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Screenshot via Chambong
Screenshot via Chambong

A Beer Bong for Champagne Drinkers

Screenshot via Chambong
Screenshot via Chambong

“Shooting” beers is basically a revered sport on college campuses nationwide, but not everyone enjoys the taste of a good brew, and some just aren't into the idea of communal beer bongs. To get those wannabe athletes in the game and “push the limits of a party science,” the founders and inventors of Chambong designed a wine glass for guzzling champagne. The barware, made of high borosilicate glass, is part flute and part open-ended funnel, with a curved stem so that the liquid stays inside until tilted.

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According to the Chambong website, the dishwasher-safe glasses hold four ounces of champagne (a disclaimer warns that using any other liquid is regarded as a "misuse of the product") and will cost you $25. Check out the video below to see how they're made.

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Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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