As far as dinner party tricks go, the only thing cooler than the tablecloth trick is sabrageand while an actual saber gives the performance greater dramatic effect, we’re guessing you probably don't have one of those hanging out in the junk closet.

Instead, consider the steel “Champagne Sabre” from Menu, which looks less a sword and more like a curved, futuristic baseball bat. The lack of sharp edges might seem disconcerting, but in fact, this modern mallet is a testament that the trick is more about technique and less about the instrument.

As Gizmodo notes, a French bottle of champagne is ideal because of the thick glass and high internal pressure, and the key is to “strike right at the lip, where there is a seam that concentrates all the stress from that pressure on the bottle—the weakest point.” And oh yeah—point it away from yourself and your guests.

Sabrage is said to have originated during the Napoleonic wars, though the specifics are a bit murky. According to some reports, soldiers had a tough time poppin’ bottles on horseback following their victories and learned to multitask in a very badass fashion—possibly to impress Madame Clicquot, who inherited her husband’s company when he died and was said to hand officers bottles of bubbly to enjoy pre-battle. It might be worth channeling that imagery and spirit the first few times you attempt to behead a bottle of bubbly. 

Before you do that though, get a full tutorial below, via Food52.