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25 Yada Yada Yada Facts About Seinfeld

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Sony Pictures Television

Though it’s famously earned the reputation of being a “show about nothing,” the idea behind Seinfeld was anything but. Here are 25 things you might not know about the legendary sitcom.

1. IT BEGAN AS A ONE-OFF TELEVISION SPECIAL.

The original concept for Seinfeld wasn’t for an ongoing series, but a one-off, 90-minute special titled Stand Up that was set to run for one night only in Saturday Night Live’s timeslot.

2. IT WAS NEVER PITCHED AS “A SHOW ABOUT NOTHING.”

During a 2014 Reddit AMA, Jerry Seinfeld admitted that both he and co-creator Larry David were surprised by how Seinfeld earned its “show about nothing” moniker: “The pitch for the show, the real pitch, when Larry and I went to NBC in 1988, was we want to show how a comedian gets his material,’” Seinfeld explained. “The show about nothing was just a joke in an episode many years later, and Larry and I to this day are surprised that it caught on as a way that people describe the show, because to us it’s the opposite of that.”

3. KRAMER WAS ORIGINALLY KESSLER.

In the pilot episode, Kramer is called Kessler, as the real Kramer—Larry David’s former neighbor, Kenny Kramer—was hesitant to let his name be used for the show. Eventually, the “real” Kramer relented. Though he says he was paid just $1000 for the use of his name in the series, Kramer has since profited in other ways, namely with his Kramer’s Reality Tour bus tour (which is now in its 19th year).

4. JERRY SEINFELD WANTED JAKE JOHANNSEN TO PLAY GEORGE.

Though it’s hard to imagine Seinfeld without Jason Alexander as George Costanza, Seinfeld admitted that Alexander was not his first choice for the part. In an interview with Access Hollywood, Seinfeld said that he “begged” fellow comedian Jake Johannsen to take the part, but Johannsen refused.

5. STEVE BUSCEMI AUDITIONED FOR GEORGE.

Steve Buscemi is one of many soon-to-be-successful actors who unsuccessfully auditioned for Seinfeld. David Alan Grier was also in the mix, as was David Letterman’s bandleader Paul Shaffer, who said in his autobiography that his resemblance to Larry David (upon whom George is based) was what made him of interest to the show’s creators.

6. JASON ALEXANDER DIDN’T THINK THE SHOW HAD A CHANCE.

Jason Alexander loved the script for Seinfeld, which is what made him question the show's potential to be successful. “From the moment I saw the script I thought it would be the most brilliant thing I'd ever be part of, and that it would not run for even a day,” Alexander told Deseret News in 1992. “Because the audience for this show is me, and I don't watch TV … But I don't think anyone is more surprised by the success of [Seinfeld] than we are, because we thought, ‘Oh, we'll amuse ourselves, and that'll be it. We'll have a videotape at the end of it that we could play at parties.’”

7. JASON ALEXANDER DIDN’T APPEAR IN ONE EPISODE—AND HE WASN’T HAPPY ABOUT IT.

In all of Seinfeld’s 172 episodes, there’s only one in which Alexander doesn’t appear—the season three episode, “The Pen,” which has Jerry and Elaine visiting Jerry’s parents in Florida (and Jerry getting an astronaut pen from their neighbor). Nervous that being written out of the episode meant that he could be written out of the show, Alexander warned Larry David that “if you do it again, do it permanently.”

8. THE REAL COSTANZA SUED FOR $100 MILLION.

Like Kramer, George Costanza was (partially) named after a real person: Jerry’s former friend Michael Costanza, who sued Seinfeld, David, and NBC for $100 million, claiming that the series had violated his privacy. The court sided with the show’s creators, who have always maintained that George is based on co-creator Larry David. In his book, The Real Seinfeld (As Told by the Real Costanza), Costanza noted: “George is bald. I am bald. George is stocky. I am stocky. George and I both went to Queens College with Jerry. George's high-school teacher nicknamed him ‘Can't stand ya.’ So did mine. George had a thing about bathrooms and parking spaces. So do I.”

9. JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS WASN’T AWARE OF THE PILOT EPISODE UNTIL 2004.

Originally, the main female character was supposed to be Claire, a waitress at the coffee shop who would offer Jerry and George advice with their coffee. “[W]hen we shot the pilot, I was the girl in Seinfeld,” Lee Garlington, the actress who played Claire in the pilot, told The Huffington Post. “They didn't pick up my contract.” There are differing accounts as to why this happened. Jason Alexander said it was because Garlington rewrote all of her lines; while Seinfeld confirmed that she did indeed give Larry David a rewrite, he swears that that’s not the reason she was replaced, saying they just needed “a character who was a little more involved.”

In a making-of documentary on the season one DVD, Julia Louis-Dreyfus admits that she wasn’t even aware of the pilot until 2004—and has no plans to watch it. Garlington can relate: “I think I watched two episodes in 10 years just because I had friends on it or something,” she said. “It didn't bother me the first five years. [Laughs] But the second five years drove me nuts. I don't know why.”

10. ROSIE O’DONNELL AUDITIONED FOR ELAINE.

Rosie O’Donnell auditioned for the part of Elaine at the behest of Larry David; the two were old friends, having come up on the standup comedy scene together. Mariska Hargitay, Patricia Heaton, Amy Yasbeck, and Megan Mullally were also among the other actresses considered for the part.

11. ELAINE’S DAD REALLY DID SCARE THE HELL OUT OF THE CAST.

In the series, Elaine’s father is a noted author, Alton Benes. The character was based on Revolutionary Road novelist Richard Yates, the father of Larry David’s own ex, Monica Yates (who really did intimidate David). In the series, Alton was played by legendary tough guy Lawrence Tierney (who played Joe in Reservoir Dogs) in the season two episode “The Jacket” (which was based on David’s real night out with Yates). Though it was intended to be a recurring role, Tierney—like his on-screen counterpart—really did terrify the cast, particularly when Seinfeld discovered that he had stolen a butcher knife from the set, and hid it under his jacket. “Lawrence Tierney scared the living crap out of all of us,” Alexander admitted. And so, Alton Benes made just a single appearance on the show.

12. THERE WAS A STRICT “NO HUGGING, NO LEARNING” POLICY.

Larry David made sure that the cast and crew were aware of his “no hugging, no learning” motto for the show, which meant that they should avoid any sort of sentimentality or situations that would force the characters to change or grow. “A lot of people don't understand that Seinfeld is a dark show,” David once remarked. “If you examine the premises, terrible things happen to people. They lose jobs; somebody breaks up with a stroke victim; somebody's told they need a nose job. That's my sensibility.”

13. THE REAL SOUP NAZI SAYS THE SHOW RUINED HIS LIFE.

Al Yeganeh, the real soup store owner upon whom The Soup Nazi is based, was not pleased with his depiction in the series, as is evident from the CNN interview above, where he calls Seinfeld “a clown” whose use of “the N word—the Nazi word—is disgraceful.” When the interviewer countered that “you’re famous because of him,” Yeganeh insisted “No. He got fame through me. I made him famous.” Unsurprisingly, Seinfeld was banned from Yeganeh’s restaurant (which didn’t stop the comedian from making a surprise appearance when the soup stall reopened in 2010).

14. THE FARRELLY BROTHERS WROTE AN EPISODE.

Two years before Dumb & Dumber made them two of Hollywood’s reigning kings of comedy, Peter and Bobby Farrelly wrote an episode of Seinfeld. The There’s Something About Mary co-creators wrote “The Virgin” in season four, in which Jerry dates Marla the virgin (Frasier’s Jane Leeves) and Elaine attempts to give her an education in sex in the 1990s.

15. JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS GOT SUSAN KILLED OFF.

Nearly 20 years after Susan Ross, George’s fiancée, was killed off in the seventh season, Jason Alexander revealed what prompted that particularly morbid storyline. In an interview with Howard Stern, Alexander admitted that, “I couldn't figure out how to play off of [Heidi Swedberg]. Her instincts for doing a scene, where the comedy was, and mine were always misfiring. And she would do something, and I would go, ‘OK, I see what she's going to do—I'm going to adjust to her.' And I'd adjust, and then it would change.” Then it was Louis-Dreyfus’s turn to share some scenes with Hedberg. “They go, 'You know what? It's f—ing impossible. It's impossible,'" Alexander continued. "And Julia actually said, 'Don't you want to just kill her?' And Larry went, 'Ka-bang!'" And that was that.

16. THERE’S AN ABANDONED EPISODE CALLED “THE BET.”

Though it may have seemed as if no topic was off-limits for Seinfeld’s creators (remember "The Contest"?), an episode that revolved around the ease with which one could buy a handgun was eventually dumped. Titled “The Bet,” it was written for the show’s second season; “We started making it and stopped in the middle and said ‘this doesn't work,’” Seinfeld recalled during an AMA. “We did the read-through and then canceled it. A lot of other stuff happened, but trying to make that funny ended up being no fun.” The episode was replaced with “The Phone Message.”

17. A MILLER BREWING EXECUTIVE WAS FIRED FOR DISCUSSING “THE JUNIOR MINT” EPISODE WITH A FEMALE CO-WORKER.

It’s the episode where Jerry can’t remember his girlfriend’s name, but knows that it rhymes with a female body part. After discussing the episode with a female colleague, Jerold Mackenzie, then an executive at Milwaukee’s Miller Brewing, was fired for sexual harassment. Mackenzie, in turn, counter-sued—and was awarded $26.6 million. (A verdict which was overturned on appeal.)

18. THE WRITERS THOUGHT ELAINE’S DANCE MOVES MIGHT KILL LOUIS-DREYFUS’S CAREER.

Seinfeld writer Spike Feresten told The Huffington Post that Larry David was not a fan of the eighth season episode “The Little Kicks,” in which Elaine (for lack of a better term) dances. He only got approval on the storyline after David had left, but then became concerned that it might be a big mistake. “I remember walking through at rehearsal,” Feresten recalled. “[Writer-producer] Jennifer Crittenden pulled me aside after Julia did the dance for the first time and said, 'Are you sure about this? Are you sure you're not ruining Julia Louis-Dreyfus's career?' 'No, I'm not.' That's the year she won an Emmy.” Sweet, fancy Moses!

19. THE BACKWARDS EPISODE WAS INSPIRED BY HAROLD PINTER.

Season nine’s backwards episode, “The Betrayal,” is based on a Harold Pinter play of the same name, which utilizes a similarly nonlinear narrative device. And also explains why Sue-Ellen Mishkie’s fiancé’s name is Pinter.

20. THERE WAS A JACKIE STILES SPINOFF IN THE WORKS.

Back in 1999, more than a year after the Seinfeld finale had aired, the media was abuzz with what would be the series’s first spinoff: The Jackie Chiles Show. Phil Morris, who made a handful of appearances on the series as a fast-talking, Johnnie Cochran-like lawyer, was working with Seinfeld and David on the pitch, which would find him as the sole black lawyer in an all-white firm. At some point, plans apparently fell apart.

21. GEORGE STEINBRENNER ACTUALLY FILMED SOME SCENES FOR THE SHOW.

During George’s tenure with the Yankees organization, legendary team owner George Steinbrenner was a recurring character … except we never saw his face and he was voiced by Larry David. But Steinbrenner proved to be a good sport when he agreed to film some scenes for the show, in which he proposes that he and Elaine attend George’s wedding together. Unfortunately, the cameo never aired.

22. SEINFELD TURNED DOWN $110 MILLION FOR SEASON 10.

Not that there's anything wrong with that. But when Seinfeld turned down the chance to earn $5 million per episode—a grand total of $110 million—to come back for a tenth season, the network finally got that he wasn’t kidding around.

23. NUMEROLOGY PLAYED A PART IN THE SHOW’S CONCLUSION.

Seinfeld has made no secret about his love of the number nine. In an interview with Vanity Fair about the show’s end, he explained that part of the reason for his decision to end at nine seasons was because: “Nine is cool. When I was thinking about quitting the show, I thought, nine. People said, 'Ten—why not 10?' But 10 is lame. Nine is my number. And then I found out that nine in numerology means completion.”

24. THE SERIES BEGINS AND ENDS WITH BUTTONS.

It might take binge-watching the series to realize that the very first conversation Jerry and George have in the pilot (which you can see in the clip above) and their last conversation in the finale are about a poorly-placed button, and are almost verbatim.

25. JERRY DOESN’T LIKE “THE ALTERNATE SIDE.”

When asked about his least favorite episode of the series on Watch What Happens: Live, Seinfeld admitted that it was “The Alternate Side,” in which Jerry’s car is stolen, George blocks traffic during a Woody Allen film shoot, and Kramer gets fired before he ever gets to utter his now-famous line: “These pretzels are making me thirsty!” His favorite show moment? “George pulling out the golf ball at the end of the marine biologist episode,” he told Uproxx. "That’s my favorite moment from the entire series.”

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5 Things We Know About Stranger Things Season 2
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Stranger Things seemed to come out of nowhere to become one of television's standout new series in 2016. Netflix's sometimes scary, sometimes funny, and always exciting homage to '80s pop culture was a binge-worthy phenomenon when it debuted in July 2016. Of course, the streaming giant wasn't going to wait long to bring more Stranger Things to audiences, and a second season was announced a little over a month after its debut—and Netflix just announced that we'll be getting it a few days earlier than expected. Here are five key things we know about the show's sophomore season, which kicks off on October 27.

1. WE'LL BE GETTING EVEN MORE EPISODES.

The first season of Stranger Things consisted of eight hour-long episodes, which proved to be a solid length for the story Matt and Ross Duffer wanted to tell. While season two won't increase in length dramatically, we will be getting at least one extra hour when the show returns in 2017 with nine episodes. Not much is known about any of these episodes, but we do know the titles:

"Madmax"
"The Boy Who Came Back To Life"
"The Pumpkin Patch"
"The Palace"
"The Storm"
"The Pollywog"
"The Secret Cabin"
"The Brain"
"The Lost Brother"

There's a lot of speculation about what each title means and, as usual with Stranger Things, there's probably a reason for each one.

2. THE KIDS ARE RETURNING (INCLUDING ELEVEN).

Stranger Things fans should gear up for plenty of new developments in season two, but that doesn't mean your favorite characters aren't returning. A November 4 photo sent out by the show's Twitter account revealed most of the kids from the first season will be back in 2017, including the enigmatic Eleven, played by Millie Bobby Brown (the #elevenisback hashtag used by series regular Finn Wolfhard should really drive the point home):

3. THE SHOW'S 1984 SETTING WILL LEAD TO A DARKER TONE.

A year will have passed between the first and second seasons of the show, allowing the Duffer brothers to catch up with a familiar cast of characters that has matured since we last saw them. With the story taking place in 1984, the brothers are looking at the pop culture zeitgeist at the time for inspiration—most notably the darker tone of blockbusters like Gremlins and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

"I actually really love Temple of Doom, I love that it gets a little darker and weirder from Raiders, I like that it feels very different than Raiders did," Matt Duffer told IGN. "Even though it was probably slammed at the time—obviously now people look back on it fondly, but it messed up a lot of kids, and I love that about that film—that it really traumatized some children. Not saying that we want to traumatize children, just that we want to get a little darker and weirder."

4. IT'S NOT SO MUCH A CONTINUATION AS IT IS A SEQUEL.

When you watch something like The Americans season two, it's almost impossible to catch on unless you've seen the previous episodes. Stranger Things season two will differ from the modern TV approach by being more of a sequel than a continuation of the first year. That means a more self-contained plot that doesn't leave viewers hanging at the end of nine episodes.

"There are lingering questions, but the idea with Season 2 is there's a new tension and the goal is can the characters resolve that tension by the end," Ross Duffer told IGN. "So it's going to be its own sort of complete little movie, very much in the way that Season 1 is."

Don't worry about the two seasons of Stranger Things being too similar or too different from the original, though, because when speaking with Entertainment Weekly about the influences on the show, Matt Duffer said, "I guess a lot of this is James Cameron. But he’s brilliant. And I think one of the reasons his sequels are as successful as they are is he makes them feel very different without losing what we loved about the original. So I think we kinda looked to him and what he does and tried to capture a little bit of the magic of his work.”

5. THE PREMIERE WILL TRAVEL OUTSIDE OF HAWKINS.

Everything about the new Stranger Things episodes will be kept secret until they finally debut later this year, but we do know one thing about the premiere: It won't take place entirely in the familiar town of Hawkins, Indiana. “We will venture a little bit outside of Hawkins,” Matt Duffer told Entertainment Weekly. “I will say the opening scene [of the premiere] does not take place in Hawkins.”

So, should we take "a little bit outside" as literally as it sounds? You certainly can, but in that same interview, the brothers also said they're both eager to explore the Upside Down, the alternate dimension from the first season. Whether the season kicks off just a few miles away, or a few worlds away, you'll get your answer when Stranger Things's second season debuts next month.

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Everything That’s Leaving Netflix in October
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NBC - © 2012 NBCUniversal Media, LLC

Netflix subscribers are already counting down the days until the premiere of the new season of Stranger Things. But, as always, in order to make room for the near-90 new titles making their way to the streaming site, some of your favorite titles—including all of 30 Rock, The Wonder Years, and Malcolm in the Middle—must go. Here’s everything that’s leaving Netflix in October ... binge ‘em while you can!

October 1

30 Rock (Seasons 1-7)

A Love in Times of Selfies

Across the Universe

Barton Fink

Bella

Big Daddy

Carousel

Cradle 2 the Grave

Crafting a Nation

Curious George: A Halloween Boo Fest

Daddy’s Little Girls

Dark Was the Night

David Attenborough’s Rise of the Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates (Season 1)

Day of the Kamikaze

Death Beach

Dowry Law

Dr. Dolittle: Tail to the Chief

Friday Night Lights (Seasons 1-5)

Happy Feet

Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison

Hellboy

Kagemusha

Laura

Love Actually

Malcolm in the Middle (Seasons 1-7)

Max Dugan Returns

Millennium 

Million Dollar Baby

Mortal Combat

Mr. 3000

Mulholland Dr.

My Father the Hero

My Name Is Earl (Seasons 1-4)

One Tree Hill (Seasons 1-9)

Patton

Picture This

Prison Break (Seasons 1-4)

The Bernie Mac Show (Seasons 1-5)

The Shining

The Wonder Years (Seasons 1-6)

Titanic

October 19

The Cleveland Show (Seasons 1-4)

October 21

Bones (Seasons 5-11)

October 27

Lie to Me (Seasons 2-3)

Louie (Seasons 1-5)

Hot Transylvania 2

October 29

Family Guy (Seasons 9-14)

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