Philipp Schmitt
Philipp Schmitt

This Camera Refuses to Take Pictures of Over-Photographed Locations

Philipp Schmitt
Philipp Schmitt

Every year, flocks of tourists travel to iconic destinations just to view them through a camera lens. Since the popularization of smartphones (and selfies), what were already the most overly photographed landmarks on earth are now more well-documented than ever. Camera Restricta seeks to reverse this trend by locking its shutter in heavily photographed locations.

Conceived by German designer Philipp Schmitt, the “camera" is made from a 3D-printed shell that encloses a smartphone. An app uses GPS to track your location and calculate how many online photos have been geotagged within a 115-foot radius. If too many photos have already been taken there, Camera Restricta refuses to function. It only allows you to start photographing again once you've moved to a less-documented area.

In an age when technology is increasingly anticipating our every want and need, a camera that dictates its own rules is a refreshing change. The digital interface displays your geographical coordinates, the number of pictures taken at your location, and whether or not you’re allowed to photograph there. Reminiscent of a Geiger counter, a small speaker emits electronic feedback that increases in intensity the closer you are to an over-photographed location.

Camera Restricta is meant to encourage photographers to seek out non-clichéd images, but it was also created as a commentary on political censorship. A proposal recently went up for vote in the European Parliament that would have restricted the photography of copyrighted buildings and artworks from public places. Though the measure was struck down, Camera Restricta explores an alternate world in which modern photography isn’t as easy as point and shoot.

You can download the open-source app from Camera Restricta’s project page.

[h/t: Fast Company]

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YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

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Mathew Tucciarone
Candytopia, the Interactive Art Installation Made of Sweet Treats, Is Coming to New York City
Mathew Tucciarone
Mathew Tucciarone

A colorful exhibition is sharing some eye candy—and actual candy—with visitors. The sweet art pop-up, called Candytopia, is heading to New York City this summer following successful stints in Los Angeles and Santa Monica, Gothamist reports.

Candytopia feels a little like Willy Wonka’s chocolate room. More than a dozen rooms with psychedelic backdrops will be on view, as well as candy-inspired interpretations of famous artworks such as Mona Lisa and The Thinker. The installation is the brainchild of Jackie Sorkin, the star of TLC’s Candy Queen.

Many of the art installations are made from actual candy, but unlike Wonka’s lickable wallpaper, visitors will have to keep their hands and tongues to themselves. Instead, guests will be given samples of various sweet treats like gummies, chocolates, and “nostalgic favorites.”

Forbes named Candytopia one of the best pop-up museums to visit in 2018. New York City seems the perfect place for the exhibit, having formerly hosted other food-inspired pop-ups like the Museum of Pizza and the Museum of Ice Cream.

Candytopia will debut in New York City on August 15 at Penn Plaza at 145 West 32nd Street. Tickets must be purchased in advance, and they can be ordered on Candytopia’s website. Private events and birthday parties can also be arranged.

Keep scrolling to see some more installations from Candytopia.

A wing of the Candytopia exhibit
Mathew Tucciarone

An Egyptian-inspired statue made of candy
Mathew Tucciarone

A candy version of the Mona Lisa
Mathew Tucciarone

A shark statue
Mathew Tucciarone

[h/t Gothamist]

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