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Wearing Black Makes You Look Sexy, Smart, and Confident, Poll Confirms

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Call off the search for whatever color is “the new black.” A consumer poll commissioned by a UK-based t-shirt wholesaler has determined which shades reign supreme when you want your outfit to do the talking, and despite its funereal overtones, classic black comes out on top.

Skeptics might cry, “It’s not what you wear; it’s how you wear it!” True enough, which is why respondents were asked about which color most inspires confidence, that quality most essential to successful self-presentation. An overwhelming majority of both men and women claimed they felt best in black, and it's no small wonder why—two-thirds of women prefer their men in black, and it’s just a short leap to assume that men feel confident when they can sense female attention. (No word yet on same-gender opinions of first-date attire, so there’s study fodder for another day.)

Which color most inspires confidence?

Blue takes after black in the rankings for attractiveness, scoring better with poll respondents than any other shade. Men cite it as one of their top choices to wear on a first date, and women agree that they like a man in blue—that is, if a man in black isn’t available.

There are those who prefer to dress to convey their intelligence rather than their self-esteem, and there’s a color for that, too: black. Once again, respondents of both genders were very clear that black, followed by blue, most connotes intellectual depth. Imagine Sartre wearing canary yellow or Proust in blush pink, and the association of somber colors with serious thought becomes clear.

There are plenty of upsides to dressing like Johnny Cash, though a few downsides stood out. Black was rated low for generosity (Ebenezer Scrooge would wear a black waistcoat, wouldn’t he?), but low for arrogance, which seems like a fair enough trade.

As far as colors to avoid, the results are just as clear. Brown and orange are suitable for chocolate and traffic cones, but not people, and pink is best left to Barbie. For almost all other people and occasions, black is safest and best. Best of all. it will never go out of style.

[h/t Mic]

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fun
These Super Realistic Ski Masks Let Your Inner Animal Come Out
Beardo
Beardo

No matter how serious you are about your skiing performance, it doesn't hurt to have a sense of humor on the slopes. These convincing animal masks spotted by My Modern Met make it easy to have fun while tearing up the trails.

Each animal mask from the Canadian apparel company Beardo is printed with a photorealistic design of a different animal's face. Skiers can disguise themselves as a bear, dog, fox, orangutan, or even a grumpy-ish cat while keeping their skin warm. The only part of the face that stays exposed is around the eyes, but a pair of ski goggles allows wearers to disappear completely into their beastly persona.

The playful gear is practical as well. The stretchy polyester material is built to shield skin from wind and UV rays, while the soft fleece lining keeps faces feeling toasty.

Beardo's animal ski masks are available through their online store for $35. If you like to stay cozy in style, here are more products to keep you warm this winter.

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

[h/t My Modern Met]

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Learn to Tie a Tie in Less Than 2 Minutes
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For most men—and Avril Lavigne-imitators—learning to tie a tie is an essential sartorial skill. Digg spotted this video showing how you can tie one the simple way, with a tabletop method that works just as well if you’re going to wear the tie yourself or if you're tying it together for someone else who doesn't share your skills.

The whole technique is definitely easier to master while watching the video below, but here's a short rundown: As laid out by the lifehack YouTube channel DaveHax, the method requires you to lay the tie out on a table, folded in half as if you're about to loop it around your neck.

With the back of the tie facing up, you loop over each end, then twist the thinner of the two loops around itself so it ends up looking like a mini-tie knot itself. You'll end up nestling the two loops together and snaking the thin tail of the tie through the whole thing. Then, essentially all you have to do is pull, and you can adjust the tie as you otherwise would to put it over your head.

Unfortunately, this won't teach you how to master the art of more complicated neckwear styles like the fancier Balthus knot or even a bow tie, but it's a pretty good start for those who have yet to figure out even the simplest tie fashions.

[h/t Digg]

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