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Lisa Frank, Facebook

17 Bright and Colorful Facts About Lisa Frank

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Lisa Frank, Facebook

In the ‘80s and ‘90s, Lisa Frank was the epitome of cool. Here are a few things you might not have known about the brand, and the woman behind it.

1. THERE’S A REAL PERSON BEHIND LISA FRANK INC. ... 

Though Lisa Frank is rarely seen and doesn’t grant interviews these days, she is, in fact, a real person (you can see photos of her here). Frank grew up in Detroit and, as a high school senior, sold $3000 worth of her art at an art show.

2. … AND SHE LAUNCHED THE COMPANY WHILE IN COLLEGE.

Frank went to the University of Arizona to study math and art, and told told Urban Outfitters in a rare interview (granted in 2012, when the retailer began selling vintage Lisa Frank pieces online) that when she made the decision, “my dad said 'That's fine, but you're going to support yourself.' ... I am sure that if I failed, he would have been there for me, but it was a sort of a tough-love situation.” To get by, she started her own business, according to the Arizona Daily Star, by buying “pottery and jewelry from area Indian tribes and [bringing] them home to Michigan to sell. Once the network of artists she met grew, she began to represent them and sell their handmade work.”

Eventually, she started telling artists what to make—then decided to make things herself. She launched Sticky Fingers, which featured plastic jewelry, when she was just 20; according to Jezebel, it was sold in Neiman Marcus and Bloomingdale’s. 

In 1979, when she was 24, Frank renamed the company Lisa Frank Inc., because, according to the Arizona Daily Star, “her name was more familiar to those in the industry since her days representing artists.” In her first year of business, Frank sold a $1 million sticker order to Spencer’s Gifts.

3. ONE OF FRANK’S FIRST DESIGNS WAS A GUMBALL MACHINE. 

The design that started it all....Iconic Lisa Frank!

Posted by Lisa Frank on Tuesday, May 1, 2012

“The gumball machine comes from when I was little,” Frank told UO. “My dad gave me an antique gumball machine, so that was my original logo ... And also, you know how when your friends find out you're into something, they start sending it to you? So I probably have a huge collection of gumballs somewhere.” 

The company’s early designs, she said, “were very simplistic. The very first thing we made before stickers were buttons, and since they were so small, we did the artwork very small too.” Eventually, the line would expand to include pencils, stationery, folders, lunchboxes, backpacks, Trapper Keepers, and more. 

4. INITIALLY, ALL OF THE ART WAS DRAWN AND COLORED BY HAND.

When Rondi Kutz joined Lisa Frank as an artist in 1987, she did concepts for designs with markers, acrylics, and airbrushing. “All of the art back then was done by airbrush, although they did have one computer that the creative director was learning to use,” she told HelloGiggles. “Then the other artists learned to create the airbrushed ‘look’ art and started to do all of the illustrations on the computer by 1988-89.” Kutz, who eventually became Lisa Frank, Inc.’s Senior Designer/Product Development Group Leader and worked there until 2002, said that she “had no patience for the computer, so continued to do concepts as marker renderings, which then went to the computer illustrators to clean up and illustrate.”

5. MANY ARTISTS COLLABORATED ON THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 

“The artwork was a collaborative effort, but it all began with me putting it on paper as a marker rendering,” Kutz told HelloGiggles. “The concepts came from Lisa, James (her husband), or me, so I can say that some of the characters were my idea and original design. But by the time it went to an illustrator to redraw it, adding detail, then to the computer artist who rendered it on the computer (which entailed hundreds of hours of work), it had many artists’ stamps on it.”

Frank herself said that “We have to stop me and say ‘OK, it’s enough!’ Because one illustration can have hundreds of hours in it. It’s really kind of madness.” (“Lisa is fanatical about detail,” Kutz said. “But that is what makes her art so extraordinary.”)

6. FRANK HAS TWO FAVORITE CHARACTERS.

They're the rainbow print leopard and tiger cubs named Hunter and Forrest, “who are based off my kids!” Frank told UO. “Forrest is based on my 13-year-old, and Hunter is a 17-year-old character who was named the day Hunter was born. We had created both characters before the boys were born, and then when they were born, we thought, ‘Oh my gosh, they really do fit their personalities!’” 

7. MOST OF THE CHARACTERS ARE NAMED AFTER REAL PEOPLE … 

Naming two characters after her kids wasn’t isolated event: “We actually really try to base our characters off of people who are in our lives or who have been in our lives, and sometimes it's in memory. We ask people first,” Frank said, noting that she based two characters, Casey and Caymus, on her first golden retrievers. No one, Frank said, has refused: “People are actually begging us ‘Can you do a character with my name?’” 

8. … AND ONE EARLY CHARACTER HAS A SAD ORIGIN STORY.

Markie, one of Frank’s first characters, lives in the clouds above the Fantastic World of Lisa Frank (a.k.a. Airfluff Island), likes butterflies, exploring, collecting stars, cloud hopping, and dreams, and hates hesitation, bad smells, [and] bullies. Frank told UO that the unicorn was “named after a friend of ours who died super-young of a heart attack.” 

9. THERE’S A SPECIAL LISA FRANK INK. 

“We have a proprietary ink formula that I developed really early on so that everything would be brighter,” Frank told UO. “It's typical of a four-color process, but we use a special mixture to make those colors.” All licensees have to sign a confidentiality agreement because the mixture is a closely guarded secret.

10. ONE CHARACTER HAS A LOT IN COMMON WITH FRANK HERSELF. 

Though she said there’s “probably a little bit of me in each character,” Frank told Urban Outfitters that the character that’s a lot like her is Purrscilla, “because she is very into glam and glitz and jewelry and everything very girly.” The cat even wears illustrated versions of Frank’s own jewelry. Funnily enough, Frank said that she’s not a cat person—she prefers dogs. 

11. MILA KUNIS STARRED IN A LISA FRANK COMMERCIAL IN THE ‘90S.

She also appeared on the cover of the company’s fan magazine, Lisa and Me, in 1997.

12. THERE WAS A LISA FRANK CLOTHING LINE ... 

It came out in 2011 and featured the bright colors and characters synonymous with Frank; all pieces were under $20

13. … AND A COLLABORATION WITH ED HARDY.

The tattoo artist’s line of office supplies featured art by Lisa Frank Inc.

14. LISA FRANK’S HQ IS LOCATED ON S. LISA FRANK AVENUE IN TUCSON, ARIZONA.

"The World of Lisa Frank" - A Short Film from Scott Ross on Vimeo.

The street was initially named South Masterson Avenue, after Bat Masterson, a friend of Wyatt Earp’s. It was renamed S. Lisa Frank Avenue in 1997—a move that prompted a protest from American Airlines, which was also located on the road and didn’t find out about the name change until a new street sign appeared.  

Today, Frank’s 320,000 square foot facility, which features colorful characters inside and out, is mostly empty. According to a 2013 New York Times article, “Her factory, once bustling with hundreds of employees, has six staff members … Frank’s company, a victim of protracted legal battles over ownership and bad manufacturing deals, faded from popular culture—not an uncommon fate of the animal known as the retail fad.”

15. THE OFFICES HAVE A FIRE-PROOF VAULT.

There, the company stores copies of everything it’s ever made, plus the original artwork that was done before computers. Known as The Library, it holds thousands of products. “I think we made so many products because I get bored easily,” Frank told Urban Outfitters. “So as soon as we would master a category, I would want to do a different category. I'm trying to think what we HAVEN'T done. There is hardly something we haven't really done.” 

16. AT ONE POINT, THERE WAS A LISA FRANK APP. 

Lisa Frank Pic n’ Share allowed users to put Lisa Frank stickers on their photos. (Sadly for U.S.-based Frank fans, the app currently isn’t available here.) 

17. FRANK WOULD LIKE TO MAKE A THEME PARK.

“If I could do anything, I think a theme park,” Frank told UO. “Because the world of Lisa Frank really is a world. And I think before I die, we should have that world someplace, not just on paper. I think that would be pretty awesome.”

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Tengi
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The Secret to the World's Most Comfortable Bed Might Be Yak Hair
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Tengi

Savoir Beds laughs at your unspooling mail-order mattresses and their promises of ultimate comfort. The UK-based company has teamed with London's Savoy Hotel to offer what they’ve declared is one of the most luxurious nights of sleep you’ll ever experience. 

What do they have that everyone else lacks? About eight pounds of Mongolian yak hair.

The elegantly-named Savoir No. 1 Khangai Limited Edition is part of the hotel’s elite Royal Suite accommodations. For $1845 a night, guests can sink into the mattress with a topper stuffed full of yak hair from Khangai, Mongolia. Hand-combed and with heat-dispensing properties, it takes 40 yaks to make one topper. In a press release, collaborator and yarn specialist Tengri claims it “transcends all levels of comfort currently available.”

Visitors opting for such deluxe amenities also have access to a hair stylist, butler, chef, and a Rolls-Royce with a driver.

Savoir Beds has entered into a fair-share partnership with the farmers, who receive an equitable wage in exchange for the fibers, which are said to be softer than cashmere. If you’d prefer to luxuriate like that every night, the purchase price for the bed is $93,000. Purchased separately, the topper is $17,400. Act soon, as only 50 of the beds will be made available each year. 

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
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Fart Gallery: A Novel History of Spencer Gifts
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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

When U.S. Army Corps bombardier Max Spencer Adler was shot down over Europe and imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II, it’s not likely he dreamed of one day becoming the czar of penis-shaped lollipops and lava lamps. But when Adler became a free man, he decided to capitalize on a booming post-war economy by doing exactly that—pursuing a career as the head of a gag gift mail-order empire that would eventually stretch across 600 retail locations and become a rite of passage for mall-trekking teens in the 1980s and 1990s.

To sneak into a Spencer Gifts store against your parents' wishes and revel in its array of tacky novelties and adult toys felt a little like getting away with something. Glowing with lasers and stuffed with Halloween masks, the layout always had something interesting within arm’s reach. But stocking the stores with such provocations sometimes carried consequences.

A row of lava lamps on display at Spencer Gifts
Dean Hochman, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Returning from the war, Adler sensed a wave of relief running through the general population. Goods no longer had to be rationed, and toy factories could return to making nonessential items. The guilt of spending time or money on frivolous items was disappearing.

With his brother Harry, Adler started Spencer Gifts as a mail-order business in 1947. Their catalog, which became an immediate success, was populated with items like do-it-yourself backyard skating rinks and cotton candy makers [PDF]—items no one really needed but were inexpensive enough to indulge in. In some ways, the Spencer catalogs resembled the mail-order comic ads promising X-ray glasses and undersea fish kingdoms. Instead of kids, Adler was targeting the deeper pockets of adults.

Bolstered by that early success, Adler moved into a curious category: live animals. He had small donkeys transported from Mexico and marketed them as the new trend in domestic pets. LIFE magazine took note of the fad in 1954, observing the $85 burros, being sold at a clip of 40 a day, “except for stubbornness, are very placid.”

Burro fever foreshadowed the direction of Spencer’s in the years to come. The Adlers opened their first physical location—minus livestock—in Cherry Hill, New Jersey in 1963, expanding on their notion to peddle unique gift items like the Reduce-Eze girdle, which promised to shave inches off the wearer’s stomach. That claim caught the attention of the Federal Trade Commission, which chastised the company for advertising the device could reduce body weight without exercise [PDF]. The FTC also took them to task for implying their jewelry contained precious metals [PDF] when the items did not.

Offending the FTC aside, Spencer’s did a brisk enough business to garner the attention of California-based entertainment company Music Corporation of America, Inc. (MCA), which purchased the brand and proceeded to expand it in the rapidly growing number of malls across the country in the 1970s and 1980s. (The mail order business closed in 1990.)

Brick and mortar retail was ideal for their inventory, which encouraged perusal, store demonstrations, and roving bands of giggling teenagers. The company wanted its stores to capture foot traffic by stuffing its aisles with items that had a look-at-this factor—a novelty that invited someone to pick it up and show it to a friend. When executives saw specific categories taking off, they “Spencerized,” or amalgamated them. When there was a resurgence of interest in Rubik’s Cubes and merchandise from the 1983 Al Pacino film Scarface, visitors were soon greeted in stores by stacks of Scarface-themed Rubik’s Cubes.

Mike Mozart via Flickr

Apart from its busy aesthetic—“like the stage from an old Poison video,” as one journalist put it—Spencer's was also known for its inventory of risqué adult novelty items. Pole-dancing kits and sex-themed card games occupied a portion of the store’s layout. The toys captured a demographic that might have been too embarrassed to visit a dedicated adult store but felt that browsing in a mall was harmless.

Sometimes, the store’s blasé attitude toward stocking such items drew critical attention. In 2010, police in Rapid City, South Dakota seized hundreds of items because Spencer's had failed to register as an “adult-oriented business,” something the city ordinance required. As far back as the 1980s, parents in various locales had complained that suggestive material was viewable by minors. In 2008, ABC news affiliate WTVD in Durham, North Carolina dispatched two teenage girls with hidden cameras to see what they would be allowed to buy. While they were shooed away from a back-of-store display, they were able to purchase “two toy rabbits that vibrate, moan, and simulate sex” as well as a penis-shaped necklace.

As a possible consequence of the internet, there are fewer incidences of parental outrage directed at Spencer’s these days. And despite the general downturn of both malls and retail shopping, the company bolsters its bottom line with the seasonal arrival of Spirit Halloween, a pop-up store specializing in costumes. Despite only being open two months out of the year, their Spirit locations contribute to roughly half of Spencer's $250 million in annual revenue.

Today, the chain’s 650 stores remain a source for impulse shopping. They still occasionally court controversy over items that appear to stereotype the Irish as drunken oafs or other inflammatory merchandise. With traditional mall locations expected to shrink by as much as 25 percent over the next five years, it’s not quite clear whether their assortment of novelties will continue to have a large retail footprint. But so long as demand exists for fake poop, fart sprays, and penis ring toss kits, Spencer’s will probably have a home.

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