CLOSE
REI
REI

8 Tips for Packing Your Car for a Camping Trip

REI
REI

Everyone has felt the frustration of struggling to pack a car—including Tad Summersett, Director of Product Strategy for Private Brands at outdoor retailer REI. “I’d find myself packing and unpacking multiple times before getting everything to fit. Or sweating and frustrated as I dug through layers of tightly packed gear just to find a flashlight to set up camp,” he tells mental_floss. So he decided to do something about it. Through “years of trial and error,” he developed a strategy he dubbed Precision Packing—and by following his tips below, you can quickly and painlessly load up a car, no matter what youre packing for. “Some of these are specific to camping, but most of these tips can be applied to all types of packing,” Summersett says. “Let my mistakes save you from the unnecessary frustration and waste of time.”  

1. DON’T JUST START THROWING THINGS IN THE TRUNK.

Summersett advises laying out all the items near your car—including things that were already in your car—and assessing what you have to fit in there. And make sure that everyone has put out everything they’re planning to bring before you start packing. “Adding just one forgotten item mid-way through the job can mean starting all over, Summersett says. Once you have everything laid out in front of you, assess what all needs to fit. Then start playing Tetris—so to speak—taking into account any of your individual needs throughout the trip and upon arrival. The more you do it, the more efficient your packing becomes.”

2. START WITH A GOOD FOUNDATION ...

As with many projects, the key to packing your car is to start with a strong foundation. “Place your heavier or larger items with flat sides—like a camping cooler or camp stove, or heavier boxes when moving—and build up,” Summerset says.

3. … AND LEAVE SOME HOLES AS YOU BUILD.

It sounds counterintuitive, but leave holes and gaps as you’re packing, which you can later fill with stuff you might need along the way—like camping chairs for a roadside picnic—which youll then be able to easily slide out.

4. POSITION BAGS JUST RIGHT.

You want to make sure everything is easily accessible so you can get into everything without having to fully unload. Summersett advises doing things like turning bags so you can get to the zippers and putting lighting on the top just in case you arrive at the campsite at night.

5. UNROLL THOSE SLEEPING PADS.

Not only will unrolling your sleeping pads give you more flexibility when you’re packing, but you can also put them to work: “They can be used to hold things together,” Summersett says.

6. STRATEGICALLY PLACE THE HEAVY STUFF.

Any heavy or hard objects should be placed “below the highest point of your rear seat to prevent items from banging into your head given a sharp turn or sudden stop,” Summersett says.

7. THINK ABOUT WHERE YOU’RE GOING, WHEN YOU’LL ARRIVE, AND WHAT YOU’LL NEED WHEN YOU GET THERE.

“If you’re arriving at dinnertime, have your camp kitchen readily accessible,” Summersett says. “If you’re arriving after dark, be sure to strategically place your lighting. Aside from those key items, stick to the foundation method with heavier items on the bottom and you’ll set yourself up for success.”

8. WHEN YOU’RE DONE, SNAP A PHOTO.

It will make it much easier to recreate what you’ve done for the trip home. Now hit the road!

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
technology
Wisconsin Considers Building a Highway Lane for Self-Driving Cars
iStock

Self-driving cars are already a reality, as companies like Google and Tesla have demonstrated. But the logistics of getting them on the roads with human-operated cars have slowed down their long-anticipated takeover. In Wisconsin, highway planners are looking into one way to accommodate autonomous vehicles when they arrive. Dedicated lanes for driverless cars are being considered for I-94, USA Today’s Journal Sentinel reports.

The project is supported by Foxconn, the Taiwanese tech supplier building a new facility 20 miles outside of downtown Milwaukee. Once the site is complete, it will cover 20 million square feet and employ up to 13,000 people. According to the company, setting aside space for self-driving vehicles could ease traffic congestion, both from new workers and cargo trucks, after the factory opens.

Officials were already planning to expand I-94 from six lanes to eight to accommodate the eventual increase in traffic, but Foxconn says that may not be enough. “We’re thinking about two years down the road; they’re thinking 20 years down the road,” Tim Sheehy, president of the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce, said at a meeting of the Greater Milwaukee Committee.

While Sheehy said the autonomous car lane proposal is “on the table,” he didn’t make any promises regarding the plan’s future. Wisconsin isn’t the only state looking ahead to new developments in road travel: In October, tech investors pitched an idea to Washington state officials to convert Interstate 5 into a corridor for autonomous vehicles between Seattle and Vancouver.

[h/t Journal Sentinel]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Ford
arrow
technology
Ford Tests Exoskeletons That Make Overhead Tasks Easier for Workers
Ford

Engineers have already developed exoskeletons capable of supporting elderly people and helping paralyzed people walk. But the technology offers benefits to able-bodied wearers as well. That's what employees are learning at Ford's U.S. factories. As Road Show reports, workers there are suiting up in upper body exoskeletons designed to alleviate fatigue and decrease their chance of injury.

Assembling car parts requires workers to reach their arms above their heads thousands of times a day. While most healthy individuals would have no problem doing this type of work for a few minutes at a time, the rate at which these employees are completing the tasks puts an enormous strain on their bodies. This can lead to back and shoulder fatigue, soreness, and even injury.

In an effort to make their workforce more comfortable and productive, Ford has been testing the EksoVest from Ekso Bionics in two of its American auto plants. The non-powered suits fit people between 5 feet and 6 feet 4 inches tall. The lightweight design provides up to 15 pounds of support to each arm without weighing wearers down or restricting their movements. According to Ford, the pilot program has contributed to an 83 percent drop in the number of incidents that led to time off between 2005 and 2016. And on top of staying healthy enough to go to work, employees have reported feeling more energized during their off hours.

The EksoVest has already helped workers launch several new vehicles, including the 2018 Ford Mustang and the 2018 Lincoln Navigator. Following the trial program's success, the automobile company next plans to test the technology in factories in Europe and South America.

[h/t Road Show]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios