8 Crafty Ways to Make Your Hotel Room Feel Like Home

iStock
iStock

After a long day spent exploring a new place, nothing feels nicer than coming home to a spacious, comfortable hotel room. But that’s hardly the case for travelers on a budget, who instead get stuck with small bathrooms, thin walls, and old mattresses. For those times you’re not lodging in luxury, a little preparation is all it takes to transform your hotel room into a cozy haven. 

1. LIGHT A CANDLE.

It's hard to get comfortable in a place that still smells like the last people who slept there. Consider picking up a scented candle that reminds you of home to personalize your otherwise bland room. Just make sure to check with the front desk before lighting it, and be careful not to set off any smoke alarms when blowing it out.

2. PACK YOUR OWN COFFEE. 

Even hotels with bare-bones amenities understand that caffeine is a basic human right. Instead of brewing the generic, individually packaged stuff provided by the hotel, pack your favorite blend in a plastic baggie. The familiar scent of your go-to coffee will make waking up in a strange place a little more tolerable. 

3. STREAM YOUR FAVORITE SHOWS.

When staying at a hotel, pass on the pay-per-view and instead take advantage of the streaming services you're already paying for. If your room's television has an HDMI port, all you need is an HDMI cable or a cordless media streamer to set yourself up for a night of binge-watching—without the surprise bill the next morning.

4. BYOB (BRING YOUR OWN BLANKET)

Hotel bedding is often bulky, starchy, and tucked too tightly—and that's a best-case scenario. Forego the provided comforter and pack some of your favorite items from home for an easier night's sleep: Your favorite pillow and your softest blanket can make all the difference. And if you only have room for a single stuffed animal, we won't judge. 

5. THINK AHEAD BY BRINGING A POWER STRIP.

The bane of every modern traveler's existence is finding places to plug in all their devices. Instead of performing impromptu feng shui to utilize every available outlet in your room, simplify your life by picking up a power strip. No one should have to choose between charging their phone and keeping it by their bed.

6. KEEP YOUR FAVORITE DRINK ON HAND.

When returning to your hotel room after an exhausting day, nothing sounds better than relaxing with your favorite nightcap. This is the same reason why so many hotel guests succumb to high mini bar prices. If you pick up your preferred drink beforehand, that $14 mini bottle of vodka won't seem as tempting.

7. INVEST IN A WI-FI BASE.

This is a smart move for frequent travelers who end up paying hotel Wi-Fi fees on a regular basis. With a portable Wi-Fi base of your own you will no longer be at the mercy of unfair charges and elusive passwords. A life of guaranteed free Wi-Fi is definitely one worth living. 

8. ASK FOR DISHES. 

Most hotels are more than willing to provide dishes to guests who ask for them. This is a smart way to encourage yourself to eat the leftovers waiting in your mini-fridge instead of going out. It might even trick you into feeling like you're eating a home-cooked meal. 

A Finnish Tourism Company Is Hiring Professional Christmas Elves

iStock.com/kali9
iStock.com/kali9

Finland isn't quite the North Pole, but it will be home to a team of gainfully employed Christmas elves this holiday season. As Travel + Leisure reports, the Scandinavian country's Lapland Safaris is looking for elves to get guests into the holiday spirit.

Lapland Safaris is a tourism company that organizes activities like snowmobiling, Northern Lights-gazing, skiing, and ice-fishing. The elf employees will be responsible for leading guests to their buses and conveying important information, all while spreading holiday cheer. The job listing reads, "An Elf is at the same time an entertainer, a guide, and a mythical creature of Christmas."

Each Lapland Safari elf will receive training through Arctic Hospitality Academy prior to starting the job. There, they will learn "the required elfing and communication skills." Training will be conducted in English, but candidates' knowledge of French, Spanish, or German is a plus.

To apply, aspiring elves can fill out and submit this form through Lapland Safaris's website. The gig lasts from November 2018 to the beginning of next year, with employees having the option to work at any of the company's Finnish destinations (Santa's workshop is unfortunately not included on the list).

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

The Truth Behind Italy's Abandoned 'Ghost Mansion'

YouTube/Atlas Obscura
YouTube/Atlas Obscura

The forests east of Lake Como, Italy, are home to a foreboding ruin. Some call it the Casa Delle Streghe (House of Witches), or the Red House, after the patches of rust-colored paint that still coat parts of the exterior. Its most common nickname, however, is the Ghost Mansion.

Since its construction in the 1850s, the mansion—officially known as the Villa De Vecchi—has reportedly been the site of a string of tragedies, including the murder of the family of the Italian count who built it, as well as the count's suicide. It's also said that everyone's favorite occultist, Aleister Crowley, visited in the 1920s, leading to a succession of satanic rituals and orgies. By the 1960s, the mansion was abandoned, and since then both nature and vandals have helped the house fall into dangerous decay. The only permanent residents are said to be a small army of ghosts, who especially love to play the mansion's piano at night—even though it's long since been smashed to bits.

The intrepid explorers of Atlas Obscura recently visited the mansion and interviewed Giuseppe Negri, whose grandfather and great-grandfather were gardeners there. See what he thinks of the legends, and the reality behind the mansion, in the video below.

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