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6 Awesome Mancaves With Hidden Entrances

Checklists for designing and building the perfect chill spot in a home should all include the same essential elements: Comfortable seating, space for entertaining guests, and a secret entrance. A mancave without a secret entrance is basically just a basement, and no one has enjoyed hanging out in a basement since That '70s Show. Classic hidden door mechanisms like rotating bookcases and trick wall panels never get old, but pop culture has also inspired people to be more creative with their upgraded spaces. Here are six cool mancaves that will inspire you to call a contractor.

1. $50,000 ELDER SCROLLS BASEMENT

Nothing says fandom quite like spending $50,000 to replicate the world of your favorite role-playing fantasy video game in the basement of your home. It’s pretty cool that this guy’s father was on board to help bring this dream to life with such attention to detail, and that his wife saw the vision and wanted to help with the design.

2. BOOKCASE SMOKING PARLOR

Imgur

After a long day of work, it sometimes feels nice to just throw on a robe and sneak into your dimly lit smoking lounge for a cigar and a glass of cognac. The vintage map, model ship, and electric fireplace work perfectly in the small space, and the Raiders of the Lost Ark idol replica is a nice touch.

3. $2 MILLION BATCAVE THEATER

Batman’s secret headquarters is one of the most iconic hidden spaces in pop culture history, and Elite Home Theater Seating did a great job capturing the essence of the cave for this concept space (which was later built somewhere in Greenwich, Connecticut). From the stalactite ceilings to the alcoves that display a replica of the Tumbler and other Dark Knight paraphernalia, Bruce Wayne himself would love to spend some quality brooding time here. The kicker is that this theater can only be accessed through a Batman-themed study, where a grandfather clock hides a fingerprint scanner-controlled elevator.

4. "DOORS OF DURIN" SECRET PASSAGEWAY

You don’t have to be a member of the Fellowship to appreciate how cool this is—though some knowledge of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings series is helpful to understand the design. The owner of the magical door says that a voice-activated control is coming soon (in the novel the word “mellon” opens the door), but we think it’s cool just the way it is.

5. CLASSIC SLIDING DOOR

Hidden rooms with sliding doors automatically feel cooler because it’s such a mysterious and spy-worthy feature. The company that made this video owns the domain hiddenpassageway.com, which showcases other examples of their work. This particular room is in the home of an unnamed Hollywood producer.

6. TARDIS HIDDEN THEATER

Having a replica of the TARDIS from Doctor Who in the corner of a room isn’t the most inconspicuous thing someone can do, but even fans of the show who know that the police box is bigger on the inside wouldn’t expect to find this. Designed by the Maryland-based Gramophone, this TARDIS leads to a full home theater with a 100” screen, starry ceiling, and other sci-fi-influenced features that would make any Whovian envious.

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iStock
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architecture
One Photographer's Quest to Document Every Frank Lloyd Wright Structure in the World
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iStock

From California’s Marin County Civic Center to the Yokodo Guest House in Ashiya City, Japan, Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence spans countries and continents. Today, 532 of the architect’s original designs remain worldwide—and one photographer is racking up the miles in an attempt to photograph each and every one of them, according to Architectural Digest.

Andrew Pielage is the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s unofficial photographer. The Phoenix-based shutterbug got his gig after friends introduced him to officials at Taliesin West, the late designer’s onetime winter home and studio that today houses the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

Higher-ups at Taliesin West allowed Pielage to photograph the property in 2011, and they liked his work so much that they commissioned him for other projects. Since then, Pielage has shot around 50 Wright buildings, ranging from Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, to the Hollyhock House in Los Angeles.

Pielage takes vertical panoramas to “get more of Wright in one image,” and he also prefers to work with natural light to emphasize the way the architect integrated his structures to correspond with nature’s rhythms. While Pielage still has over 400 more FLW projects to go until he's done capturing the icon’s breadth of work, you can check out some of his initial shots below.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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Made.com
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Art
What the Homes of the Future Will Look Like, According to Kids
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Made.com

Ask a futurist what the house of tomorrow will feature and she might mention automatic appliances and robot assistants. Ask a kid the same question and you’ll get answers that are slightly more creative, but not altogether impractical. That’s what Made.com discovered when they launched Homes of the Future, a project that had kids draw illustrations of futuristic homes that served as the basis for professional 3D renderings.

According to Co.Design, the UK-based furniture retailer recruited children ages 4 to 12 to submit their architectural ideas. The doodles, sketched in pen, marker, and colored pencil, showcase the grade-schoolers' imaginations. Paired with each picture is concept art made with a 3D illustrator that shows what the homes might look like in the real world.

The designs range from colorful and whimsical to coldly realistic. In one blueprint, drawn by Ameen, age 10, a neighborhood of rainbow buildings and flowers float among the clouds. Another sketch by Ellis, age 7, shows a “home built to last” with titanium, bricks, a steel roof, and bulletproof windows. Some kids seemed less concerned with durability than they were with the tastiness of the infrastructure. Cherry-flavored bricks, candy windows, and a giant jelly slide were just some of the features built into the future homes. Sustainability was also a major theme, with solar panels appearing on two of the houses.

Check out the original artwork and the 3D versions of their ideas below.

House of the future drawn by kid.

House of the future drawn by kid.

House of the future drawn by kid.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Made.com.

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