CLOSE

20 Cognitive Biases That Affect Your Decisions

You’ve always considered yourself a sound decision-maker. From that heavily researched car that you drove to work this morning to the carefully prepared meal you’ll cook up for dinner this evening, you put a lot of thought into every choice that you make—maybe too much thought. 

Business Insider recently sifted through a pile of research to create the infographic below, which highlights 20 of the most common cognitive biases that can lead to bad decision-making, including the idea that the more information you have, the more likely you are to make the smartest choice.

[h/t Business Insider]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
science
A Cold Nose Might Mean You're Working Too Hard, Researchers Say
iStock
iStock

A chilly office isn't necessarily the reason why your nose feels icy while you work. As The Telegraph reports, a study in the journal Human Factors suggests that when your brain is overloaded, blood flow gets diverted from your facial extremities to your neurons, resulting in a cold nose.

To examine how our bodies respond to heavy mental workloads, University of Nottingham researchers monitored 14 volunteers with thermal imaging cameras as they completed a computer game with varying stages of difficulty. The subjects periodically ranked how hard they were working using scales and questionnaires. The researchers also measured the group's heartbeats, breathing rates, and pupil dilation. (Four participants dropped out during the course of the study, and most of the subjects were men. The authors noted that their main limitation was the sample size.)

Results ranged among subjects, but researchers found that nose temp dropped about 1.8°F among subjects who indicated they felt overwhelmed. That, plus pupil diameter, were good overall predictors of intense cognitive performance. Scientists say this is because blood is being diverted to the brain, and it takes extra energy to pump blood to the nose.

As the study points out, both excessively high and low levels of mental demand can hurt job performance. They hope to use these techniques to monitor workers like airline pilots, whose intense workload can lead to unsafe flying conditions if not managed properly.

[h/t The Telegraph]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
7 Science-Backed Ways to Improve Your Memory
iStock
iStock

Being cursed with a bad memory can yield snafus big and small, from forgetting your gym locker combination to routinely blowing deadlines. If your New Year's resolution was to be less forgetful in 2018, it's time to start training your brain. The infographic below, created by financial website Quid Corner and spotted by Lifehacker Australia, lists seven easy ways to boost memory retention.

Different techniques can be applied to different scenarios, whether you're preparing for a speech or simply trying to recall someone's phone number. For example, if you're trying to learn a language, try writing down words and phrases, as this activates your brain into paying more attention. "Chunking," or separating long digit strings into shorter units, is a helpful hack for memorizing number sequences. And those with a poetic bent can translate information into rhymes, as this helps our brains break down and retain sound structures.

Learn more tips by checking out the infographic below.

[h/t Lifehacker.com.au]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios