someone else, and a recently published casting list from Back to the Future just gave the world a whole new set to obsess over.

In Back to the Future: The Ultimate Visual History by Michael Klastorin and Randal Atamaniuk (out today), there’s a casting list from the Fenton-Feinberg Casting agency for the role of the “Scientist” a.k.a. Doctor Emmett Brown. It’s dated August 21, 1984, and includes 40-plus possibilities including Jeff Goldblum, John Cleese, John Candy, Danny DeVito, Michael Keaton, Gene Hackman, Steve Martin, Chevy Chase, Eddie Murphy, Randy Quaid, Joe Piscopo, Bill Cosby, Mickey Rourke, Gene Wilder, and, of course, the man who would become Doc Brown, Christopher (“Chris”) Lloyd.

The list functioned as a wide net range of possibilities, and not every actor was seen for the role. In the end, Jeff Goldblum and John Lithgow seem to be the ones who got closest to clinching the role of the eccentric scientist, but it’s hard to imagine anyone other than Lloyd as the beloved Brown.

In the upper right hand corner of the list, there are also handwritten names of would-be Marty McFlys like Eric Stoltz, C. Thomas Howell, Ralph Macchio and “[John] Kusak” (sic). Stoltz famously landed the role before being replaced by Michael J. Fox mid-shoot.

[h/t Christopher Campbell]

arrow
video
26 Facts About LEGO Bricks

Since it first added plastic, interlocking bricks to its lineup, the Danish toy company LEGO (from the words Leg Godt for “play well”) has inspired builders of all ages to bring their most imaginative designs to life. Sets have ranged in size from scenes that can be assembled in a few minutes to 5000-piece behemoths depicting famous landmarks. And tinkerers aren’t limited to the sets they find in stores. One of the largest LEGO creations was a life-sized home in the UK that required 3.2 million tiny bricks to construct.

In this episode of the List Show, John Green lays out 26 playful facts about one of the world’s most beloved toy brands. To hear about the LEGO black market, the vault containing every LEGO set ever released, and more, check out the video above then subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with the latest flossy content.

Original image
iStock
arrow
video
Of Buckeyes and Butternuts: 29 States With Weird Nicknames for Their Residents
Original image
iStock

Tracing a word’s origin and evolution can yield fascinating historical insights—and the weird nicknames used in some states to describe their residents are no exception. In the Mental Floss video above, host John Green explains the probable etymologies of 29 monikers that describe inhabitants of certain states across the country.

Some of these nicknames, like “Hoosiers” and “Arkies” (which denote residents of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively) may have slightly offensive connotations, while others—including "Buckeyes," "Jayhawks," "Butternuts," and "Tar Heels"—evoke the military histories of Ohio, Kansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. And a few, like “Muskrats” and “Sourdoughs,” are even inspired by early foods eaten in Delaware and Alaska. ("Goober-grabber" sounds goofier, but it at least refers to peanuts, which are a common crop in Georgia, as well as North Carolina and Arkansas.)

Learn more fascinating facts about states' nicknames for their residents by watching the video above.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios