15 Things to Do With Pumpkins (Besides Carve Them)

Suffering from jack-o-lantern fatigue? Try one of these alternative projects instead. 

1. MAKE A DIORAMA.

With some dollhouse materials and LED lights, you can make almost any scene you can think of. (Bonus: As far as backgrounds go, it's way cooler than a shoebox.)

Tutorial

2. COVER THEM IN FOLIAGE. 

Sometimes all you need are the right stickers. (In this case, leaf shapes help lend a little extra fall flair.) Add a little Mod Podge to the mix to make sure your stickers stick, rain or shine. 

Tutorial

3. WRAP THEM UP. 

A little gauze + some googly eyes = the cutest mummy ever. 

Tutorial.

4. TRY SOMETHING SWEET. 

Take advantage of a gourd's natural donut shape by turning it into a sprinkled sweet. All you need is some acrylic paint and a steady hand. 

Tutorial

5. MAKE A GAME.

Use chalkboard paint and letter stickers to turn your pumpkin into a seasonal word search. Or, leave your new canvas blank and let visitors doodle away.

Tutorial

6. MELT SOME CRAYONS.

To create this technicolor delight, start with a white pumpkin. Glue a rainbow of unwrapped crayons on top (Crayola work best), then melt with a hair dryer.

Tutorial

7. MAKE IT CREEPY. 

We get it: You're tired of carving. Luckily, this option requires just a few cuts, plus some comically-oversized plastic eyeballs. 

Tutorial

8. ADD SOME COBWEBS.

Mike Krautter

Apply painter's tape, spray with paint, then peel off your spooky stencil. 

Tutorial

9. USE NAPKINS.

Give leftover paper goods new life by gluing napkins with bright designs to the surface of your gourd.

Tutorial.

10. MAKE THEM GLOW.

With the help of some glow-in-the-dark paint, you can mimic the look of a carved pumpkin and candle.

Tutorial

11. BREAK OUT THE SHARPIES. 

Think of white pumpkins as canvases for your art. Consider investing in a book on Zentangles to help you settle on the best patterns and doodles for your pumpkin.  

Tutorial.

12. START A PARTY.  

Find pumpkins with longer stems and transform them into beaks, trunks, and snouts. Soon you’ll have a ton of animals ready to party. 

Tutorial

13. ADD SOME RUSTIC FLAIR.

Buy some fake pumpkins, but lose the lame plastic stems. Doorknobs look way more magical. 

Tutorial.

14. COVER IT IN EYEBALLS.  

Is there anything creepier than a pumpkin with eyes that follow you around the room? Thanks to screw-on cat eyes, you can make all of your guests squirm in their seats. 

Tutorial. 

15. ADD OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Have a pretty white pumpkin ready to go? The right gold or multi-colored push pins mean you can be done decorating in as little as five minutes. 

Tutorial

5 Fast Facts About the Spring Equinox

iStock.com/AHPhotoswpg
iStock.com/AHPhotoswpg

The northern hemisphere has officially survived a long winter of Arctic temperatures, bomb cyclones, and ice tsunamis. Spring starts March 20, which means warmer weather and longer days are around the corner. To celebrate the spring equinox, hear are some facts about the event.

1. The spring equinox arrives at 5:58 p.m.

The first day of spring is today, but the spring equinox will only be here for a brief time. At 5:58 p.m. Eastern Time, the Sun will be perfectly in line with the equator, which results in both the northern and southern hemispheres receiving equal amounts of sunlight throughout the day. After the vernal equinox has passed, days will start to become shorter for the Southern Hemisphere and longer up north.

2. The Equinox isn't the only time you can balance an egg.

You may have heard the myth that you can balance on egg on its end during the vernal equinox, and you may have even tried the experiment in school. The idea is that the extra gravitational pull from the Sun when it's over the equator helps the egg stand up straight. While it is possible to balance an egg, the trick has nothing to do with the equinox: You can make an egg stand on its end by setting it on a rough surface any day of the year.

3. Not every place gets equal night and day.

The equal night and day split between the northern and southern hemispheres isn't distributed evenly across all parts of the world. Though every region gets approximately 12 hours of sunlight the day of the vernal equinox, some places get a little more (the day is 12 hours and 15 minute in Fairbanks, Alaska), and some get less (it's 12 hours and 6 minutes in Miami).

4. The name means Equal Night.

The word equinox literally translates to equal ("equi") and night ("nox") in Latin. The term vernal means "new and fresh," and comes from the Latin word vernus for "of spring."

5. The 2019 spring equinox coincides with a supermoon.

On March 20, the day the Sun lines up with equator, the Moon will reach the closest point to Earth in its orbit. The Moon will also be full, making it the third supermoon of 2019. A full moon last coincided with the first day of spring on March 20, 1981, and it the two events won't occur within 24 hours of each other again until 2030.

A Full Pink Moon Is Coming in April

Ana Luisa Santo, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0
Ana Luisa Santo, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Mark your calendars for Friday, April 19 and get ready to snap some blurry pictures of the sky on your way to work. A full pink moon will appear early that morning, according to a calendar published by The Old Farmer's Almanac.

Considering that the full moon cycle is completed every 29.5 days, the April full moon will be the fourth full moon of 2019. Despite its name, the surface of the moon doesn't actually appear rosy. The name refers to the wild ground phlox, a type of pink wildflower, that tends to sprout in the U.S. and Canada around this time of year. It's also sometimes called an egg moon, fish moon, or sprouting grass moon.

What does the Full Pink Moon mean?

The April full moon might be a bit of a misnomer, but it still plays a pretty important role in the Christian tradition. The date on which the full pink moon appears has historically been used to determine when Easter will be observed. The holiday always falls on the Sunday following the first full moon that appears after the spring equinox. However, if the full moon falls on a Sunday, Easter will be held the following Sunday.

This rule dates back to 325 C.E., when a group of Christian churches called the First Council of Nicaea decided that the light of the full moon would help guide religious pilgrims as they traveled ahead of the holiday. Since the full moon will be visible on April 19 this year, Easter will be held on April 21.

When to see the full pink moon

The best time to view this April full moon is around 4:12 a.m. on the West Coast and 7:12 a.m. on the East Coast. The exact time will vary depending on your location. For a more specific estimate, head to the Almanac's website and type in your city and state or ZIP code.

If you happen to miss this spectacle because you're enjoying a full night’s sleep, don't fret too much. A full flower moon will be arriving in May.

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