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Mike Mozart via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Mike Mozart via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

10 Handy Uses for Dryer Sheets

Mike Mozart via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Mike Mozart via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Dryer sheets aren't just for laundry. The thin, anti-static sheets have a host of other uses outside the laundry basket. Here are 10 other ways you can use them. 

1. MAKE YOUR DIRTY LAUNDRY SMELL CLEAN.

Don’t save your dryer sheets for the clean laundry pile. They can also keep piles of dirty laundry from stinking up the room. Throw in a sheet as an odor absorber to tide you over until laundry day. When traveling, toss one in your suitcase, too. 

2. TAKE THE STATIC OUT OF YOUR HAIR. 

Dryer sheets help tamp down static in your laundry—and your hair. Just wipe one through your silky strands and static disappears. If you don’t want your hair to smell like fresh laundry, you can spring for a slightly-more-expensive variety that’s actually designed for head use.

3. EMPTY THE LINT TRAP. 

Lint trapped in clothes dryers causes thousands of fires every year. After you take your laundry out, give your lint trap a swipe using the used dryer sheet to catch all the trapped debris. 

4. CLEAN COMPUTER SCREENS.

Dryer sheets provide a soft surface to wipe away dust from glasses and computer screens—and if you’ve got a desktop PC, a dryer sheet taped over the ventilation slats can keep dust out without blocking the air movement. 

5. WIPE AWAY SOAP SCUM AND MINERAL DEPOSITS. 

Dampen the dryer sheet and use it to wipe off scummy surfaces in the bathroom and kitchen like shower doors or chrome fixtures.

6. CLEAN PAINT BRUSHES. 

Soak dirty paintbrushes in warm water that has a dryer sheet floating in it to make latex-based paint easier to slough off. 

7. DEODORIZE YOUR SMELLY SHOES. 

Just like dryer sheets absorb the nasty odors of dirty laundry, they can soak up your rancid foot smell. Stick half of one in each shoe before you go to bed, and enjoy fresher shoes in the morning. 

8. DETANGLE THREAD.  

Before you start sewing, stick the threaded needle through a dryer sheet. This keeps the static down, preventing the thread from sticking to itself and becoming a tangled mess. 

9. FRESHEN MUSTY USED BOOKS.

If the smell of dank libraries doesn’t please you, you can insert fresh dryer sheets into the pages of a musty used book. You can even perfume your whole bookshelf with this method

10. REMOVE PET HAIR. 

Wipe pet hair up off the couch or floor using a dryer sheet as your cloth. Rub it over the fabric to de-fur your furniture. 

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History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy
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Move Over, Golden Toilet: Now There’s a $100K Louis Vuitton Potty
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy

In 2016, the Guggenheim Museum installed a one-of-a-kind, fully functional toilet made of solid gold, created by the Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan just for the museum. Now, there’s another insanely luxurious art-toilet to look out for—and this one you can take home.

Made by artist Illma Gore for the luxury resale platform Tradesy, the Loo-Uis Vuitton Toilet is covered in $15,000 worth of monogram leather ripped from Louis Vuitton bags. Everything but the inside of the bowl—which is gold—is covered in that instantly recognizable brown designer leather. It's one way to show your brand loyalty, for sure.

The toilet is fully functional, meaning, yes, you can poop in it—although that would require you (at some point) to clean the leather undersides of the seat, which sounds … gross. But then again, the leather is brown, so do what you will.

A toilet art piece stands under a pink neon sign that reads ‘No Fake Shit.’
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy

Does sitting on it feel like using those squishy-soft toilet seats your grandma has? Please let us know, because we don’t have the $100,000 it would take to buy it for ourselves. Note that while the site sells used goods, the description makes sure to specify that this one is new.

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