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Don’t Call This Wearable Device a Smartwatch

When attempting to break into the wearable tech market, most companies have modeled their products after the wristwatch. But the flexible electronics startup Polyera followed a different approach by developing a high-tech device that more closely resembles a '90s-era slap bracelet than a conventional timekeeper.

Rather than limiting the interface to a square display, the Wove Band’s 4680-square-millimeter touchscreen wraps around the wearer’s wrist. Polyera has been working on the flexible transistors and display technologies behind their product for a decade, and they’ve recently announced that it's set to hit the market in mid-2016. 

Devices like the Apple Watch and Pebble have popularized the term “smartwatch,” but company CEO and co-founder Phil Inagaki refuses to label their product as such. He prefers names like “device” or “digital canvas,” which is just another way the Wove Band stands out in the fast-growing wearable field. 

The price has yet to be determined, but according to Inagaki, it will cost less than the cheapest Apple Watch. The Wove Band also has the advantage of a screen six times the size of Apple's creation, and preserves battery life by using a low-energy E-Ink frontlayer, which stays on continually. The Android-based device's app-like programs, dubbed “compositions,” are constantly displayed and accessible. The screen is grayscale for now, although the company says they have successfully produced color prototypes.

While there's still room for improvement, the sleek Wove Band could be a huge first step in convincing consumers that wearables can be, well, actually wearable.

[h/t: WIRED]

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architecture
One Photographer's Quest to Document Every Frank Lloyd Wright Structure in the World
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iStock

From California’s Marin County Civic Center to the Yokodo Guest House in Ashiya City, Japan, Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence spans countries and continents. Today, 532 of the architect’s original designs remain worldwide—and one photographer is racking up the miles in an attempt to photograph each and every one of them, according to Architectural Digest.

Andrew Pielage is the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s unofficial photographer. The Phoenix-based shutterbug got his gig after friends introduced him to officials at Taliesin West, the late designer’s onetime winter home and studio that today houses the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

Higher-ups at Taliesin West allowed Pielage to photograph the property in 2011, and they liked his work so much that they commissioned him for other projects. Since then, Pielage has shot around 50 Wright buildings, ranging from Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, to the Hollyhock House in Los Angeles.

Pielage takes vertical panoramas to “get more of Wright in one image,” and he also prefers to work with natural light to emphasize the way the architect integrated his structures to correspond with nature’s rhythms. While Pielage still has over 400 more FLW projects to go until he's done capturing the icon’s breadth of work, you can check out some of his initial shots below.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books

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