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Watch a Computer Program Sing '90s Power Ballads

If you’ve ever wondered what it might be like to karaoke with a computer, Martin Backes has you covered. The self-described “artist, designer, creative technologist, hacker, DJ and composer” has created a digital installation called “What Do Machines Sing Of?” featuring a fully-automated computer that attempts to sing ‘90s ballads with emotion—giving a whole new meaning to the phrase “once more, with feeling.” You can see the machine’s take on “I Will Always Love You,” and its algorithm at work, in the video above.

“As the computer program performs these emotionally loaded songs, it attempts to apply the appropriate human sentiments,” Backes writes on his website. “This behavior of the device seems to reflect a desire, on the part of the machine, to become sophisticated enough to have its very own personality.”

The computer’s algorithm was created using the programming language SuperCollider. The machine endlessly sings five songs on a loop: Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You,” R. Kelly’s “I Believe I Can Fly,” Toni Braxton’s “Un-Break My Heart,” Bryan Adams’s “Everything I Do, I Do It For You,” and Celine Dion’s “My Heart Will Go On.” When it’s done with one song, it searches through its collection and chooses the next selection randomly. The result is part autotune, part elevator music—all weird.

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fun
Here's How to Turn an IKEA Box Into a Spaceship
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Since IKEA boxes are designed to contain entire furniture items, they could probably fit a small child once they’re emptied of any flat-packed component pieces. This means they have great potential as makeshift forts—or even as play spaceships, according to one of the Swedish furniture brand’s print ads, which was spotted by Design Taxi.

First highlighted by Ads of the World, the advertisement—which was created by Miami Ad School, New York—shows that IKEA is helping customers transform used boxes into build-it-yourself “SPÄCE SHIPS” for children. The company provides play kits, which come with both an instruction manual and cardboard "tools" for tiny builders to wield during the construction process.

As for the furniture boxes themselves, they're emblazoned with the words “You see a box, they see a spaceship." As if you won't be climbing into the completed product along with the kids …

Check out the ad below:

[h/t Design Taxi]

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Food
The Best Cupcake in All 50 States
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We’re going to sugarcoat it. Twelve years after the advent of the cupcake-only bakery (the California-launched chain Sprinkles is credited with opening the first in 2005), there are a lot of options. We rounded up 50 of the best decadent desserts across the country. So go out, have your (cup)cake—and eat it, too.

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