CLOSE
iStock
iStock

Can a Full Bladder Make You a Better Liar?

iStock
iStock

Your little white lie might go over best if you say it right before you head to the bathroom. A new study finds that a full bladder makes people more natural liars. The study is published in Consciousness and Cognition

In order to examine what’s called the inhibitory-spillover effect, in which the act of performing one task helps us to accomplish another, Claremont Graduate University and California State University–Fullerton researchers had participants drink water, and then lie.

After all participants used the bathroom to ensure a level playing field, they were divided into two groups. One group was instructed to drink five cups of water, while the other group, the control, was told to drink just five sips. Both groups waited about 45 minutes, enough time for the full-bladder group to begin to feel antsy about needing to pee. Then, randomly selected participants sat down with an interviewer and lied about their opinions on certain topics, attempting to convince the interviewer of their sincerity. (They were told they would receive gift cards for fooling the interviewers.) Other participants were told to tell the truth about their opinions. The interactions were taped, and later another group of observers watched the videos to judge the participants' behavior. They assessed apparent levels of anxiety and confidence to determine whether it seemed like that person was lying or telling the truth. 

The participants who had full bladders were deemed better liars. They showed fewer behaviors that might indicate they were lying, and more that indicated they were telling the truth—and they told longer, more complex fabrications than the people who really were telling the truth. The same pattern did not apply to those who only drank a little water, and so didn't have any bladder pressure to distract them. 

The results suggest that holding a full bladder boosted the liars’ ability to inhibit their instinctive truth-telling tendencies. Normally, in order to lie, you have to overcome a natural inclination to tell the truth, which requires a certain degree of conscious control over that instinct. It could be that because the participants' full bladders distracted them from the task at hand, they didn't focus as much on the act of lying, which in turn made them behave more naturally during their deception. 

Though it may seem like a strange connection, previous research has also indicated that the self-control you exert to keep from wetting yourself can spill over into other domains of self-control, like waiting longer for a larger reward.   

But before you try out this method, ask yourself: Are these benefits worth a bladder infection? 

[h/t: The Cut]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Art
The Simple Optical Illusion That Makes an Image Look Like It's Drawing Itself
iStock
iStock

Artist James Nolan Gandy invents robot arms that sketch intricate mathematical shapes with pen and paper. When viewed in real time, the effect is impressive. But it becomes even more so when the videos are sped up in a timelapse. If you look closely in the video below, the illustration appears to materialize faster than the robot can put the design to paper. Gizmodo recently explained how the illusion works to make it look like parts of the sketch are forming before the machine has time to draw them.

The optical illusion isn’t an example of tricky image editing: It’s the result of something called the wagon wheel effect. You can observe this in a car wheel accelerating down the highway or in propeller blades lifting up a helicopter. If an object makes enough rotations per second, it can appear to slow down, move backwards, or even stand still.

This is especially apparent on film. Every “moving image” we see on a screen is an illusion caused by the brain filling in the gaps between a sequence of still images. In the case of the timelapse video below, the camera captured the right amount of images, in the right order, to depict the pen as moving more slowly than it did in real life. But unlike the pen, the drawing formed throughout the video isn't subject to the wagon-wheel effect, so it still appears to move at full speed. This difference makes it look like the sketch is drawing itself, no pen required.

Gandy frequently shares behind-the-scenes videos of his mechanical art on his Instagram page. You can check out some of his non-timelapse clips like the one below to better understand how his machines work, then visit his website to browse and purchase the art made by his 'bots.

And if you think his stuff is impressive, make sure to explore some of the incredible art robots have made in the past.

[h/t Gizmodo]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
science
Narcissists Are More Likely to Be Compulsive Facebook Users
iStock
iStock

Updating your Facebook status throughout the day is probably a sign you need a different hobby, but according to a new study, the habit can also indicate something else. As PsyPost reports, people with Facebook addiction are also likely to be narcissists.

For their recent study published in the journal PLOS One, scientists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum in Germany followed the Facebook activity of 179 German students over the course of a year. They were looking for cases of so-called Facebook Addiction Disorder (FAD) based on the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale, a system developed by University of Bergen researchers that measures factors like mood modification, withdrawal, and relapse in relation to Facebook use.

They wanted to find out whether FAD was linked to other mental health problems. In addition to gauging Facebook compulsion, they also surveyed subjects on their depression and anxiety levels, social support systems, physical health, narcissism, and general satisfaction with life. The results showed a strong correlation between FAD and narcissism. Rather than Facebook making its users more narcissistic, the researchers state that people with narcissistic personalities are at a greater risk of developing the social media addiction.

"Facebook use holds a particular meaning for narcissistic people," they write in the paper. "On Facebook, they can quickly initiate many superficial relationships with new Facebook-friends and get a large audience for their well-planned self-presentation. The more Facebook-friends they have, the higher is the possibility that they attain the popularity and admiration they are seeking; whereas in the offline world they might not be as popular since their interaction partners can quickly perceive their low agreeableness and exaggerated sense of self-importance."

The researchers also found a connection between Facebook addiction and higher levels of stress, depression, and anxiety.

Studies investigating Facebook Addiction Disorder have been conducted in the past, but there’s still not enough research to classify it as an official behavioral addiction. The researchers hope their work will lead to similar studies pinning down a link between FAD and mental health consequences.

[h/t PsyPost]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios