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Mileniusz Spanowicz/WCS
Mileniusz Spanowicz/WCS

Bat With Insanely Long Tongue Found in Bolivia

Mileniusz Spanowicz/WCS
Mileniusz Spanowicz/WCS

The tube-lipped nectar bat has a tongue that’s longer than its entire body. Anoura fistulata, first discovered in Ecuador in 2005 [PDF], has only been observed in rare instances, but has just been found in a new place: Bolivia. 

Designed to reach deep into flowers to suck out nectar, the bat’s tongue, at 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches), is 150 percent the size of its body. The root of the tongue, which is up to twice the length of its other Anoura brethren, begins all the way down in the bat’s rib cage. It's the longest tongue (relative to its body) of any mammal. 

The bat was found as part of an 18-month-long expedition in Madidi National Park in Bolivia. Since June, scientists have been combing the 7,300 square-mile park for new species. They’ve cataloged 500 species of vertebrates, uncovering 60 animals they didn’t know lived in the park, including what they think is an entirely new species of frog. 

[h/t: Washington Post]

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Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
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science
Scientists May Have Found a Cure for Deadly White-Nose Syndrome in Bats
Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

White-nose syndrome, a disease that affects insect-eating bats, is one of the most devastating wildlife diseases on record. But there may be a relatively simple way to stop it, according to new research: UV light.

As New Atlas reports, a new study from the U.S. Forest Service and the University of New Hampshire has found that only a few seconds of exposure to ultraviolet light causes permanent damage to the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. The results were published in Nature Communications on January 2.

White-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats in the United States and Canada over the past decade, according to the USGS. Bats infected by the fungus use more energy during their winter hibernation than healthy bats, meaning they might run out of their energy reserves and die before spring comes. The infection causes dangerous physiological changes including severe wing damage, weight loss, and dehydration.

The P. destructans fungus can grow only in temperatures ranging from 39°F to 68°F, so it infects bats only when they're hibernating. But it's also hard to treat diseased bats as they hibernate, making it even more difficult for scientists to stop the disease. And stopping it is a big deal, not just for wildlife organizations but for governments and farmers, since the bats at risk are important predators that feed on crop-destroying insects. Previous research has shown that UV light can screen hibernating bats for white-nose syndrome—the skin lesions that form on the wings of infected bats glow orange-yellow under UV light—but this is the first study to show it can also be a treatment.

The researchers exposed six closely related Pseudogymnoascus species to UV light for a few seconds to see how the fungi would react. (P. destructans was the only pathogenic species involved.) They found that P. destructans lacked a key enzyme that helps it repair the DNA damage inflicted by exposure to UV light. Whereas other species weren't affected by the light, P. destructans exposed to a low dose of UV light had only a 15 percent survival rate. When that dosage was doubled (to what was still a moderate dose), the species had less than a 1 percent survival rate.

This extreme sensitivity to UV light could be a way for scientists to battle white-nose syndrome. But first they'll have to test the effects of the light on infected, hibernating bats, instead of just working with samples of the fungus in the lab. It's possible that the light could damage the bats' skin, killing off important species in their microbiome, or have some other unintended effect. But even as a preliminary finding, this is a hopeful step.

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Deb Wright
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Animals
The ‘Yoda Bat’ Gets an Even Cuter Name
Deb Wright
Deb Wright

The fruit bat formerly known as Yoda has found its forever name. Scientists christened the happy tube-nosed fruit bat in the Records of the Australian Museum.

The genus Nyctimene comprises 18 species, all of which live in Oceania and southeast Asia. They’ve got bright fur and faces, and noticeable spots on their wings. They will do just about anything for a mushy piece of fruit.

The family tree is no stranger to memorable common names, with cousins like N. draconilla, the dragon tube-nosed bat, and N. masalai, the demonic tube-nosed bat.

But wacky names aside, it would be hard to spot the dragon or the demon amid a lineup of other Nyctimene species.

“Bat species often look similar to each other,” biologist and co-author Nancy Irwin of York University said in a statement, “but differ significantly in behavior, feeding, and history.”

The newest member of the family showed its smiling little face during a field survey of Papua New Guinea in the late 1990s. Surveyors brought the bat to Irwin, who suspected it was a separate species. For its wrinkly ears and sage but goofy smile, she nicknamed the bat Yoda.

To confirm that they did, in fact, have a new species on their hands, Irwin and her colleagues combed through the scientific literature and museum collections. They examined nearly 3000 bat specimens from 18 museums.

A happy tube-nosed fruit bat with her baby and a postage stamp featuring an illustration of an unknown tube-nosed fruit bat.
Happy tube-nosed fruit bat (L) and a postage stamp (R) showing an unknown Nyctimene species, because they all look the same.
(L) Nancy Irwin; (R) Illustration by Julie Himes.

Many years and many, many research hours later, Irwin and her colleagues can confidently say the Yoda bat is a species unto itself. But they won’t call it Yoda anymore—since, as Irwin points out, most local Papuans have never seen the Star Wars movies, and the word "Yoda" means nothing to them.

She went with Hamamas (a local word for happy) instead. Its full name is the Hamamas tube-nosed fruit bat, Nyctimene wrightae sp. nov. (new species). The species name was chosen in honor of conservationist and scientist Deb Wright, who spent two decades exploring and protecting Papua New Guinea wildlife.

“Until a species is recognized and has a name,” Irwin says, “it becomes difficult to recognize the riches of biodiversity and devise management. Fruit bats are crucial to rainforest health, pollinating and dispersing many tree species, therefore it is essential we know what is there and how we can protect it, for our own benefit.”

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