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Classic Tetris World Championship / Chris Higgins
Classic Tetris World Championship / Chris Higgins

Stream The Classic Tetris World Championship Today!

Classic Tetris World Championship / Chris Higgins
Classic Tetris World Championship / Chris Higgins

Today, the sixth annual Classic Tetris World Championship takes place in Portland, Oregon. At the event, the world's best Tetris players duke it out using original Nintendo hardware, thrift-store CRT TVs, and live commentary by experts. If you dig Tetris, this is the event of the year.

If you can't make it in person, it's streaming on Hitbox, and embedded below (minus the live chat). The 32-player bracket begins Sunday, October 18, at 10am Pacific Standard Time (UTC-8). Here's the full schedule:

NES Tournament Early Rounds (Announcer: Chris Bidwell)

Round 1: 10:30am - 12:00pm (16 matches)

Round 2: 12:15pm - 1:15pm (8 matches)

Break: 1:15pm - 1:45pm

NES Tournament Top 8 (Announcer: Chris Tang)

Round 3: 2:00pm - 2:45pm (4 matches)

Round 4: 3:00pm - 3:30pm (2 matches)

Round 5: 3:45pm - 4:30pm (final match)

NES Award Presentation: 4:30pm

Note: If you are in Portland, come by the event and say hi! I'm the head referee for the championship this year.

Wait, What's the Classic Tetris World Championship?

If you're not aware of this game, it may be useful to watch Ecstasy of Order: The Tetris Masters, a documentary about the first competition of this kind. Here's the trailer:

Five years later, the event has gotten much bigger. More video, including previous years' streams of the final rounds, is available on the CTWC site.

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WWF
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Animals
Watch an Antarctic Minke Whale Feed in a First-of-Its-Kind Video
WWF
WWF

New research from the World Wildlife Fund is giving us a rare glimpse into the world of the mysterious minke whale. The WWF worked with Australian Antarctic researchers to tag minke whales with cameras for the first time, watching where and how the animals feed.

The camera attaches to the whale's body with suction cups. In the case of the video below, the camera accidentally slid down the side of the minke whale's body, providing an unexpected look at the way its throat moves as it feeds.

Minke whales are one of the smallest baleen whales, but they're still pretty substantial animals, growing 30 to 35 feet long and weighing up to 20,000 pounds. Unlike other baleen whales, though, they're small enough to maneuver in tight spaces like within sea ice, a helpful adaptation for living in Antarctic waters. They feed by lunging through the sea, gulping huge amounts of water along with krill and small fish, and then filtering the mix through their baleen.

The WWF video shows just how quickly the minke can process this treat-laden water. The whale could lunge, process, and lunge again every 10 seconds. "He was like a Pac-Man continuously feeding," Ari Friedlaender, the lead scientist on the project, described in a press statement.

The video research, conducted under the International Whaling Commission's Southern Ocean Research Partnership, is part of WWF's efforts to protect critical feeding areas for whales in the region.

If that's not enough whale for you, you can also watch the full 13-minute research video below:

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Darel Carey
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video
Mind-Bending Tape Art
Darel Carey
Darel Carey
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These surreal installations are made entirely of tape. They're the creation of artist Darel Carey, who has made it his mission to "dimensionalize" flat surfaces into 3D topographies. See more of his trippy tape art on Instagram

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