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Build Your Very Own Mini DeLorean With Soda Cans

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of Back to the Future, lifehacker extraordinaire Dave Hax (who has videos on everything from how to draw a perfect circle to how to karate chop a watermelon) has made a nifty tutorial on how to build a DeLorean with Pepsi cans.

The reason for that particular brand of cola is twofold: Marty McFly drinks Pepsi in the films, and the cans are made out of steel instead of aluminum, providing good raw materials for car-building. Everything else you need to trick out your time machine is probably already sitting in a junk drawer, craft corner, or refrigerator in your house, and Hax even provides templates for download.

Marty and Doc aren’t included, but we know another pop culture reference that might be useful for building out a fully-realized beverage can world.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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This Just In
How to Tell if You're a 'Xennial'
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Generational labels began to take off with the Baby Boomers—those born in postwar America in a prospering, increasingly suburban environment. Then there was Generation X, the brooding, alt-rock-consuming cluster of babies. They were followed by the Millennials, those coming of age around 2000 and who easily adapted to the digital revolution.

Those broad strokes may now include the Xennials, a specific "micro-generation" of babies born between 1977 and 1983 who grew up with some of the basic tenets of pre-digital technology—landline phones, broadcast television, and handwritten letters—who then adapted to social media in their 20s.

The segment of the population has been identified by Dan Woodman, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Melbourne in Australia. Woodman believes Xennials deserve their own banner because of their hybrid youth that straddled the line between the last gasp of quaint communications and the rise of the internet.

"It was a particularly unique experience," Woodman told Mamamia.com. "You have a childhood, youth, and adolescence free of having to worry about social media posts and mobile phones. It was a time when we had to organize to catch up with our friends on the weekends using the landline, and actually pick a time and a place and turn up there. Then we hit this technology revolution before we were maybe in that frazzled period of our life with kids and no time to learn anything new. We hit it where we could still adopt, in a selective way, the new technologies."

Xennials' attitudes, Woodman says, are distinct from Gen X's pessimism and Millennial optimism because they've had a toe in two very different cultural landscapes. Time will tell if Woodman's Xennial label will catch on, but odds are if you grew up with a Trapper Keeper and are now reading this on a mobile device, you probably qualify as one.

[h/t Daily Mail]

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History
The Spiritual Purpose Behind Shrunken Heads
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Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/GettyImages

If you’ve ever visited a museum like New York's American Museum of Natural History, you may have noticed a strange—yet oddly fascinating—relic on display: a shrunken human head. Artifacts like these may appear to be bloody battle trophies, but as the Smithsonian Channel explains, they once served as protective talismans for the Shuar people of Ecuador.

The Shuar are an indigenous people who live in the remote jungles of the Amazon. Long ago, they beheaded their enemies, and shrunk their over-the-shoulder remains by defleshing, simmering, and searing them with hot stones and sand. They also sewed the eyes closed, and pegged or sewed the mouth and nostrils shut. These creations were known as tsantsas.

“The Shuar believe in spirits,” explains Anna Dhody, a forensic anthropologist and curator of the Mütter Museum in Philadelphia, in the video below. “They believed that the spirit of their enemy could still harm them after death, and that they had to take preventative measures. So by taking the head of their enemy and creating these very special tsantsas, they could actually, effectively seal the spirit of their defeated enemy in the head.”

Learn more about the history of the practice below.

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