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Michael Najjar via Kameha Grand Zurich Hotel

This Space-Themed Hotel Suite Was Designed By an Aspiring Astronaut

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Michael Najjar via Kameha Grand Zurich Hotel

For those who dream of living like an astronaut without the inconvenience of atrophy and motion sickness, one hotel is now offering guests a luxurious outer-space experience. At the Kameha Grand Zurich Hotel in Switzerland you can lodge in their space suite for $2000 a night (still a bargain compared to what a commercial space flight would cost).

When entering, guests are greeted by a robotic female voice inspired by John Carpenter’s 1974 sci-fi film Dark Star. The carpet is designed with inverted, high-res images taken by the Hubble Telescope that have been stitched together to form an abstract space scene. The ceiling lights were made to resemble rocket engines, and a space suit glove extends out from the wall as a spot for lodgers to keep their phones and keys. The room's most impressive feature is its “zero gravity” bed. It’s built in a way that makes it appear as if it’s floating above the floor, and the black, monolith design is reminiscent of 2001: A Space Odyssey

Michael Najjar

Michael Najjar

Michael Najjar

Michael Najjar

Everything was designed by German artist and aspiring astronaut Michael Najjar. Though he’s still waiting to travel to outer space, he’s undergone plenty of realistic space training in Russia including a spacewalk simulation, centrifuge training and jet flights into the stratosphere. He plans to join Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic Pioneer Astronauts on their spaceflight, which would make him the first contemporary artist in space. His lifetime fascination with space travel comes through in his work, which has been displayed at museums and galleries around the world. A few of his pieces, “Liquid Gravity,” “Space Voyagers” and “Orbital Cascade,” can be seen hanging on the walls of the space suite.

The suite is just one of the hotel's several themed rooms, others which include a casino room, a burlesque suite, and a sports-themed room complete with a foosball table and punching bag. Though the space suite may lean more toward fiction than science, it definitely looks more comfortable than a night in the International Space Station. 

All Images Courtesy Kameha Grand Zurich Hotel

[h/t: Mashable]

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architecture
One Photographer's Quest to Document Every Frank Lloyd Wright Structure in the World
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iStock

From California’s Marin County Civic Center to the Yokodo Guest House in Ashiya City, Japan, Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence spans countries and continents. Today, 532 of the architect’s original designs remain worldwide—and one photographer is racking up the miles in an attempt to photograph each and every one of them, according to Architectural Digest.

Andrew Pielage is the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s unofficial photographer. The Phoenix-based shutterbug got his gig after friends introduced him to officials at Taliesin West, the late designer’s onetime winter home and studio that today houses the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

Higher-ups at Taliesin West allowed Pielage to photograph the property in 2011, and they liked his work so much that they commissioned him for other projects. Since then, Pielage has shot around 50 Wright buildings, ranging from Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, to the Hollyhock House in Los Angeles.

Pielage takes vertical panoramas to “get more of Wright in one image,” and he also prefers to work with natural light to emphasize the way the architect integrated his structures to correspond with nature’s rhythms. While Pielage still has over 400 more FLW projects to go until he's done capturing the icon’s breadth of work, you can check out some of his initial shots below.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books

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