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10 Bo-Time Facts about Bojangles’ Famous Chicken 'n Biscuits

Sure, Bojangles’ might only exist in 11 states, but it’s become the stuff of legend—from their flaky biscuits to spicy Cajun chicken to breakfast all day, their fans span the country. 

1. THE FOUNDERS WERE NO FAST-FOOD ROOKIES.

Before starting Bojangles’ in 1977, the co-founders had plenty of experience. Richard Thomas worked his first food-service job at 10 and then owned several KFC franchises in Michigan before becoming President of Operations of the Kentucky chain. Jack Fulk perfected making biscuits while he owned a Hardee’s franchise in North Carolina, where he would get in trouble for tinkering with the corporation's recipes. His personal biscuit recipe was so good, in fact, that sales jumped 60 percent when he and Thomas added them to the Bojangles' menu.

2. THEY AREN'T KIDDING WHEN THEY SAY THEIR FOOD IS MADE FROM SCRATCH.

Unlike many other fast food joints, "made from scratch" means all of it, all the time. The chicken is delivered fresh each day (i.e. not frozen), and each location goes through a lengthy 12-hour marination and 8-step, hand-done breading process. And Fulk's biscuit recipe isn't just shipped out, ready to toss in the oven. Bojangles' executive vice-president Eric Newman says a new batch of freshly made biscuits is made every 20 mins. “Biscuits are an art form,” he told the Nashville Post in 2011. “It’s a highly honored position in our restaurants. It’s an intricate, delicate process to manage.”

3. THEIR BISCUIT PROCESS IS NO JOKE.

The key to their famous biscuits isn’t just the ingredients, but the kneading. “There’s an exact way of pressing down on the dough, and all, but it’s secret,” one executive told The New Yorker in 1982. Added Bob Raspanti, then-director of the company’s Master Biscuit Maker Training Center, “It’s like painting. You can do it by the numbers, but it's not the same. You have to understand it.”

4. YOU WANT SOME CASH WITH THAT CHICKEN?

This summer, a Bojangles' customer got far more than fried chicken in his take-out box—it was also stuffed with $4,500 cash. He returned the money and receipts, and then complained that the company wasn't gracious enough. He received a $100 Bojangles' gift card as a reward.

5. BOJANGLES' GIVES BACK TO THEIR EMPLOYEES.

In 2011, the company set up a scholarship foundation in memory of co-founder Jack Fulk, which gives $1,000 academic scholarships to 10 employees or their family members each year.

6. THE YANKS ARE MISSING OUT.

Bojangles' opened a location in New York to much fanfare in 1982. Their New Yorker write-up was a minute-by-minute rundown of their record-breaking first day—but the store shut down after the company’s 2007 acquisition by Falfurrias Capital Partners because it was the sole location in the North. The company did send 100 executives and employees to Times Square to hand out free breakfast this spring though when Bojangles' went public. 

7. DO THAT EGG BACON CHEESE.

You know any fast food joint with fan-made music videos has to be good. Durham, N.C. rapper J Steez loved their breakfast menu and sweet tea so much, he wrote a whole song about being "BOJ Gs."

8. BOJANGLES' IS ON THAT SPORTS WAGON.

Streeter Lecka // Getty

Not only did Bojangles' buy the naming rights to the Charlotte Coliseum, they also sponsor NASCAR’s historic Southern 500 race, held every Labor Day weekend in South Carolina.

9. NEW YORK IS TOO FAR FOR A LOCATION, BUT HONDURAS HAS HOW MANY?

Honduras is home to not one, but two Bojangles' locations, and surprisingly, the one in Coxen Hole on the island of Roatán was named one of the best places to eat by Fodor’s Central America Guide.

10. FOR A SOLID DECADE, SPICY CHICKEN WAS THE ONLY OPTION.

Their original recipe was spicy, and they didn’t launch the mild version until 1986. And when they did, they did it with this oh-so-1980s commercial.

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Live Smarter
The Only Way to Answer ‘What Is Your Greatest Weakness?’ In a Job Interview
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Thanks in part to the influence of Silicon Valley and its focus on the psychological probing of job applicants, interview questions have been steadily getting more and more abstract. As part of the interview process, today's job seekers might be asked to describe a vending machine to someone who’s never seen one before, or plan a fantasy date with a famous historical figure.

Even if the company you’re approaching isn’t fully on board with prodding your brain, at some point you may still come up against one of the most common queries applicants face: "What is your greatest weakness?"

"Some 'experts' will tell you to try and turn a strength into a 'weakness,' to make yourself look good," writes Inc. contributor Justin Bariso. "That advice is garbage."

"Think about it," Bariso continues. "Interviewers are asking the same question to countless candidates. Just try and guess how many times they hear the answers 'being a perfectionist' or 'working too much.' (Hint: way too often.)"

While responding that you work too hard might seem like a reliable method of moving the conversation along, there’s a better way. And it involves being sincere.

"The fact is, it's not easy to identify one's own weaknesses," Bariso writes. "Doing so takes intense self-reflection, critical thinking, and the ability to accept negative feedback—qualities that have gone severely missing in a world that promotes instant gratification and demands quick (often thoughtless) replies to serious issues."

Bariso believes the question is an effective way to reveal an applicant’s self-awareness, which is why companies often use it in their vetting process. By being self-aware, people (and employees) can correct behavior that might be affecting job performance. So the key is to give this question some actual thought before it’s ever posed to you.

What is your actual greatest weakness? It could be that, in a desire to please everyone, you wind up making decisions based on the urge to avoid disappointing others. That’s a weakness that sounds authentic.

Pondering the question also has another benefit: It prompts you to think of areas in your life that could use some course-correcting. Even if you don’t land that job—or even if the question is never posed to you—you’ve still made time for self-reflection. The result could mean a more confident and capable presence for that next interview.

[h/t Inc.]

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Words
This Is the Most Commonly Misspelled Word on Job Resumes
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by Reader's Digest Editors

Your resume is your first chance to make a good impression with hiring managers. One misspelled word might not seem like a huge deal, but it can mean the difference between looking competent and appearing lazy. A 2014 Accountemps survey of 300 senior managers found that 63 percent of employers would reject a job candidate who had just one or two typos on their resume.

Most misspellings on resumes slip through the cracks because spellcheck doesn’t catch them. The most common misspelling on resumes is a shockingly simple word—or so you’d think.

Career coach and resume writer Jared Redick of Resume Studio in San Francisco tells Business Insider that the most common misspelling he sees by far is confusing “lead” with “led.” If you’re talking about how you run meetings at your current job, the correct spelling is “lead,” which is in the present tense. If the bullet point is from a former position, use lead’s past tense: led. Yes, “lead” as in the metal can also be pronounced “led,” but most people have no need to discuss chemical elements on their job resumes.

 
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Other spelling mistakes Redick has seen pop up over and over again on resumes is spelling “definitely” as “definately” (which spellcheck thankfully should catch) and adding an e in “judgment” (“judgement” is the British spelling, but “judgment” is preferred in American English).

To avoid the cringe factor of noticing little typos after sending out your application—especially if your misspelling actually is a real word that spellcheck recognizes—always proofread your resume before submitting. Slowly reading it out loud will take just a few minutes, but it could mean the difference between an interview and a rejection.

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