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When Evacuating Hospitals, Some People Use Baby Aprons

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Evacuating any building is a big job, but evacuating a hospital presents a special logistical problem. Many of the building’s inhabitants are unable to walk, especially down multiple flights of stairs, and many are hooked up to monitors or life support. To make sure everyone can get out safely, hospitals call on an entire industry of specialized evacuation equipment. 

Some of these ideas are obvious. Others (like the “make a slide out of mattresses!” method) seem ill advised at best. And then there are the ones, like the baby apron, that you just don’t see coming. 

The baby apron, or “infant rescue vest,” is exactly what it sounds like. In the event of an emergency in the neonatal unit, a hospital staffer puts on the flame-retardant apron, then fills each oversized pocket with a baby. The design of one version included a cloth baby seat inside each pocket and mesh panels so the babies could, you know, breathe.

It may look absurd, but the baby apron makes a lot of sense. Staffers can carry multiple babies at a time while keeping their hands free. There’s no chance of losing track of a little patient, and the babies get the added security of sustained human contact. Of course, like any evacuation technique, the baby apron does have its down side: Infants that leave the building in the pockets of a staffer have to stay there. And there is always the very real risk of a rescuer falling down with pockets full of babies.

Still, today, the baby-apron market is booming. Hundreds of hospitals around the world have adopted the so-called kangaroo method. There are aprons with pockets for two, three, four, five, and even six babies (a model the Los Angeles Times called a “six-pack”). There’s the Safe Babies Apron and the Baby Mover.

The baby apron is just one of many evacuation options for tiny patients. Evacuation supply catalogs also offer “chairs” that look like shoe organizers on wheels and padded carriers that look like insulated pizza delivery boxes.

Evacuation is not a joke. It’s vital that hospitals have efficient, tested, and practical ways to get their patients to safety. Still, there’s no denying that babies make everything—even danger—a little cuter.

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The TSA's Top 10 Strangest Finds of 2017
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Airport security checkpoints are dull for everyone except Bob Burns, the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) witty social media lead. For the uninitiated, Burns—who’s also known as “Blogger Bob”—keeps track of the strange, hilarious, and dangerous things people try bringing on planes, and posts pictures of the more unusual items onto the organization's Instagram page. Among the many strange items Burns has encountered are countless knives and guns, a tiny dog trapped in a checked suitcase, a sandwich slicer, and even a life-size corpse prop from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

Bob Burns, the TSA's social media lead
Courtesy of Bob Burns

To commemorate yet another year on the job filled with bizarre checkpoint finds, Burns recently created the video below. It highlights the top 10 weirdest TSA finds from 2017, which range from bladed metal knuckles Burns dubbed “Satan’s Pizza Cutter” to narcotics disguised as Christmas presents.

“We hate to tear open a perfectly wrapped gift, but as you can see from this [video], the contents of the gifts aren’t always sweaters, socks, and underwear,” Burns tells Mental Floss.

While making the video, Burns didn’t have pictures on hand of every single strange object he wanted to include. If so, he might have added a weaponized paint roller that was discovered inside a carry-on bag at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport. It “looks like something out of a Mad Max movie,” Burns says. “It’s as if Mad Max wanted to paint the Thunderdome with the blood of his victims. It’s a paint roller wrapped in sandpaper and wire with nails protruding.”

A weaponized paint roller discovered by the TSA in 2017
Courtesy of Bob Burns

Other items that weren't captured in Burns's video that piqued the social media guru’s interest included grenade-shaped salt and pepper shakers and a knife concealed inside a container of Dove men’s deodorant. “Now I get why [the label] reads ’48 hours of protection,'” Burns says.

A knife hidden inside a deodorant container, discovered by the TSA in 2017
Courtesy of Bob Burns

Watch the video below to view Burns’s entire top 10 list of unusual checkpoint finds, and when you're done, check out the TSA's Instagram for more of his signature hilarity.

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Declared Dead, Spanish Prisoner Wakes Up in Morgue Just Before His Autopsy 
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A prisoner in northern Spain survived his "death" and lived to tell the tale when he woke up in a hospital mortuary after being officially certified as deceased. He was scheduled for an autopsy, and remains under hospital observation in Oviedo, Spain, according to the BBC.

Gonzalo Montoya Jiménez, 29, was discovered unconscious in his cell on Sunday, January 7, Spanish news outlets report. It's now thought that he might have suffered from catalepsy, a condition in which people become immobile and cease responding to external stimuli. With waxy, flexible limbs and slowed vital signs, patients with catalepsy can appear dead—which might be why not one but three physicians concluded that Jiménez had crossed over to the other side. 

Jiménez was moved to the Institute of Legal Medicine in Oviedo after doctors ordered an autopsy on the inmate's body, IFL Science reports. Family members—who had been informed that Jiménez was dead—said the prisoner’s body was already marked up for dissecting when he began showing signs of life. A forensic team noticed and moved Jiménez to an intensive care unit, where the patient ultimately regained both his memory and speech.

Catalepsy is associated with epilepsy, schizophrenia, nervous system drug toxicity, and other conditions, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Jiménez reportedly has epilepsy, and it's unclear whether prison doctors knew that when they first declared him dead. 

[h/t BBC News]

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