CLOSE
Hoangvantoanajc via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
Hoangvantoanajc via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

The Vietnamese Festival Where Ex-Lovers Reunite

Hoangvantoanajc via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
Hoangvantoanajc via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Before Facebook, there was no simple way to casually catch up with exes from back in the day. That is unless you lived in the small village in Vietnam that dedicates two days of the year to reuniting with the ones who got away. 

The "Khau Vai Love Market” is held on the 26th and 27th of the third month of the lunar calendar in the isolated Khau Vai commune. The festival originates from a local legend that tells the story of an ethnic Giay girl who fell in love with an Nung boy from a neighboring province. The girl was so beautiful that her tribe refused to let her marry an outsider, and a bloody conflict between the two communities ensued. The couple agreed to split up to prevent any further bloodshed, but made a secret covenant to meet for one day out of the year. Now every year on that day, the tradition of reuniting with past loves is celebrated in Khau Vai. 

Ex-lovers were often couples who were unable to marry for one reason or another, and they use the Love Market as an opportunity to reminisce about happy moments from their past. For visitors who have since married, their spouses don’t mind because they’re catching up with old flames of their own. 

The tradition holds less significance than it did in its early years, now that flings are less taboo and exes are just a text message away. But even as its significance wanes, it's also increased in popularity due to the new roads that make the village more accessible and the curious tourists flocking in from greater Vietnam and beyond. Even attendees with no ex-lovers to meet can visit the Love Market to enjoy the regional cuisine or watch a performance of its origin story. And who knows? They may even find a future ex-lover while they’re there. 

[h/t: Reuters]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Animals
Miami to Host Inaugural Canine Film Festival
iStock
iStock

There’s an annual festival dedicated to internet cat videos, so it only makes sense that dog-lovers would create their own film event. As the Miami New-Times reports, the Magic City will host the inaugural Canine Film Festival on July 15 and 16. The fundraising event encourages movie lovers to enjoy submitted flicks with their furry friends.

The festival will take place at the Cinépolis Coconut Grove and Hotel Indigo in Miami Lakes. Festivities kick off on the first day with “A Day at the Movies With Your Dog,” featuring film screenings attended by dogs and humans alike. Other events scheduled throughout the weekend include a dog fashion show, dog yoga, silent auctions, a canine costume contest, an after-party at Miami Lakes' Hotel Indigo, and an awards ceremony.

Admission costs $10 to $1000, and 50 percent of ticket proceeds will benefit local animal rescues and shelters. For more information, visit the Canine Film Festival's website.

[h/t Miami New Times]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Nicolas Raymond // CC BY 2.0
D.C.’s Cherry Blossoms Will Arrive Extra Early This Year
Nicolas Raymond // CC BY 2.0
Nicolas Raymond // CC BY 2.0

Spring is busting out in Washington, D.C. The city’s beloved cherry trees have already begun to bloom, forcing organizers of the annual Cherry Blossom Festival to start the event one week earlier than planned, ABC News reports.

The National Park Service is currently estimating that peak bloom—that is, the short period when 70 percent of the Yoshino cherry blossoms will be open—will begin around March 14. Last year, peak bloom began on March 25. In the years before that, the blossoms peaked in early April. The Cherry Blossom Festival will begin March 15, rather than March 20, and continue through April 16.

“Cherry tree dates vary from year to year, but the long-term trend shows earlier and earlier blooming,” climate change scientist Patrick Gonzalez said in a video for the National Park Service. Blooms can be forced by unseasonably warm winters, although as the last three years have been the hottest ever recorded, we may soon need to adjust our definition of “unseasonably warm.”

The National Park Service notes that the exact dates of prime pink-petal viewing are “almost impossible” to predict more than 10 days in advance.

The hundreds of cherry trees planted throughout the nation's capital and the Tidal Basin were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912 and have since become one of D.C.’s most famous tourist attractions. Yet as big as the blossoms are here, they’re even bigger in Japan, where their fragility, loveliness, and oh-so-brief appearance represent the beauty and impermanence of life.

[h/t: ABC News]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios