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The Time Wes Craven Called Out a High School in the Scream Credits

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Next time you’re re-watching Scream, be sure to keep watching until the very end. Though most film credits thank people and organizations that assisted in the making of the movie, Wes Craven went out of his way to do just the opposite: "No thanks whatsoever to the Santa Rosa City School District Governing Board."

In early 1996, the Scream production crew decided Santa Rosa High School would be the perfect setting for their new horror film. The Sonoma County, California institution was no stranger to cameras invading their hallways: Movies like Peggy Sue Got Married and Inventing the Abbotts were also shot there, while the city itself has served as the backdrop for everything from Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt to Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot.

The Scream crew said they received a verbal agreement from the school's principal that they could film at the school, and developed a shooting schedule around the dates provided. But the plan started to unravel shortly before filming was scheduled to begin. First, city representatives claimed that the crew hadn’t filed the proper paperwork. Even after the red tape had been dealt with, the school ultimately nixed production, saying it conflicted with final exams. Citizen complaints might also have played a part; it seems that area residents weren’t thrilled about a gory slasher film being shot in the hallowed halls of Santa Rosa High.

After scrambling to find a suitable substitute, the movie was relocated to the Sonoma Community Center, a former elementary school. Entire scenes had to be rewritten to accommodate the last-minute change, costing the production time and money. An unhappy Wes Craven allegedly did more than just call out the city in the film's final credits; rumor had it that he actually called for a Hollywood boycott of Santa Rosa and Sonoma County.

Craven never confirmed it publicly, but others in Hollywood talked about it, including producer Daniel Farrands, who also happened to graduate from Santa Rosa High School. “Santa Rosa is very high on the Hollywood black list of places not to take your productions,” Farrands told horror.com in 2011.

But according to Catherine De Prima, Sonoma County’s former film commissioner, there was never a problem. “There is always fluctuation in this business,” she said several years after the Scream debacle. She may be right, but if you look at the county’s movie sites map, you’ll notice that there aren’t too many recent films on the list. Blacklist or just regular industry ups and downs? It’s hard to say. Either way, crossing a horror movie master seems like a bad idea.

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Live Smarter
Here's What to Do With Leftover Halloween Candy
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Americans indulged their sweet tooth in a major way this Halloween, spending an estimated $2.7 billion on candy intended for front porch distribution. Rather than confronting a weepy child with an empty bowl because they bought too little, shoppers tend to buy in bulk. Come November, that can mean pounds of sugar-packed temptation still sitting in the house.

The good news: You can remove the risk to your waistline and do some good at the same time. A number of charitable organizations take leftover candy and send it to troops stationed overseas. Operation Gratitude has set up a number of drop-off centers around the country—you can search by zip code—to accept your extra treats. Once collected, they’ll send them to both troops and first responders. Last year, the group collected nearly 534,000 pounds of goodies.

Often, drop-off locations will be located in dental offices as a way of reminding everyone of the perils of tooth decay from excess sugar consumption. Some dentists even offer buy-back programs, paying $1 for each pound returned.

If donating to a national program is proving difficult, you can always deliver the extra candy to local food pantries or homeless shelters.

[h/t weartv.com]  

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Health
The FDA Has a Warning for People Who Love Black Licorice
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Every Halloween, children and adults alike gorge on candy. One estimate puts the number of junk calories consumed at up to 7000 per kid, the equivalent of 13 Big Macs. While all of that sugar is most certainly not healthy, Consumerist reports that there’s actually a more immediate danger to your well-being: black licorice.

Most versions of the candy, which gains some popularity around the spooky season, contains glycyrrhizin, a sweetening compound found in the licorice root. While tasty, glycyrrhizin can affect potassium levels in the body, causing them to fall to dangerously low levels. High blood pressure, swelling, and even heart issues can develop as a result.

It’s not just bingeing that can cause issues. According to the Food and Drug Administration, adults over 40 who eat more than two ounces of black licorice a day for two weeks could suffer heart problems like arrhythmia. If you have a history of heart disease, you’re even more susceptible to complications.

The FDA recommends using a little common sense when consuming black licorice, eating it in moderate amounts and stopping if you notice any adverse symptoms. If you do experience potassium level drops, it’s usually reversible once you put the bag down. Treats that are licorice-flavored are typically artificial and won’t have the same effect as the actual plant root—but for your waistline’s sake, try to avoid gorging on anything.

[h/t Consumerist]

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