CLOSE
Unleashed by Petco
Unleashed by Petco

Action-Packed Photos of Dogs Surfing

Unleashed by Petco
Unleashed by Petco

Hundreds of onlookers crowded the shores of California’s Imperial Beach on Saturday to catch a glimpse of one of the year’s most anticipated sporting events: the Unleashed by Petco Surf Dog Competition.

“As a staple San Diego event, we’re excited to continue the local Surf Dog tradition and foster the powerful bond between pets and pet parents,” says Evan Harding, director of marketing for Unleashed by Petco. “We welcome all pet lovers down to Imperial Beach for a day full of doggie paddles and fun in the sun.”

Now in its 10th year, the annual event saw approximately 60 pooches hang 20 (with their owners in tow) and compete in five different categories: Small Dog, Medium Dog, Large Dog, X-Large Dog, and Tandem Surf. All proceeds from the event—which also features a beer garden (for the human attendees), dog food garden, an agility course (also for the canine attendees), food trucks, and adoptable dogs—benefit the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA. Here are some action-packed snaps from this year’s event.

The Small Dog competition was one of this year's tightest races, with Coppertone (left) and reigning champ Ziggy (right) racing toward the finish line.

Ultimately, Ziggy—a 15-pound Toy American Eskimo—was able to retain his crown as king of the small surf dogs.

Australian Kelpie Abbie Girl—another returning champ—had reason to run a victory lap when she took first place in the Medium Dog Competition.

Soda the Pomeranian finishes up her ride like it's NBD.

Giselle may not have taken home a trophy, but she got major style points for this backward maneuver.

Say cheese!

The crowd is suitably enthused.

Redefining the phrase "nose-to-nose."

Strong surfers come in small packages.

I think I can, I think I can.

Kalani (left) and Hanzo (right) are two dogs with a major fan base. The duo managed to cinch their third consecutive victory in the Tandem Surf competition.

Hanzo, a Boxer who has been skateboarding since he was eight weeks old, also took first place in the X-Large Dog competition. (Last year, he was the Large Dog winner.) Not to be outdone, Hanzo's partner Kalani—a Golden Retriever whose nickname is "Lil' Surfer Girl"—placed first in the Large Dog Competition.

Some dogs are wetter than others.

Until next year ...

All photos courtesy Unleashed by Petco
nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Animals
The Simple Way to Protect Your Dog From Dangerous Rock Salt
iStock
iStock

Winter can be a tough time for dogs. The cold weather usually means there are fewer opportunities for walks and more embarrassing accessories for them to wear. But the biggest threat to canines this time of year is one pet owners may not notice: the dangerous rock salt coating the streets and sidewalks. If you live someplace where this is a problem, here are the steps you need to take to keep your pooch safe until the weather warms up, according to Life Hacker.

Rock salt poses two major hazards to pets: damage to their feet and poisoning from ingestion. The first is the one most pet owners are aware of. Not only do large grains of salt hurt when they get stuck in a dog’s paws, but they can also lead to frostbite and chemical burns due to the de-icing process at work. The easiest way to prevent this is by covering your dog’s paws before taking them outside. Dog booties get the job done, as do protective balms and waxes that can be applied directly to their pads.

The second danger is a little harder to anticipate. The only way you can stop your dog from eating rock salt from the ground is to keep a close eye on them. Does your dog seem a little too interested in a puddle or a mound of snow? Encourage them to move on before they have a chance to take a lick.

If, for some reason, you forget to follow the steps above and your pet has a bad encounter with some winter salt, don’t panic. For salty feet, soak your dog's paws in warm water once you get inside to wash away any remaining grit. If your dog exhibits symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, and disorientation and you suspect they’ve ingested rock salt, contact your vet right away.

Even with the proper protection, winter can still create an unsafe environment for dogs. Check out this handy chart to determine when it’s too cold to take them for a walk.

[h/t Life Hacker]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
© Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
arrow
Animals
Boston's Museum of Fine Arts Hires Puppy to Sniff Out Art-Munching Bugs
© Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
© Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Some dogs are qualified to work at hospitals, fire departments, and airports, but one place you don’t normally see a pooch is in the halls of a fine art museum. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is changing that: As The Boston Globe reports, a young Weimaraner named Riley is the institution’s newest volunteer.

Even without a background in art restoration, Riley will be essential in maintaining the quality of the museum's masterpieces. His job is to sniff out the wood- and canvas-munching pests lurking in the museum’s collection. During the next few months, Riley will be trained to identify the scents of bugs that pose the biggest threat to the museum’s paintings and other artifacts. (Moths, termites, and beetles are some of the worst offenders.)

Some infestations can be spotted with the naked eye, but when that's impossible, the museum staff will rely on Riley to draw attention to the problem after inspecting an object. From there, staff members can examine the piece more closely and pinpoint the source before it spreads.

Riley is just one additional resource for the MFA’s existing pest control program. As far as the museum knows, it's rare for institutions facing similar problems to hire canine help. If the experiment is successful, bug-sniffing dogs may become a common sight in art museums around the world.

[h/t The Boston Globe]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios