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The 20 Most Memorable Teachers in TV History

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Pop quiz: Recall the name of your favorite teacher.

Extra credit: Recall the name of your least favorite teacher.

Regardless of how many years removed you are from your school days, it’s impossible to think back on your educational career without also recalling the teachers who most impacted it. Whether because they were inspirational or horrendously ill-suited for the job, some teachers leave an imprint that stays with you for a lifetime. And the same goes for the fictional teachers who populate the world of television.

In honor of Teachers' Day, we’re paying tribute to the TV teachers who have shaped—and warped—the impressionable minds of generations of television viewers. (Chemistry teachers-turned-kingpins included.)

1. WALTER WHITE // BREAKING BAD

Sure, his lectures were a little dull (even if he did have open flames in his classroom), but no one could ever accuse Mr. White of not knowing his craft. And yes, he did steal equipment from the supply closet a couple of times and keep his burner phone in the classroom ceiling for a while, but he also turned a former flunkie student into his greatest protégé, and taught us all that when you see a product that you could greatly improve, you shouldn’t let little things like a shortage of Sudafed or menacing drug lords get in your way. Also, science has practical applications! Every Breaking Bad fan now knows that if you're going to try to dissolve something in hydrofluoric acid, you'd better do it in a plastic container (not a ceramic bathtub). —Erika Berlin

2. EDNA KRABAPPEL // THE SIMPSONS

Other teachers at Springfield Elementary had their cool character moments, but Mrs. Krabappel was a fan favorite from her first appearance in the series' second-ever episode. Yes, she dated around, drank on the job, and slapped Bart once (ok, twice), but Edna was a teacher who wasn’t afraid to say what she felt, even if those feelings were buried beneath quips and sarcasm. That school would have been boring if not for Edna’s 20-plus years as a teacher to the same fourth grade class. —Andrew LaSane

3. MR. FEENY // BOY MEETS WORLD

It’s easy to forgive Boy Meets World's eyeroll-worthy trope of having the school principal live next door to protagonist Cory Matthews. Not to mention him traveling with Cory and the gang from middle school to high school and then, coincidentally, also becoming a professor at the college that everyone attends because, gosh darn it, Feeny is the best. The well-spoken, well-read, highbrow neighbor transformed over the course of the series—from disciplinarian to teacher to friend to mentor and, finally, to father. As the series drew to a close, we learned that after all Feeny had given to Cory, Topanga, Shawn, Eric, and the rest of his students, the sometime-curmudgeon needed them (and the job) just as much as they needed him. He didn’t travel with them to New York at the end of the show (which they joke about in the final scene: “Come on Feeny, you haven’t even talked to another student in seven years”), but he did make it to Girl Meets World some 14 years later, gracing the audience with a few appearances to remind us that, just like Cory said in that final episode, he’d stay with us always. —Caitlin Schneider

4. MS. FRIZZLE // THE MAGIC SCHOOL BUS

Ms. Frizzle’s mantra was, “Take chances, make mistakes, and get messy!” And what a testament that was to her adventurous, hands-on teaching approach. Ms. Frizzle was the type of teacher who’d literally go the distance in the name of scientific discovery and, as a character, had that fantastical-yet-familiar vibe that made her instantly beloved. From the bottom of the ocean to the edges of outer space, The Friz was blazing trails, setting an example for curiosity and exploration in learning, becoming an emblem for every quirkily-dressed teacher in the world, and doing it all with Liz on her shoulder. (Fun fact: Liz is actually a Jackson's chameleon, not a lizard.) —Caitlin Schneider

5. ROLAND “PREZ” PRYZBYLEWSKI // THE WIRE

As one of the first faces glimpsed in HBO’s drug-war indictment The Wire, a sheepish Roland “Prez” Pryzbylewski appeared to be uncomfortable in his role as an authoritarian: He did his best police work solving puzzles and his worst while holding a gun. Disillusioned, he skittishly entered a new career as a Baltimore public school teacher, where students with one foot already in the criminal trade took advantage of his scrambled confidence. But Prez hung on, learning to navigate a fatally broken educational system. By the end, he was steadier on his feet in front of a classroom than he had ever been as a cop. His real talent wasn’t at a crime scene—it was making sure the city’s youth never got there in the first place. —Jake Rossen

6. MISS BLISS // SAVED BY THE BELL

It’s a shame that the students in Miss Bliss’s class didn’t have enough time to fully appreciate her talents. For 13 episodes she was a surrogate mother, shaping the lives of a group of kids who would inexplicably move their families to Los Angeles and reunite at Bayside High School. She always supported her often misguided class, and her English accent made everything sound, dare we say, blissful. —Andrew LaSane

7. COACH FREDRICKS // FREAKS & GEEKS

Most kids lucky enough to attend public school will remember struggling through the Health component of a physical education class, which was probably led by one of the school’s coaches and completely scripted from an outdated manual. Coach Fredricks was a complex character with stereotypical jock-like tendencies, but he also cared about his students and showed some humanity at various points in the show’s singular season. He had a man-to-man talk with Sam about sex after a porn video confused the geeks, his feelings were hurt by a prank call, and he fell in love with Bill’s mother and genuinely wanted the teenager's approval. The geeks may have hated PE, but deep down they respected Coach Fredricks. —Andrew LaSane

8. MR. GARVEY // KEY & PEELE

Look, no one likes a substitute teacher, and substitute teachers know that better than anyone. They also know that they aren’t really expected to conjugate Latin verbs or supervise frog dissection. Honestly, a substitute’s main objective it to keep the students in line and make sure they all showed up for class, but taking attendance is the worst. Names are pronounced oddly, some kids go by nicknames that aren’t on the official register, and on top of that, high school kids are jerks. So it’s understandable that Mr. Garvey would go into the day with a little trepidation. But props to him for standing his ground, throwing his weight around a little, and not allowing any back talk. Besides, who really knows how to pronounce O’Shaughnessy anyway? —Erika Berlin

9. WILL SCHUESTER // GLEE 

Like Breaking Bad's Water White, Glee's Will Schuester, a.k.a. Mr. Schue, knows of what he teaches. In casting the role of an Ohio high school teacher who reignites the school's glee club, show creator Ryan Murphy spent months observing a number of Broadway actors in order to find just the right fit for the series, and landed on Matthew Morrison. And while he's a teacher who takes the responsibility of enriching the lives of his students very seriously, we also get to see what his own life is like outside of the classroom (which isn't the case with every TV teacher), whether that means witnessing the crumbling of a bad marriage or trying desperately to win the affection of the school's guidance counselor. In the end, at least according to Glee, every problem can be solved with the perfect song. —Jennifer M. Wood

10. MR. GARRISON // SOUTH PARK

For 19 seasons, South Park Elementary’s fourth grade teacher has provided the series with what creator Trey Parker describes as “the soap opera element.” Some of Mr. Garrison's more colorful moments include attempting to assassinate Kathy Lee Gifford, marrying Richard Dawkins, and making a move on Cartman after discovering he was a member of NAMBLA. The character even spent a few seasons living as “Mrs. Janet Garrison” before deciding to undergo a reverse sex change in the episode “Eek, a Penis!” He may not be receiving a "teacher of the year" award any time soon, but Mr. Garrison (and his alter ego/puppet Mr. Hat) has definitely earned the title of one of South Park’s most unique residents. —Michele Debczak

11. MISS CRABTREE // THE LITTLE RASCALS

Not to be confused with Ms. Crabtree, the bus driver from South Park, Miss June Crabtree was the prettiest and nicest teacher that a bunch of rascals could ever hope for. She didn’t appear in many Our Gang shorts, but whenever her finger waves and smile were on screen, everyone was a little bit happier. Miss Crabtree was always sweet to her class, but she wasn’t afraid to punish them for misbehavin’ by sending them out to stand in the hall. —Andrew LaSane

12. MR. KOTTER // WELCOME BACK, KOTTER

Though it's Gabe Kotter's name that appears in the title, it quickly became clear that The Sweathogs—the group of remedial students he was hired to keep in line and, if possible, actually teach—were the real stars of this classic '70s sitcom. Which was just fine with Mr. Kotter (a.k.a. Mr. Kott-air), as he was one of the wayward group's founding members. Which might explain why a teacher would be so willing to let his students invade his life outside of room 111. But like any good story about a group of students who the world doesn't expect much of, Kotter's connection to his students helped him to get through to them in a way that no other adult (teacher or otherwise) ever had. Welcome back! —Jennifer M. Wood

13. JESSICA DAY // NEW GIRL

Don’t let her “adorkable” persona fool you: Jessica Day is a serious and passionate career woman. She’s dealt with a whole lot in only a few seasons—multiple office romances, dating a parent, failed field trips, bullies, weird bosses, strange coworkers, becoming a boss herself, and even helming an adult education creative writing class. It hasn’t always gone smoothly, but Jess’s passion for her students and learning itself have always been the driving force behind her sometimes ill-conceived efforts. She has the kind of determination and single-mindedness about her life’s work that makes her a standout among Nick, Winston, Cece, and even Schmidt. And let’s be honest, her spunk, quirky personality, and penchant for whipping out the guitar to give a lesson make her the kind of teacher we always wish we had. —Caitlin Schneider

14. MR. COLLINS // THE WONDER YEARS

Kevin Arnold's math teacher, Mr. Collins, only appeared in three of The Wonder Years' 115 episodes (four if you count a clip show). But to this day, his storyline remains one of the iconic series's most poignant. Initially portrayed as the "I'm too old for this sh*t" kind of teacher who has lost his enthusiasm for educating the snot-nosed kids who fill his classroom, Mr. Collins's true passion for his job is eventually revealed when he offers to give Kevin, who is struggling in the class, some extra help after school. Though their meetings are strictly business, Kevin is able to glimpse at the man behind the bad suits and comes to think of him as a friend. So when Mr. Collins makes it clear to Kevin that, "I am not your friend Mr. Arnold—I am your teacher," Kevin hits back in the only way his pubescent brain can fathom: He flunks the midterm on purpose. But Mr. Collins gets the final word when, over the weekend following the test, he dies. However, through a posthumous gesture, Kevin gets a second chance at the midterm, and a final opportunity to pay tribute to his dearly departed mentor. Fun fact: Before he was an actor, Steven Gilborn—who portrayed Mr. Collins—was a professor at MIT, Columbia, University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford (where he earned his own Ph.D. in dramatic literature). —Jennifer M. Wood

15. LYDIA GRANT // FAME

Both in front of the camera and behind it, Debbie Allen served as a teacher on the television adaptation of Fame. Reprising her role from the film as Lydia Grant, Allen lays it out for her students when she tells them: "You've got big dreams. You want fame. Well, fame costs. And right here is where you start paying: in sweat." And sweat they did. But Allen's role as a dance teacher didn't end when the camera panned away; she also choreographed the series, and won an Emmy for doing just that. —Jennifer M. Wood

16. MR. KATIMSKI // MY SO-CALLED LIFE

Poor Mr. Katimski had a lot to deal with in the single season My So-Called Life was on the air: In class, he helped both Brian and Jordan figure out their feelings for Angela via Shakespeare. As the drama club's leader, he was doggedly after Rickie to join up. In only four episodes, the perpetually sweater-clad teacher made a memorable mark as he navigated the angsty halls of Liberty High School in a nervous and spacey, yet sweet, way that only made his devotion to his students all the more endearing, even when they didn’t totally appreciate him. He was one of those teachers who was steadfast in a largely thankless role—all for those few punctuated moments of deeply felt success. —Caitlin Schneider

17. MISS BROOKS // OUR MISS BROOKS

When English teacher Connie Brooks would complain of being underpaid—and she did, often—teachers across the country rejoiced. Here was a portrayal of the profession that didn’t mince words. One of TV’s earliest educators, Brooks (played by Eve Arden) refused to conform to the stereotypical image of a mechanical authority figure. When a student drew graffiti on a wall, Brooks didn’t run to the principal’s office—she rushed to paint over it. Nor did she ignore the fact that teachers had feelings, too. (In Brooks’ case, it was unrequited love for fellow teacher Mr. Boynton.) After the series ended in 1956, Arden got the ultimate compliment: several job offers to teach. —Jake Rossen

18. CHUCK NOBLET // STRANGERS WITH CANDY

Before Stephen Colbert had his own late-night talk show, he played Chuck Noblet, a history instructor who provided the teenagers of Flatpoint High with bad advice and even more questionable classroom lectures. Noblet is mean to most of his students, but especially cruel toward fortysomething freshman Jerri Blank. However, some might say his meanness stems from a deep-rooted unhappiness—not an actual dislike toward Jerri. Noblet is an educator, yet he longs to become a rock star. He’s married to a woman, but he’s secretly having an affair with his co-worker, Mr. Jellineck. These dual identities cause him to resent Jerri, whose personality is brash yet honest—a quality Noblet feels like he can never possess. —Kirstin Fawcett

19. ANNALISE KEATING // HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER

Sure her methods are unconventional and she's been a bit preoccupied this semester, what with her cheating husband being accused of murder and then “disappearing,” but in-demand defense attorney and criminal law professor Annalise Keating also successfully mentored five students, won a handful of cases, and kept her gang of murdering, evidence-destroying interns out of prison—and presumably with solid GPAs to boot. Though learning textbook case law is all well and good, Keating’s pragmatic, brutally honest lessons are what's really going to help get her students jobs after graduation (and keep them out of the pen). "There’s no truth in the courtroom. There’s just your version of what happened versus theirs," she says, always urging her students to think harder, dig deeper, and be more creative in their approach. "That’s how the justice system works. It’s not what’s right and what’s fair. It’s who tells the most convincing story." —Erika Berlin

20. DEE REYNOLDS // IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA

Deandra “Sweet Dee" Reynolds has dabbled in many occupations during It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia's 10 (and counting) seasons. She has been a street performer, a surrogate mother, and a YouTube star, but perhaps her most questionable career move was her stint as a high school drama teacher. One of her first actions was putting on a performance of Frankenstein, which she then used as a vehicle to recapture her high school glory days by playing the title role. She finally got booted from the job after taking her class to Paddy’s Pub to watch the gang’s reenactment of Lethal Weapon 5. Though her teaching career may have been brief, it was memorable nonetheless. —Michele Debczak

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25 Wonderful Facts About It’s a Wonderful Life
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Paramount Pictures

Mary Owen wasn’t welcomed into the world until more than a decade after Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life made its premiere in 1946. But she grew up cherishing the film and getting the inside scoop on its making from its star, Donna Reed—who just so happens to be her mom. Though Reed passed away in 1986, Owen has stood as one of the film’s most dedicated historians, regularly introducing screenings of the ultimate holiday classic, including during its annual run at New York City’s IFC Center. She shared some of her mom’s memories with us to help reveal 25 things you might not have known about It’s a Wonderful Life.

1. IT ALL BEGAN WITH A CHRISTMAS CARD.

After years of unsuccessfully trying to shop his short story, The Greatest Gift, to publishers, Philip Van Doren Stern decided to give the gift of words to his closest friends for the holidays when he printed up 200 copies of the story and sent them out as a 21-page Christmas card. David Hempstead, a producer at RKO Pictures, ended up getting a hold of it, and purchased the movie rights for $10,000.

2. CARY GRANT WAS SET TO STAR IN THE ADAPTATION.

When RKO purchased the rights, they did so with the plan of having Cary Grant in the lead. But, as happens so often in Hollywood, the project went through some ups and downs in the development process. In 1945, after a number of rewrites, RKO sold the movie rights to Frank Capra, who quickly recruited Jimmy Stewart to play George Bailey.

3. DOROTHY PARKER WORKED ON THE SCRIPT.


Getty Images

By the time It’s a Wonderful Life made it into theaters, the story was much different from Stern’s original tale. That’s because more than a half-dozen people contributed to the screenplay, including some of the most acclaimed writers of the time—Dorothy Parker, Dalton Trumbo, Marc Connelly, and Clifford Odets among them.

4. SCREENWRITERS FRANCES GOODRICH AND ALBERT HACKETT WALKED OUT.

Though they’re credited as the film’s screenwriters with Capra, the husband and wife writing duo were not pleased with the treatment they received from Capra. “Frank Capra could be condescending,” Hackett said in an interview, “and you just didn't address Frances as ‘my dear woman.’ When we were pretty far along in the script but not done, our agent called and said, ‘Capra wants to know how soon you'll be finished.’ Frances said, ‘We're finished right now.’ We put our pens down and never went back to it.”

5. CAPRA DIDN’T DO THE BEST JOB OF SELLING THE FILM TO STEWART.

After laying out the plot line of the film for Stewart in a meeting, Capra realized that, “This really doesn’t sound so good, does it?” Stewart recalled in an interview. Stewart’s reply? “Frank: If you want me to be in a picture about a guy that wants to kill himself and an angel comes down named Clarence who can’t swim and I save him, when do we start?”

6. IT WAS DONNA REED’S FIRST STARRING ROLE.


Getty Images

Though Donna Reed was hardly a newcomer when It’s a Wonderful Life rolled around, having appeared in nearly 20 projects previously, the film did mark her first starring role. It’s difficult to imagine anyone else in the role today, but Reed had some serious competition from Jean Arthur. “[Frank Capra] had seen mom in They Were Expendable and liked her,” Mary Owen told Mental Floss. “When Capra met my mother at MGM, he knew she'd be just right for Mary Bailey.”

7. MARY OWEN IS NOT NAMED AFTER MARY BAILEY.

Before you ask whether Owen was named after her mom’s much beloved It’s a Wonderful Life character, “The answer is no,” says Owen. “I was named after my great grandmother, Mary Mullenger.”

8. BEULAH BONDI WAS A PRO AT PLAYING STEWART’S MOM.

Beulah Bondi, who plays Mrs. Bailey, didn’t need a lot of rehearsal to play Jimmy Stewart’s mom. She had done it three times previously—in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Of Human Hearts, and Vivacious Lady—and once later on The Jimmy Stewart Show: The Identity Crisis.

9. CAPRA, REED, AND STEWART HAVE ALL CALLED IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE THEIR FAVORITE MOVIE.


Liberty Films

Though their collective filmographies consist of a couple hundred movies, Capra, Reed, and Stewart have all cited It’s a Wonderful Life as their favorite movie. In his autobiography, The Name Above the Title, Capra took that praise even one step further, writing: “I thought it was the greatest film I ever made. Better yet, I thought it was the greatest film anybody ever made.”

10. THE MOVIE BOMBED AT THE BOX OFFICE.

Though it has become a quintessential American classic, It’s a Wonderful Life was not an immediate hit with audiences. In fact, it put Capra $525,000 in the hole, which left him scrambling to finance his production company’s next picture, State of the Union.

11. A COPYRIGHT LAPSE AIDED THE FILM’S POPULARITY.

Though it didn’t make much of a dent at the box office, It’s a Wonderful Life found a whole new life on television—particularly when its copyright lapsed in 1974, making it available royalty-free to anyone who wanted to show it for the next 20 years. (Which would explain why it was on television all the time during the holiday season.) The free-for-all ended in 1994.

12. THE ROCK THAT BROKE THE WINDOW OF THE GRANVILLE HOUSE WAS ALL REAL.


Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain 

Though Capra had a stuntman at the ready in order to shoot out the window of the Granville House in a scene that required Donna Reed to throw a rock through it, it was all a waste of money. “Mom threw the rock herself that broke the window in the Granville House,” Owen says. “On the first try.”

13. IT TOOK TWO MONTHS TO BUILD BEDFORD FALLS.

Shot on a budget of $3.7 million (which was a lot by mid-1940s standards), Bedford Falls—which covered a full four acres of RKO’s Encino Ranch—was one of the most elaborate movie sets ever built up to that time, with 75 stores and buildings, 20 fully-grown oak trees, factories, residential areas, and a 300-yard-long Main Street.

14. SENECA FALLS, NEW YORK IS “THE REAL BEDFORD FALLS.”

Though Bedford Falls is a fictitious place, the town of Seneca Falls, New York swears that it's the real-life inspiration for George Bailey’s charming hometown. And each year they program a full lineup of holiday-themed events to put locals (and yuletide visitors) into the holiday spirit.

15. THE GYM FLOOR-TURNED-SWIMMING POOL WAS REAL.

Though the bulk of the film was filmed on pre-built sets, the dance at the gym was filmed on location at Beverly Hills High School. And the retractable floor was no set piece. Better known as the Swim Gym, the school is currently in the process of restoring the landmark filming location.

16. ALFALFA IS THE TEENAGER BEHIND THAT SWIMMING POOL PRANK.

Though he’s uncredited in the part, if Freddie Othello—the little prankster who pushes the button that opens the pool that swallows George and Mary up—looks familiar, that’s because he is played by Carl Switzer, a.k.a. Alfalfa of The Little Rascals.

17. DONNA REED WON $50 FROM LIONEL BARRYMORE ... FOR MILKING A COW.

Though she was a Hollywood icon, Donna Reed—born Donnabelle Mullenger—was a farm girl at heart who came to Los Angeles by way of Denison, Iowa. Lionel Barrymore (a.k.a. Mr. Potter) didn’t believe it. “So he bet $50 that she couldn't milk a cow,” recalls Owen. “She said it was the easiest $50 she ever made.”

18. THE FILM WAS SHOT DURING A HEAT WAVE.

It may be an iconic Christmas movie, but It’s a Wonderful Life was actually shot in the summer of 1946—in the midst of a heat wave, no less. At one point, Capra had to shut filming down for a day because of the sky-high temperatures—which also explains why Stewart is clearly sweating in key moments of the film.

19. CAPRA ENGINEERED A NEW KIND OF MOVIE SNOW.

Capra—who trained as an engineer—and special effects supervisor Russell Shearman engineered a new type of artificial snow for the film. At the time, painted cornflakes were the most common form of fake snow, but they posed a bit of an audio problem for Capra. So he and Shearman opted to mix foamite (the stuff you find in fire extinguishers) with sugar and water to create a less noisy option.

20. THE MOVIE WASN’T REQUIRED VIEWING IN REED’S HOUSEHOLD.

Though It’s a Wonderful Life is a staple of many family holiday movie marathons, that wasn’t the case in Reed’s home. In fact, Owen herself didn’t see the film until three decades after its release. “I saw it in the late 1970s at the Nuart Theatre in L.A. and loved it,” she says.

21. ZUZU DIDN’T SEE THE FILM UNTIL 1980.

Karolyn Grimes, who played Zuzu in the film, didn’t see the film until 1980. “I never took the time to see the movie,” she told Detroit’s WWJ in 2013. “I never just sat down and watched the film.”

22. THE FBI SAW THE FILM. THEY DIDN’T LIKE IT.

In 1947, the FBI issued a memo noting the film as a potential “Communist infiltration of the motion picture industry,” citing its “rather obvious attempts to discredit bankers by casting Lionel Barrymore as a ‘Scrooge-type’ so that he would be the most hated man in the picture. This, according to these sources, is a common trick used by Communists.”

23. THE MOVIE’S BERT AND ERNIE HAVE NO RELATION TO SESAME STREET.

Yes, the cop and cab driver in It’s a Wonderful Life are named Bert and Ernie, respectively. But Jim Henson’s longtime writing partner, Jerry Juhl, insists that it’s by coincidence only that they share their names with Sesame Street’s stripe-shirted buds. “I was the head writer for the Muppets for 36 years and one of the original writers on Sesame Street,” Juhl told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2000. “The rumor about It's a Wonderful Life has persisted over the years. I was not present at the naming, but I was always positive [the rumor] was incorrect. Despite his many talents, Jim had no memory for details like this. He knew the movie, of course, but would not have remembered the cop and the cab driver. I was not able to confirm this with Jim before he died, but shortly thereafter I spoke to Jon Stone, Sesame Street's first producer and head writer and a man largely responsible for the show's format … He assured me that Ernie and Bert were named one day when he and Jim were studying the prototype puppets. They decided that one of them looked like an Ernie, and the other one looked like a Bert. The movie character names are purely coincidental.”

24. SOME PEOPLE ARE ANXIOUS FOR A SEQUEL.

Well, two people: Producers Allen J. Schwalb and Bob Farnsworth, who announced in 2013 that they would be continuing the story with a sequel, It’s a Wonderful Life: The Rest of the Story, which they planned for a 2015 release. It didn’t take long for Paramount, which owns the copyright, to step in and assure furious fans of the original film that “No project relating to It’s a Wonderful Life can proceed without a license from Paramount. To date, these individuals have not obtained any of the necessary rights, and we would take all appropriate steps to protect those rights.”

25. THE FILM’S ENDURING LEGACY WAS SURPRISING TO CAPRA.

“It’s the damnedest thing I’ve ever seen," Capra said of the film’s classic status. "The film has a life of its own now and I can look at it like I had nothing to do with it. I’m like a parent whose kid grows up to be president. I’m proud… but it’s the kid who did the work. I didn’t even think of it as a Christmas story when I first ran across it. I just liked the idea.”

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Listen to What Darth Vader Sounded Like On the Star Wars Set
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The voice of Darth Vader, provided by James Earl Jones, is one of the most iconic aspects of the original Star Wars movies. But James Earl Jones wasn't the actor wearing that outfit—it was British actor David Prowse, who was cast in part because he was huge (reportedly 6'5" and a former body-building champion).

George Lucas always intended to replace Prowse's voice, but it's still a bit of a shock to hear a muffled British voice coming out of Darth Vader's helmet. Here's video showing what Darth Vader sounded like on the set before James Earl Jones re-recorded the dialogue.

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