This Edible Water Blob Could Change Hydration Forever

It can be tough to get your recommended daily intake of water, but one innovation is making it easier than ever to keep a bottle, or blob, of H2O on hand. Ooho!—an inexpensive, biodegradable "water bottle" that’s paving the way for the future of hydration—first came to the public's attention in 2013.

Created by Rodrigo García González, Guillaume Couche, and Pierre Paslier of Skipping Rocks Lab in London, the orb (which Fast Company once described as looking like a silicone implant) is created by taking a frozen ball of water, then covering it in layers of membrane made from seaweed extract. The process is a riff on a culinary technique called spherification, which is appropriate given that the gelatinous coating is edible.

Back in 2015, Ooho! received a $22,500 sustainability award from the EU, and now it looks like these water blobs could be ready for tossing into your bag on the way out the door in the near future. Designboom reports that the company will begin testing out their water bubbles at major sporting events in 2018.

Ooho! does have serious potential when it comes to environmental efforts: In America alone, 50 billion plastic bottles are used annually, and the spherical Ooho! packaging could one day bump petroleum-based plastic from store shelves. But if the idea of biting into a water blob weirds you out, don’t worry, it’s not a must.

"At the end of the day you don’t have to eat it," Paslier told The Guardian. "But the edible part shows how natural it is. People are really enthusiastic about the fact that you can create a material for packaging matter that is so harmless that you can eat it."

So natural in fact, that you can even make them yourself at home—though, to be honest, the tap might be easier in that case.

To see what it’s like to hydrate with Ooho!, check out the video below.

An earlier version of this article appeared in 2015.

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iStock
Want to Boost Your Home's Value By More Than $6000? Paint Your Front Door Black
iStock
iStock

If you're looking to sell your home, you may want to take some advice from The Rolling Stones and paint it black. Just the front door, that is. That's because front doors in shades of black or charcoal tend to raise a home's value by $6271, according to a new analysis by real estate website Zillow.

"For a seller, painting a front door is one the least expensive home prep projects, but also one that can have a powerful impact on a home's sale price," Kerrie Kelly, a home design expert for Zillow, said in a statement.

However, this may have more to do with the contrast than the colors themselves. Kelly said more subdued hues like beige and light blue are still popular, but real estate experts have seen a trend toward "pops of color, particularly in darker hues" like dark blue, gray, and black. "Contrasting colors, especially in kitchens and home exteriors add interest and dimension to a room that plays very well in listing photos and videos," Kelly says.

Also popular are "tuxedo kitchens," in which the countertop and upper cabinets are either black or white, and the lower cabinets are painted in contrast. That design scheme can raise a home's value about $1550, Zillow reports.

For its 2018 Paint Color Analysis, Zillow looked at more than 135,000 photos of homes sold across the country between 2010 and 2018 and compared their closing prices to those of similar homes with white walls. In doing so, they were able to conclude which color schemes are considered most valuable.

Other paint jobs that can hurt a home's value include yellow exteriors, brown dining rooms, and red kitchens (red in general is said to be an anxiety-inducing hue, so it's best to use it sparingly in homes). On the other hand, light blue bathrooms and light taupe living rooms are an asset.

If you're hoping to sell your home but don't plan to do so for another few years, it's best to hold off on repainting, if possible. Tastes in color schemes are constantly changing with the times—just two years ago, Zillow recommended yellow kitchens and purple dining rooms.

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IKEA
Syrian Refugees and Jordanian Women Created a New Line of Home Goods For IKEA
IKEA
IKEA

After debuting the Tilltalande Collection at its Amman, Jordan location last year, IKEA is finally bringing it to the U.S. As Curbed reports, every item in the collection was created by women from Jordan and refugees from Syria.

The new line is a collaboration between IKEA and the Jordan River Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to improving the lives of Jordanians, especially women and children. It includes a flatwoven rug and pillow covers decorated with elements like camels and blossoming cacti. Fifty Jordanian women artists and 50 Syrian refugees worked with IKEA to design the items and craft them by hand.

The Tilltalande Collection is the latest way IKEA is helping some of the millions of refugees forced from their homes by conflict. In 2015, the furniture company debuted its flatpack shelters, temporary homes that provide protection and electricity to displaced people around the world.

The new line of textiles will be sold at IKEA's Brooklyn location starting this June. If all goes as planned, the collection will provide employment to 400 people by 2020.

Pillow decorated with cactus.
IKEA

[h/t Curbed]

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