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Party at the White House! The Time the Roosevelts Threw a Toga Party

Becoming President of the United States of America comes with a certain set of expectations regarding decorum and diplomacy. But if history has taught us anything, it’s that the 44 men who’ve held the position knew how to party—and how to handle their haters.

Despite his public health struggles, Franklin D. Roosevelt was no exception on either count. While in office, the Democrat regularly entertained guests over cocktails, smoked, and threw an annual birthday bash to reunite with his campaign staff and close advisors, known affectionately as the “Cuff Links Gang.”

In 1934—only a year into his presidency—Roosevelt was under scrutiny from conservatives who called him a “dictator.” The president and first lady, Eleanor, responded by turning FDR’s 52nd birthday party into a “Caesarian” themed bash (what a non-head of state might call a toga party).

That year, on January 30, the White House hosted past and present staff, as well as friends, who all dressed to the nines in accordance with the cheeky theme. FDR played Caesar, Eleanor was the Delphic Oracle, and Louis Howe, longtime adviser, dressed as a Praetorian Guard. Marion Dickerman, a suffragette and friend of Eleanor’s, wore a muslin toga garment that is now at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum.

It looked like quite the affair.

 

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fun
Here's How to Turn an IKEA Box Into a Spaceship
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Since IKEA boxes are designed to contain entire furniture items, they could probably fit a small child once they’re emptied of any flat-packed component pieces. This means they have great potential as makeshift forts—or even as play spaceships, according to one of the Swedish furniture brand’s print ads, which was spotted by Design Taxi.

First highlighted by Ads of the World, the advertisement—which was created by Miami Ad School, New York—shows that IKEA is helping customers transform used boxes into build-it-yourself “SPÄCE SHIPS” for children. The company provides play kits, which come with both an instruction manual and cardboard "tools" for tiny builders to wield during the construction process.

As for the furniture boxes themselves, they're emblazoned with the words “You see a box, they see a spaceship." As if you won't be climbing into the completed product along with the kids …

Check out the ad below:

[h/t Design Taxi]

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Food
The Best Cupcake in All 50 States
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We’re going to sugarcoat it. Twelve years after the advent of the cupcake-only bakery (the California-launched chain Sprinkles is credited with opening the first in 2005), there are a lot of options. We rounded up 50 of the best decadent desserts across the country. So go out, have your (cup)cake—and eat it, too.

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