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Party at the White House! The Time the Roosevelts Threw a Toga Party

Becoming President of the United States of America comes with a certain set of expectations regarding decorum and diplomacy. But if history has taught us anything, it’s that the 44 men who’ve held the position knew how to party—and how to handle their haters.

Despite his public health struggles, Franklin D. Roosevelt was no exception on either count. While in office, the Democrat regularly entertained guests over cocktails, smoked, and threw an annual birthday bash to reunite with his campaign staff and close advisors, known affectionately as the “Cuff Links Gang.”

In 1934—only a year into his presidency—Roosevelt was under scrutiny from conservatives who called him a “dictator.” The president and first lady, Eleanor, responded by turning FDR’s 52nd birthday party into a “Caesarian” themed bash (what a non-head of state might call a toga party).

That year, on January 30, the White House hosted past and present staff, as well as friends, who all dressed to the nines in accordance with the cheeky theme. FDR played Caesar, Eleanor was the Delphic Oracle, and Louis Howe, longtime adviser, dressed as a Praetorian Guard. Marion Dickerman, a suffragette and friend of Eleanor’s, wore a muslin toga garment that is now at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum.

It looked like quite the affair.

 

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A New Roller Coaster is Whizzing Through Colorado's Rocky Mountains
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There are plenty of ways to explore the majestic Rocky Mountains, but few offer the adrenaline rush of the Rocky Mountain Coaster, a brand-new roller coaster that sends riders soaring along the range’s natural twists and turns.

As Urban Daddy reports, the Rocky Mountain Coaster recently opened at Copper Mountain, a mountain and ski resort that’s located near the tiny town of Frisco, about 75 miles west of Denver. Nestled in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, the vacation spot is ideal for hikers, skiers, and mountain bikers. Now, visitors looking to enjoy the surrounding scenery without breaking a sweat can cruise for roughly a mile down to the resort’s high alpine Center Village.

The ride’s raised track “runs along the natural curvature of the mountain, with zigs, zags, dips, and 360-degree turns for guaranteed thrills,” according to a press release. Each personal car is equipped with manual hand brakes to control the ride’s pace, but the coaster does feature a 430-foot drop, so be careful with your phones while Instagramming the view.

The Rocky Mountain Coaster is open-year round, though it will initially mostly only be open on weekends. Solo rides cost $25, and a two-ride pass can be purchased for $35. (Resort guests get an exclusive discount.)

[h/t Urban Daddy]

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Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
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Pop Culture
How to Perform the Star Wars Theme—On Calculators
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The iconic Star Wars theme has been recreated with glass harps, theremins, and even cat meows. Now, Laughing Squid reports that the team over at YouTube channel It’s a small world have created a version that can be played on calculators.

The channel’s math-related music videos feature covers of popular songs like Luis Fonsi’s "Despacito," Ed Sheeran’s "Shape of You," and the Pirates of the Caribbean theme, all of which are performed on two or more calculators. The Star Wars theme, though, is played across five devices, positioned together into a makeshift keyboard of sorts.

The video begins with a math-musician who transcribes number combinations into notes. Then, they break into an elaborate practice chord sequence on two, and then four, calculators. Once they’re all warmed up, they begin playing the epic opening song we all know and love, which you can hear for yourself in all its electronic glory below.

[h/t Laughing Squid]

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