16 Grilled-to-Order Facts About Shake Shack

Scott Olson, Getty Images
Scott Olson, Getty Images

What began as a hot dog stand in New York’s Madison Square Park (yes, a hot dog stand) has exploded into a burger empire with locations across the globe. Shake Shack, the brainchild of restaurateur Danny Meyer, has discovered a sweet spot with fast-food-weary customers, and spawned numerous imitators along the way. Here, we take a look at the company’s beginnings, where it’s headed, and whether peanut butter ShackBurgers are really a thing.

1. IT STARTED AS PART OF AN ART INSTALLATION.

Image of the original Shake Shack location in Madison Square Park
iStock

Back in summer 2001, an art show called “I  Taxi” took over Madison Square Park. In addition to all sorts of taxi-themed displays, there was a hot dog stand that quickly became a hit for its friendly service and Chicago-style dogs. Little did patrons know, it was actually run by restaurateur Danny Meyer (who headed up the Madison Square Park Conservancy) and staffed by off-season coat-check workers from his upscale restaurants. The operation lost money over the three summers it was in business, but Meyer was encouraged by the turnout. So he asked the Parks Department for a full-time business permit, pledging to donate some of the earnings to the park’s development, and they obliged. In 2004, Shake Shack opened, and notoriously long lines ensued.

2. IT GOT ITS NAME FROM THE MOVIE GREASE...

Screencap of Sandy and Danny dancing on the Shake Shack ride from the 1978 movie Grease
Paramount Pictures

Meyer told Fortune he must have come up with the name after watching Grease so many times. In the final scene, Sandy and Danny dance on an amusement park ride called the “Shake Shack” while singing “You’re the One That I Want.”

3. BUT IT WAS ALMOST CALLED "CUSTARD'S FIRST STAND."

Image of restaurateur Danny Meyer smiling proudly in front of computer screens bearing the Shake Shack logo
Spencer Platt, Getty Images

Meyer acknowledged in a 2015 interview with the New York Times that the name was “pretty bad.”

4. ITS INSPIRATION IS DISTINCTLY MIDWESTERN.

Image of crinkle cut fries fresh out of the deep fryer
iStock

The St. Louis-raised Meyer had a fondness for the burger joints and frozen custard stands he grew up with—places like Ted Drewes, Steak 'n Shake, and Fitz’s. So when the time came to develop the concept for Shake Shack, he reached back to the crinkle fries and chocolate malts of his childhood.

5. MEYER DREW UP THE MENU IN LESS THAN 10 MINUTES.

Image of Shake Shack sign
Jim Watson, Getty Images

In an interview with Bon Appetit, Meyer said he wrote down the original Shake Shack menu on a napkin in exactly nine minutes. And it proved to be eerily on-target, outlining many of today’s Shake Shack standards. The current CEO, Randy Garruti, has the menu framed in his office.

6. IT OFFERS CONCRETES CUSTOMIZED BY LOCATION.

So this is technically just an image of a scoop of vanilla custard and not a concrete, but I did my best with what I had access to. So admire this plain vanilla scoop in a small bowl.
Monica Schipper, Getty Images

Florida locations feature concretes made with key lime tarts from Palm Beach’s Sugar Monkey bakery, while Philadelphia Shake Shacks offer one made with strawberry puree, lemon ricotta, and crushed up cannoli shells from Termini Brothers bakery. At the company’s Baltimore location, there’s a custard concrete made using blueberry pancake pie from local baker Dangerously Delicious.

7. IT TOOK THE RESTAURANT EIGHT YEARS TO ADD BACON.

Image of bacon sizzling on a grill
iStock

This would seem like a no-brainer, but Shake Shack, which relies on a meticulous culinary development manager named Mark Rosati to approve new additions, isn’t afraid to take its time. Nowadays, you can get a SmokeShack, or add bacon to any burger.

8. IT'S VERY PICKY ABOUT ITS HAMBURGER MEAT.

Image of a worker shaping raw hamburger patties
iStock

It’s a custom blend of brisket, chuck, skirt steak and short rib made for the company by Pat LaFrieda. Only a few executives know the exact recipe. According to LaFrieda, back in its early days Shake Shack sampled 20 different ground beef combinations before selecting the one they currently use.

9. IT SERVES BREAKFAST, BUT ONLY AT FIVE LOCATIONS.

Shake Shack location at Grand Central Station in New York City
iStock

That would be the two locations inside New York's JFK Airport’s Terminal 4, the Shake Shack inside New York’s Grand Central Terminal, Washington D.C.’s Union Station location, and, most recently, the original Madison Square Park location. The menu is small, but who doesn't want a breakfast sandwich to help them power through that red-eye?

10. IT'S HAD SOME DELICIOUS SOUNDING MENU FLOPS.

Image of heirloom tomatoes
iStock

Like the heirloom tomato custard, or the float made with chocolate custard and stout. There was also a jalapeno and cheddar sausage, which was apparently delightful but had the unfortunate side effect of squirting hot cheese in your face. Whatever: worth it.

11. YOU CAN ORDER A PEANUT BUTTER BACON SHACKBURGER.

Image of peanut butter in a bowl with some whole peanuts artfully tossed around the bowl
iStock

The gooey, meaty concoction ran as a menu item for a short time back in 2010. Apparently it flopped, and Meyer has said there’s no chance of bringing it back (“I draw the line at peanut butter,” he told Bon Appetit). But menu hackers have discovered it exists as a secret menu item, and uses peanut butter mix-in for the shakes.

12. IT OFFERS CORN DOGS THREE TIMES A YEAR.

Image of a corn dog sitting atop some crinkle-cut fries
iStock

They’re all-beef Vienna hot dogs dipped in house-made corn batter and served with sweet relish. And they’re only available on Memorial Day, July 4th and Labor Day.

13. A SHRIMP PATTY BURGER SPARKED ITS LONGEST LINE EVER.

Image of Madison Square Park Shake Shack location at night
iStock

The line at Shake Shack’s original Madison Square Park location is long most days (you can check ahead using the nifty line cam). But on June 10th of 2014, it was egregiously long—so long, in fact, that it wound through the whole park. The reason: A limited-release David Chang “Momofuku Shrimp Stack” burger that married beef and shrimp patties and was topped with Momofuku Hozon sauce. Demand outstripped the supply of 1,000 burgers, and Shake Shack took to Twitter to apologize.

14. IT'S HUGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

Image of a double stack Shake Shake cheeseburger
iStock

Shake Shack has ventured abroad to countries like England, Turkey and Russia. But its most significant international investment has been in the Middle East, with 20 restaurants in states and countries like Kuwait, Lebanon and the United Arab Emirates. Locals love the stuff, apparently, but there have been supply issues.

15. IT HAS A SECRET MENU.

Image of root beer floats
iStock

Menu spotlights include a grilled cheese sandwich made with the restaurant’s famous potato buns, a protein-style burger wrapped in lettuce, and a root beer float.

16. IT HAS ITS OWN RUNNING CLUB.

Image of people running
iStock

Shack Track and Field is a free community fitness club located at Shake Shacks across the country. The running club hosts community runs on the second Tuesday of every month, the restaurant’s website says.

General Mills Is Recalling More Than 600,000 Pounds of Gold Medal Flour Over E. Coli Risk

jirkaejc/iStock via Getty Images
jirkaejc/iStock via Getty Images

The FDA recently shared news of a 2019 product recall that could impact home bakers. As CNN reports, General Mills is voluntarily recalling 600,000 pounds of its Gold Medal Unbleached All-Purpose Flour due to a possible E. coli contamination.

The decision to pull the flour from shelves was made after a routine test of the 5-pound bags. According to a company statement, "the potential presence of E. coli O26" was found in the sample, and even though no illnesses have been connected to Gold Medal flour, General Mills is recalling it to be safe.

Escherichia coli O26 is a dangerous strain of the E. coli bacterium that's often spread through commercially processed foods. Symptoms include abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Most patients recover within a week, but in people with vulnerable immune systems like young children and seniors, the complications can be deadly.

To avoid the potentially contaminated batch, look for Gold Medal flour bags with a "better if used by" date of September 6, 2020 and the package UPC 016000 196100. All other products sold under the Gold Medal label are safe to consume.

Whether or not the flour in your pantry is affected, the recall is a good reminder that consuming raw flour can be just as harmful as eating raw eggs. So when you're baking cookies, resist having a taste until after they come out of the oven—or indulge in one of the many edible cookie dough products on the market instead.

[h/t CNN]

The World's Spiciest Chip Is Sold Only One to a Customer

Paqui
Paqui

If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to get pepper-sprayed directly in your mouth, Paqui Chips has something you can’t afford to miss. Following the success of their Carolina Reaper Madness One Chip Challenges back in 2016 and 2017, Food & Wine reports that the company has re-released the sadistic snack. Continuing their part-marketing gimmick, part-public safety effort, the Reaper chip won’t be sold in bags. You just get one chip.

That’s because Paqui dusts its chips with the Carolina Reaper Pepper, considered the world’s hottest, and most (attempted) consumers of the chip report being unable to finish even one. To drive home the point of how hot this chip is—it’s really, extremely, punishingly hot—the chip is sold in a tiny coffin-shaped box

Peppers like the Carolina Reaper are loaded with capsaicin, a compound that triggers messages of heat and pain and fiery consumption; your body can respond by vomiting or having shortness of breath. While eating the chip is not the same as consuming the bare, whole pepper, it’s still going to be a very uncomfortable experience. For a profanity-filled example, you can check out this video:

The chip will be sold only on Paqui’s website for $6.99 per chip or $59.90 for a 10-pack. The company also encourages pepper aficionados to upload photos or video of their attempts to finish the chip. If it becomes too much, try eating yogurt, honey, or milk to dampen the effects.

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