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Stoners Keep Stealing 420 Mile Markers, So Some States Have Replaced Them With 419.9

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There's nothing inherently funny about mile 420 on the highway. But ever since the code between high schoolers looking to get high after class became a universal symbol of marijuana culture, every instance of 420 has become a stoner punch line—including innocent mile markers. Not all states have long enough highways to necessitate a "Mile 420" sign, but those that do have a shared, recurring problem: People keep stealing them.

The Associated Press reports that Idaho has recently joined states like Washington and Colorado in efforts to replace "Mile 420" signs with "Mile 419.9," which are not nearly as popular with cannabis enthusiasts.

Adam Rush of the Idaho Transportation Department confirmed to the AP that this was an unusual move for them. "Having a sign removed from a highway is pretty rare," Rush noted. "In Idaho, people will shoot at them or write on them before stealing them completely. We spend more time mending signs than replacing them."

In Washington, one of the two 420 mileposts in the state was replaced in 2012, the same year it legalized recreational marijuana use. The sign that was not replaced has since gone missing.

"Obviously people steal these signs," Colorado Department of Transportation spokeswoman Amy Ford told the Denver Post last year after the state replaced its only "Mile 420" sign. "In the past, if a sign was stolen too much, we wouldn't replace it. This is sort of an innovative way for us to keep the sign there."

Innovative, but not unprecedented, as Jamie Fuller of New York Magazine notes. In Colorado, the practice of replacing potentially salacious signs with more innocent fractions actually started when Mile 69 had to be replaced with Mile 68.5.

[h/t New York Magazine]

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entertainment
Move Over, Star Wars Land: A Star Trek World May Be Coming to Universal Studios
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Getty Images

As Disney gears up for the 2019 openings of Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge at both its Florida and California amusement parks, there may be some sci-fi-themed competition on the horizon. According to Disney and More, there’s a rumor out there that Universal is planning a fourth Orlando theme park, which will include a land dedicated to all things Star Trek.

The blog also states that there have been rumblings that a Star Trek stage show at Universal would take the place of the now-defunct Terminator 2 3D show, but that’s just one option, with a Bourne Identity attraction being the other. Instead, the potential Star Trek show could be expanded to a whole area of the rumored fourth park, with a focus on a recreation of a sci-fi city, according to the site.

This rumored park would be the most high-profile Trek attraction since Las Vegas's Star Trek: The Experience (as seen in the main image). Housed at the Las Vegas Hilton from 1998 to 2008, Star Trek: The Experience included a restaurant based on Quark's bar from Deep Space Nine and the popular Borg Invasion 4D, which was an attraction that combined motion platforms, live actors, and a short 3D film to simulate a Borg takeover.

Any potential Star Trek land would be much further off than Galaxy's Edge's fall 2019 debut in Orlando. But with two new Trek movies on the horizon, and Star Trek: Discovery returning to CBS All Access for a second season in 2018, the venerable sci-fi franchise might just be able to ride a wave of momentum to become real competition for Star Wars—if not at the box office, then at least as a theme park.

[h/t Screen Rant]

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Nikola Bradonjic
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Design
5 Wacky Ideas to Redesign the Skateboard
Design by Karim Rashid
Design by Karim Rashid
Nikola Bradonjic

Most skateboards come in a few basic shapes. They may be different widths or lengths, have kicktails or flat noses, or different imagery painted on their decks, but for the average rider, they look fairly similar. That’s not the case with the skateboard decks below, created as part of a competition during NYCxDESIGN, an annual New York City design festival.

For a competition called DeckxDesign, the award-winning design firm frog asked a group of notable branding agencies, artists, product designers, and other creative professionals to reimagine the humble skateboard.

This is the second NYCxDesign competition frog has hosted—in 2017, the agency asked designers to reimagine the dart board.

This time, individual designers like Karim Rashid and groups from firms like MakerBot, Motivate (the company behind bike sharing systems like Citi Bike), and frog itself came up with new ways to skate. There were no rules, just the simple prompt: Design a skateboard.

The results included a piece of furniture, a repurposed Citi Bike tube on wheels, a board covered in greenery, one covered in black faux alpaca hair, a skateboard made from recycled trash, and more. Below are some of the most unusual.

A white table that looks like a skateboard
Design by Aruliden
Nikola Bradonjic

A recycled piece of a Citi Bike on wheels
Design by Citi Bike/Motivate
Nikola Bradonjic

A wavy skateboard with purple, spherical wheels
Design by Karim Rashid
Nikola Bradonjic

A skateboard covered in faux alpaca fiber
Design by Staple Design
Nikola Bradonjic

A skateboard covered in mounds of greenery
Design by XY Feng & Jung Soo Park
Nikola Bradonjic

All of the skateboards created for the competition were later auctioned off to benefit the New York City-based nonprofit Art Start.

All images by Nikola Brandonjic

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