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8 Spicy Things You Didn’t Know About Popeyes

We all know Popeyes for their Louisiana-style Cajun chicken, but the story behind the brand is even spicier. 

1. POPEYES' ORIGINAL NAME WAS 'CHICKEN ON THE RUN.'

Founder Al Copeland opened his first chicken joint, Chicken on the Run, in the New Orleans suburb of Arabi, La. in 1972. Initially, he was serving mildly spicy chicken but quickly realized it needed a fiery kick to attract Louisiana taste buds. The original slogan for Chicken on the Run was “So fast, you get your chicken before you get your change”—a precursor to Popeyes current, more straight-forward slogan, "Louisiana Fast."

2. POPEYES WASN'T NAMED AFTER THE SAILOR MAN—SO THEY SAY.

Although Copeland claimed he named the chicken chain after Jimmy “Popeye” Doyle, the detective from the 1971 movie The French Connection, Popeye the Sailor Man was very involved with their marketing. Popeyes sponsored the Popeye and Pals children's show in New Orleans, and the macho caricature appeared on items from packaging to Copeland’s racing boats. It was only recently, in November 2006, when Popeyes franchisor AFC announced the termination of their licensing contract with the Popeye and Pals owner, that the longstanding association with the Popeye character ended.

3. POPEYES' OWNER WAS A BALLER, BUT HE COULDN'T AFFORD AN APOSTROPHE.

Al Copeland grew up as the youngest of three children to a single mother in a household where money was always tight. He dropped out of high school at 16 and took a job at his brother’s partially owned donut chain, Tastee Donut, which exposed him to the restaurant business and the concept of franchising. Later in life, Copeland would own multiple restaurant chains, comedy clubs, and hotels, but the memory of growing up on welfare and living in housing projects never left him. He lived ostentatiously, flaunting his racing boats, driving Rolls-Royces around New Orleans, and having four lavish weddings (at least one of which had heart-shaped fireworks). But despite his wealth, Copeland could always find the humor in his previous financial situation—he often claimed that he was "too poor" to afford an apostrophe for the restaurant's name.

4. AL COPELAND LOVED CHRISTMAS WITH A PASSION.

Copeland was well-known for going full-on Clark Griswold with his annual Christmas lights display. Every year, families from around New Orleans would gather to see his array of elaborate lights, foreign cars, and partake in free popcorn, candy, and children’s toys. His extravagantly decorated yard was even featured as a top-three Christmas display on the Today show in 2003. But it wasn't all blinking lights and reindeer—Copeland was also known as a "Secret Santa," someone who would quietly fund gifts for underprivileged children each year.

5. POPEYES DIDN'T ALWAYS OWN THEIR SEASONING.

Most people have heard of music royalties, but spice royalties? Perhaps not. Due to a bankruptcy reorganization in the early '90s, Copeland was forced to step down as chief executive of Popeyes, but he maintained ownership of food manufacturer Diversified Foods and Seasonings, a company he started in 1984 which provided various batters, biscuits, gravies, sauces, etc. to the franchises. DFS owned the rights to several of the classic Popeyes recipes, so for 23 years the chicken chain paid DFS a $3.1 million “spice royalty” fee to legally use the recipes. In 2014, Popeyes came to a $43 million agreement with DFS, effectively buying back their own product.

6. THE POPEYES SPOKESWOMAN'S NAME IS ANNIE.

The aunt-like figure with the sweet, hospitable Louisiana twang in Popeyes' commercials is named Annie. She's a fictional character, played by actress Deidrie Henry, who was first brought out in 2009 in order to push the heritage of Louisiana southern home cooking. (Sorry folks, there's no real Auntie Annie coming up with new po' boy recipes in the back.)

7. BEYONCE HAS A LIFETIME SUPPLY OF POPEYES CHICKEN.

Popeyes has many celebrity fans, spanning from baseball great Hank Aaron to Kylie Jenner. But perhaps their most notable fan is Beyoncé. In 2003 she told Oprah that the chain had heard about how much she loved their food and gave her a free-Popeyes-for-life card. And, rumor has it that she even had Popeyes chicken at her wedding to Jay Z (a story the chain has no problem referencing, whether factual or not).

8. THE POPEYES JINGLE HAS BEEN SUNG BY LOCAL LEGENDS.

Popeyes has some major music cred in terms of who has sung in their ads. Two of the most notable New Orleans musicians—NOLA funk and R&B grandmaster Dr. John and early rock great Fats Domino—have both been showcased in commercials. Dr. John growled the catchy "Love that chicken from Popeyes" line in the '80s, and Domino contributed to their New Year's campaign in late 1987. Local zydeco band Rockin' Dopsie Jr. and the Zydeco Twisters have also contributed, and all these spokes-singers were on hand for the Popeyes 30th anniversary party in 2002. As they say on the bayou, that'd make a great gumbo ya-ya.

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Live Smarter
The Only Way to Answer ‘What Is Your Greatest Weakness?’ In a Job Interview
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Thanks in part to the influence of Silicon Valley and its focus on the psychological probing of job applicants, interview questions have been steadily getting more and more abstract. As part of the interview process, today's job seekers might be asked to describe a vending machine to someone who’s never seen one before, or plan a fantasy date with a famous historical figure.

Even if the company you’re approaching isn’t fully on board with prodding your brain, at some point you may still come up against one of the most common queries applicants face: "What is your greatest weakness?"

"Some 'experts' will tell you to try and turn a strength into a 'weakness,' to make yourself look good," writes Inc. contributor Justin Bariso. "That advice is garbage."

"Think about it," Bariso continues. "Interviewers are asking the same question to countless candidates. Just try and guess how many times they hear the answers 'being a perfectionist' or 'working too much.' (Hint: way too often.)"

While responding that you work too hard might seem like a reliable method of moving the conversation along, there’s a better way. And it involves being sincere.

"The fact is, it's not easy to identify one's own weaknesses," Bariso writes. "Doing so takes intense self-reflection, critical thinking, and the ability to accept negative feedback—qualities that have gone severely missing in a world that promotes instant gratification and demands quick (often thoughtless) replies to serious issues."

Bariso believes the question is an effective way to reveal an applicant’s self-awareness, which is why companies often use it in their vetting process. By being self-aware, people (and employees) can correct behavior that might be affecting job performance. So the key is to give this question some actual thought before it’s ever posed to you.

What is your actual greatest weakness? It could be that, in a desire to please everyone, you wind up making decisions based on the urge to avoid disappointing others. That’s a weakness that sounds authentic.

Pondering the question also has another benefit: It prompts you to think of areas in your life that could use some course-correcting. Even if you don’t land that job—or even if the question is never posed to you—you’ve still made time for self-reflection. The result could mean a more confident and capable presence for that next interview.

[h/t Inc.]

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Words
This Is the Most Commonly Misspelled Word on Job Resumes
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by Reader's Digest Editors

Your resume is your first chance to make a good impression with hiring managers. One misspelled word might not seem like a huge deal, but it can mean the difference between looking competent and appearing lazy. A 2014 Accountemps survey of 300 senior managers found that 63 percent of employers would reject a job candidate who had just one or two typos on their resume.

Most misspellings on resumes slip through the cracks because spellcheck doesn’t catch them. The most common misspelling on resumes is a shockingly simple word—or so you’d think.

Career coach and resume writer Jared Redick of Resume Studio in San Francisco tells Business Insider that the most common misspelling he sees by far is confusing “lead” with “led.” If you’re talking about how you run meetings at your current job, the correct spelling is “lead,” which is in the present tense. If the bullet point is from a former position, use lead’s past tense: led. Yes, “lead” as in the metal can also be pronounced “led,” but most people have no need to discuss chemical elements on their job resumes.

 
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Other spelling mistakes Redick has seen pop up over and over again on resumes is spelling “definitely” as “definately” (which spellcheck thankfully should catch) and adding an e in “judgment” (“judgement” is the British spelling, but “judgment” is preferred in American English).

To avoid the cringe factor of noticing little typos after sending out your application—especially if your misspelling actually is a real word that spellcheck recognizes—always proofread your resume before submitting. Slowly reading it out loud will take just a few minutes, but it could mean the difference between an interview and a rejection.

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