11 Movies That Could Have Starred Tom Cruise

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Getty

Whether you’re a fan of his films or not, there’s no denying that Tom Cruise—who turns 56 today—is the epitome of a movie star. Unlike so many of his contemporaries, who struggled for years to find their big breaks, Cruise’s career has been seemingly blessed from the very beginning. Within two years of making his big-screen debut in 1981’s Endless Love, Cruise turned in memorable performances in Taps, The Outsiders, Risky Business, and All the Right Moves. But for every Maverick, Jerry Maguire, and Ethan Hunt that Cruise has portrayed on the big screen, there are plenty of well-known parts that never came to be for the actor for one reason or another. Here are 11 of them.

1. FOOTLOOSE (1984)

Fresh off the success of playing teen pimp Joel Goodsen in Risky Business, the producers of Footloose were convinced that Cruise had what it takes to pull off playing a high schooler determined to get his tiny town’s “no dancing” law repealed. (They had seen Cruise rocking out in his tighty-whities to Bob Seger, after all.) But Cruise’s schedule wouldn’t allow for it, as he was shooting All the Right Moves at the same time.

2. EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (1990)

Though he’d proven that he could make a big-budget movie that still turned a profit with 1989’s Batman, Tim Burton was still somewhat at the studio’s mercy when it came to casting his next project, Edward Scissorhands. And what the studio wanted was simple: Cruise in the titular role. “He certainly wasn’t my ideal, but I talked to him,” Burton recalled. “He was interesting, but I think it worked out for the best. A lot of questions came up—I don’t really recall the specifics—but at the end of the meeting I did feel like, and I probably even said this to him, ‘It’s nice to have a lot of questions about the character, but you either do it or you don’t do it.’”

3. THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (1994)

There’s only one thing that stood in the way of Tom Cruise playing Andy Dufresne in The Shawshank Redemption: “a sh*tload of dough” in Frank Darabont’s pocket. Though it had always been the plan that Darabont, who had never directed a feature film before, would both write and direct the big-screen adaptation of the Stephen King short story, Rob Reiner (who produced the film) had a momentary change of heart. After working with Cruise on A Few Good Men, Reiner realized that The Shawshank Redemption could be a great opportunity for him and Cruise to re-team on a project. So he made Darabont an offer he (almost) couldn’t refuse: the aforementioned “sh*tload of dough” in order to turn directing duties over to Reiner, so that he could make the movie with Cruise. And it was a tempting offer.

“In my struggling-writer days, I could barely meet the rent,” Darabont told Vanity Fair. By taking the deal, Darabont would not only have cash in his pocket, but he'd be able to make a quick name for himself in the industry he was trying to conquer—and he admits that the dilemma “completely tormented” him. Ultimately, the would-be first-time director realized that “you can continue to defer your dreams in exchange for money and, you know, die without ever having done the thing you set out to do.” So Darabont said no to Reiner and went on to direct the movie, which garnered seven Oscar nominations, including one for Best Picture and another for Darabont’s script.

4. DONNIE BRASCO (1997)

Like so many movies before (and after) it, Donnie Brasco made the rounds in Hollywood for many years before actually going into production. And the more time that passed, the more actors and directors became attached to it—and dropped out, including Tom Cruise and director Stephen Frears.

5. GHOST (1990)

In his autobiography, The Time of My Life—which he co-wrote with his wife, Lisa Niemi—Patrick Swayze recounted how when his name was brought up as a possible fit for romantic lead Sam Wheat, Ghost director Jerry Zucker responded with, “Over my dead body!” (Zucker apparently couldn’t separate Swayze from his Roadhouse alter ego, Dalton.) While Demi Moore had already been cast, Swayze wrote that “a Who’s Who of leading men were under consideration, including Kevin Bacon, Alec Baldwin, Tom Cruise, Harrison Ford, and Tom Hanks, but the role was still open. Zucker was absolutely convinced that I was the wrong guy for the role, but he finally agreed to at least let me audition for it.” The rest, of course, is history.

6. INDECENT PROPOSAL (1993)

Ghost wasn’t the only Demi Moore-starring romantic drama Cruise was up for. He was also being considered for the role of David (the husband) in Indecent Proposal, with then-wife Nicole Kidman in contention for the part of Diana and Warren Beatty as the propositioning millionaire. In an interview with the Sun Sentinel, director Adrian Lyne shared how Cruise was circling the role of the husband. “I tested Nicole Kidman later,” said Lyne. “She was good, but it didn’t work out. Demi was better. I’ve seen Demi for every movie I’ve done, and I’ve watched her change. She’s lovely to watch in a tactile way.”

7. A BEAUTIFUL MIND (2001)

Before it was a Ron Howard film starring Russell Crowe, A Beautiful Mind was set to be a Robert Redford film starring Tom Cruise as Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Nash. Ultimately, Cruise opted to star in Vanilla Sky instead.

8. RUMBLE FISH (1983)

After working with Francis Ford Coppola on The Outsiders, the legendary director offered Cruise a role in his follow-up film, Rumble Fish. Though Cruise was anxious to work with Coppola again, he told Interview Magazine that the offer came in “the same week I was offered Risky Business.”

9. SALT (2010)

In the earliest days of its development, Salt—Phillip Noyce’s 2010 action-crime-mystery—was about a man, Edwin A. Salt. And that man was (hopefully) going to be Cruise. “Tom was flirting with the part, and we just couldn't pin him down,” Noyce told NBC Bay Area. “Eventually he did Knight and Day instead.”

10. STARMAN (1984)

In casting his cult classic alien romance movie, director John Carpenter told The Boston Globe that the studio “wanted Tom Cruise for the lead. But when I auditioned actresses in New York, Karen Allen was far and away the best. I wanted her for Jenny Hayden, and so we had to go with actors her age. I didn't want a big star to play the male lead because there might be too much identification with other roles. I thought of Jeff Bridges because he's a name actor, yet he's not a big celebrity.”

11. IRON MAN (2008)

That Iron Man director Jon Favreau had a tough time getting the studio to say yes to Robert Downey Jr. as a superhero is by now legend. And it probably didn’t help his cause that Cruise had expressed an interest in taking the part, and reportedly producing the film, too. But when pressed on the topic of the project’s status in 2005, Cruise stated that “It's not happening. Not with me, no … They came to me at a certain point and, when I do something, I wanna do it right. If I commit to something, it has to be done in a way that I know it's gonna be something special. And as it was lining up, it just didn't feel to me like it was gonna work. I need to be able to make decisions and make the film as great as it can be, and it just didn't go down that road that way.”

10 Amazing Facts About Stan Lee

BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Comic book legend Stan Lee’s life was always an open book. The co-creator of some of the greatest superheroes and most beloved stories of all time, Lee—who passed away on November 12 at the age of 95—became just as mythical and larger-than-life as the characters in the panels. In 2015, around the time of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, Lee had the idea to reflect on his own life, as he said, “in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comic book … or if you prefer, a graphic memoir.”

The result, published by the Touchstone imprint of Simon & Schuster in 2015, was Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir—which was written by Lee with Peter David and features artwork by cartoonist and illustrator Colleen Doran. Here are 10 things we learned about Lee.

1. HIS WIFE WAS ALSO HIS BARBER.

As a bit of a throwaway fact, Stanley Martin Lieber (Stan Lee) revealed the secret of his slicked back mane on the second page of his memoir. “My whole adult life, I’ve never been to a barber,” he wrote. “Joanie always cuts my hair.”

2. HIS CONFIDENCE CAME FROM HIS MOTHER.

Lee wrote that as a child he loved to read books by Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and others, and his mother often watched him read: “I probably got my self-confidence from the fact that my mother thought everything I did was brilliant.”

3. YOUNG STAN LEE WROTE OBITUARIES.

Before writing about the fantastic lives of fictional characters, Lee wrote antemortem obituaries for celebrities at an undisclosed news office in New York. He said that he eventually quit that job because it was too “depressing.”

4. CAPTAIN AMERICA WAS HIS FIRST BIG BREAK.

A week into his job at Timely Comics, Lee got the opportunity to write a two-page Captain America comic. He wrote it under the pen name Stan Lee (which became his legal name) and titled it "Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge." His first full comic script would come in Captain America Issue 5, published August 1, 1941.

5. HE WROTE TRAINING FILMS FOR THE ARMY WITH DR. SEUSS.

After being transferred from the army’s Signal Corps in New Jersey, Lee worked as a playwright in the Training Film Division in Queens with eight other men, including a few who went on to be very famous: Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Saroyan, cartoonist Charles Addams (creator of The Addams Family), director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington [1939] and It’s a Wonderful Life [1946]) and Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

6. HE DEFIED THE COMICS CODE AUTHORITY WITH AN ANTI-DRUG COMIC.

In 1971, Lee received a letter from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare asking him to put an anti-drug message in one of his books. He came up with a Spider-Man story that involved his best friend Harry abusing pills because of a break-up. The CCA would not approve the story with their seal because of the mention of drugs, but Lee convinced his publisher, Martin Goodman, to run the comic anyway.

7. AN ISSUE AT THE PRINTERS TURNED THE HULK GREEN.

The character was supposed to be gray, but according to Lee, the printer had a hard time keeping the color consistent. “So as of issue #2,” Lee wrote, “with no explanation, he turned green.”

8. HIS WIFE DESTROYED HIS PRIZED TYPEWRITER.

According to Lee, during an argument, Joanie destroyed the typewriter he used to write the first issues for characters including Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four. “This happened before eBay," he wrote. "Too bad. I could’ve auctioned the parts and made a mint.”

9. A FIRE DESTROYED HIS INTERVIEWS AND LECTURES.

When Lee moved his family to Los Angeles, he set up a studio in Van Nuys where he stored videotapes of his talks and interviews, along with a commissioned bust of his wife. The building was lost to a blaze that the fire department believed was arson, but no one was ever charged with the crime.

10. HIS FAVORITE MARVEL FILM CAMEO WAS BASED ON ONE FROM THE COMICS.

Beginning with the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Stan Lee has made quick cameos in Marvel films as a service to the fans. He said that his appearance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) was inspired by the story of Reed and Sue Richards’ wedding in Fantastic Four Annual Volume 1 #3, in which he and artist/writer Jack Kirby attempt to crash the ceremony but are thwarted.

A version of this story ran in 2015.

JK Rowling Reveals the Sweet Reason Why She Wrote Fantastic Beasts

Angela Weiss, AFP/Getty Images
Angela Weiss, AFP/Getty Images

With the release of Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald just a week away, ​JK Rowling is reflecting on her time writing the book that inspired the first film, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, and why she decided to expand on the Wizarding World she had created with the Harry Potter series.

While on the red carpet for the premiere of ​The Crimes of Grindelwald in Paris last week, Rowling spoke about how appreciative she is of the Harry Potter fandom that allows her to keep writing books and films. She also revealed the reason why she wanted to continue past the original series and write these movies: Potterheads!

"This fandom is the most remarkable in the world, for me, obviously," Rowling said. "Their loyalty and their passion for these stories really is the reason that I went back, because, without that, I don’t think I would have written these movies."

So there you have it, Potterheads: you really have yourselves to thank for the ​Potter universe's continued expansion. Keep it up and maybe Rowling will keep giving us more. In the meantime, Fantastic Beasts 2 hits theaters on November 16.

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